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Article
Publication date: 24 April 2009

Erkki K. Laitinen

The purpose of this study is to analyse the connection between managerial job and importance of job‐relevant performance information.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to analyse the connection between managerial job and importance of job‐relevant performance information.

Design/methodology/approach

Two hypotheses on the relationship of the nature of job to the job‐relevant information are tested by survey data gathered in spring 2008. The data include responses from 76 Finnish CEOs in manufacturing industry. Managerial job, information, and information gap types are extracted by the factor analysis. The hypotheses are tested by the regression analysis.

Findings

Evidence shows that the type of job strongly influences the importance of different information types in managerial work. However, information gap does not depend on the type of work but on contextual variables.

Research limitations/implications

The results limited by the small sample size and industry. Larger data, advanced statistical methods, and different constructs to measure managerial job and contextual variables should be used in further studies.

Practical implications

Contingency factors are important in affecting the nature of managerial job. Managerial job largely determines the importance of information but the gap of information depends on contextual environment. It is important to take account of the nature of managerial job in designing information systems.

Originality/value

This study shows that managerial job mediates the effect of contingency factors on the importance of information. However, these factors have a direct effect on the gap of information.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 109 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

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Book part
Publication date: 28 August 2007

Aparna Joshi and Hyuntak Roh

Several comprehensive reviews are united in drawing the conclusion that the cumulative research evidence on work team diversity is equivocal. Rather than review the extant…

Abstract

Several comprehensive reviews are united in drawing the conclusion that the cumulative research evidence on work team diversity is equivocal. Rather than review the extant state of diversity research, in this paper we redirect attention to the context of workplace diversity as a possible explanation for these mixed findings. We discuss how diversity context may be conceptualized, specify various aspects of this context at multiple levels of analysis, and consider how contextual variables can shape the outcomes of work team diversity. We present findings from a literature review (1999–2006) to identify key trends and patterns of results reported in recent research as well as contextual factors that have received attention to date. This paper also considers how the non-significant, positive, negative, and curvilinear effects of diversity reported in studies can be explained by the contextual factors outlined. Implications for future research are also discussed.

Details

Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7623-1432-4

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Article
Publication date: 16 June 2021

JD Visser and Caren Brenda Scheepers

Organisations have to be ambidextrous to survive in modern times. This study, therefore, aims to investigate the influence of contextual leadership on exploratory and…

Abstract

Purpose

Organisations have to be ambidextrous to survive in modern times. This study, therefore, aims to investigate the influence of contextual leadership on exploratory and exploitative innovation. Environmental dynamism was the moderator in this relationship, and innovation climate was the mediator.

Design/methodology/approach

The research design was a quantitative study, using a Web-based survey questionnaire, which consisted of valid and reliable scales. There were 1,204 respondents who completed the survey. Analyses included reliability, validity tests and structural equation modelling to test the hypothesised relationships among the variables.

Findings

The results show that exploitative and exploratory innovation is predicted by the innovation climate, which in turn is predicted by contextual leadership. The findings include a slight moderating effect of environmental dynamism on these relationships. The results suggest that contextual leadership is a significant predictor for improving innovation climate.

Practical implications

As contextual leadership explains 33% of the variance in organisational climate, companies can benefit from developing their leaders to create climates that promote innovation. At increased levels of environmental dynamism, innovation efforts should increase.

Originality/value

Contextual leadership is a crucial element to build innovation-friendly workplaces. The study addresses the gap in research on the influence of contextual leadership on exploitative and exploratory innovation with the mediating and moderator effect on this relationship.

Details

European Business Review, vol. 34 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-534X

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Article
Publication date: 4 November 2013

Fadi Alkaraan and Deryl Northcott

This paper aims to examine the relationship between key contextual factors (type of strategic investment decision-making (SIDM), decision uncertainty, organizational…

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1746

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the relationship between key contextual factors (type of strategic investment decision-making (SIDM), decision uncertainty, organizational goals, financial and non-financial corporate performance, firm size, and decision-maker background) and three significant dimensions of SIDM processes (procedural rationality, strategy formulation and political behaviour).

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was mailed to the financial directors of manufacturing companies selected from the UK Financial Analysis Made Easy database. Factor analysis and multiple regression analysis were used to analyse the survey results.

Findings

The findings reveal that SIDM is more complex and less systematic than the normative literature suggests, with a combination of contextual factors influencing the decision-making process. Further, the regression results suggest that SIDM is shaped by the interplay of procedural rationality, strategy formulation and political behaviour and that none of these on its own can sufficiently explain SIDM practice.

Research limitations/implications

The survey data are drawn from UK manufacturing companies, so the findings may not be generalisable beyond that context.

Practical implications

The findings suggest a need for firms to recognise that strategy formulation and political aspects of decision-making are as important as “rational” financial analysis in SIDM practice. Further, since SIDM practice is shaped by a combination of contextual factors, a comprehensive overview of these factors is necessary to direct SIDM outcomes.

Originality/value

This study adds to the limited prior research examining the links between contextual factors and SIDM processes. Prior studies have tended to focus on only one dimension, or on limited factors, and have reported inconsistent findings. This paper provides a broader view of the complex nature of SIDM processes.

Details

Meditari Accountancy Research, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-372X

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1997

Marjorie Chan

This conceptual paper focuses on trust and its context. Previous research indicates the importance of the specific‐situational nature of trust, which is affected by both…

Abstract

This conceptual paper focuses on trust and its context. Previous research indicates the importance of the specific‐situational nature of trust, which is affected by both interpersonal and organizational contextual factors. Hypotheses are formulated, and they revolve around trust and various interpersonal and organizational contextual variables. The interpersonal contextual factors included are the types of trustor‐trustee relationships, ethnicity of the trustors and trustees, perceived inequity, and the importance of a cooperative or noncooperative act to the receiving party. The organizational contextual factors included are politics, ownership structure, and organizational form. In addition to main effects, some of these variables may have interaction effects on trust. Also, the organizational contextual variables mediated by the interpersonal contextual variables may have indirect effects on trust.

Details

The International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1055-3185

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Article
Publication date: 24 May 2011

Gregory N. Stock and Christopher McDermott

The purpose of this paper is to examine empirically how operational performance and contextual factors contribute to differences in overall patient care costs across…

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1442

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine empirically how operational performance and contextual factors contribute to differences in overall patient care costs across different hospitals.

Design/methodology/approach

Administrative data are employed from a sample of hospitals in New York State to construct measures of contextual factors, operational performance, and cost per patient. Operational performance and cost variables are adjusted to account for case mix differences across hospitals. Hierarchical regression is used to analyze the effects of contextual and operational variables on cost performance.

Findings

Increased length of stay, increased patient volume, and educational mission were associated with higher cost per patient. Mortality performance was associated with lower cost per patient. However, it was not found that location, size, or ownership status had a significant relationship with cost performance.

Practical implications

This paper identifies several significant relationships between contextual and operational variables and hospital costs. From a managerial perspective, these findings highlight the fact that some drivers of cost in hospitals are under the control of managers. One of the primary cost drivers in the study is length of stay, which implies that there is significant room for improvement in healthcare performance through a focus on operational excellence.

Originality/value

For researchers, the present study highlights the relative importance of operational versus contextual factors, with respect to cost performance in hospitals. The results of this study also provide direction for additional research into the role operational performance might play in determining the overall organizational performance in a hospital.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 25 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

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Article
Publication date: 16 June 2021

Hina Munir, Sidra Ramzan, Miao Wang, Yasir Rasool, Muhammad Saleem Sumbal and Asim Iqbal

Drawing on the entrepreneurial event model (EEM), entrepreneurship education programs (EEPs) and perceived contextual support (adapted from social cognitive career theory…

Abstract

Purpose

Drawing on the entrepreneurial event model (EEM), entrepreneurship education programs (EEPs) and perceived contextual support (adapted from social cognitive career theory) and perceived contextual barriers, this study aims to unravel the differences in entrepreneurial activity among university students in higher education institutes in two diverse Asian countries.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses a cross-sectional survey-based data collection technique using paper and electronic methods. The study analyzes data using descriptive statistics, principal component analysis, reliability analysis and logistic regression analysis via SPSS version 25.

Findings

The findings show the positive influence of perceived desirability and feasibility on entrepreneurial intentions; however, the stronger desirability was found among university students in China and stronger feasibility toward entrepreneurial intentions among Pakistani students. The study reveals the negative significant influence of EEPs on entrepreneurial intentions, and this finding is consistent across both samples. Furthermore, the findings show that university students in both countries show insignificant impact of perceived contextual support in predicting entrepreneurial intentions. Finally, the study confirms the negative influence of perceived barriers on entrepreneurial intentions in both contexts.

Originality/value

This study provides differences in entrepreneurial activity by combing EEM, EEPs, perceived contextual support and barriers in two diverse Asian countries, and to the best of author’s knowledge, no previous study considered these factors in a single framework. Furthermore, the findings of the study enrich existing literature and also provide policy recommendations for practitioners.

Details

Journal of Entrepreneurship in Emerging Economies, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2053-4604

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2016

Jonathan H. Westover

There is a growing body of comparative research examining country differences in job satisfaction and its determinants. However, existing research cannot explain…

Abstract

Purpose

There is a growing body of comparative research examining country differences in job satisfaction and its determinants. However, existing research cannot explain similarities in job satisfaction levels across very different countries, nor can it explain the differences between seemingly similar countries. Moreover, there has been no significant research conducted to date that has examined the country-level contextual conditions that are poised to impact worker satisfaction and its determinants. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

In this research, the author address this existing gap in the academic literature on job satisfaction by using non-panel longitudinal data from the International Social Survey Program (Work Orientations I, II, and III: 1989, 1997, and 2005) to examine cross-national differences in job satisfaction and its determinants. The author compare and combine previous international political economy theoretical work and hierarchical linear modeling (HLM) to examine global macro-level variables and their impact on worker satisfaction cross-nationally.

Findings

Study results demonstrate that both intrinsic and extrinsic work characteristics strongly impact worker job satisfaction. Furthermore, country by country regression and HLM results suggest that there are important country differences in both the perceived importance of various work characteristics and workers’ self-report experiences with both intrinsic and extrinsic work characteristics.

Research limitations/implications

To get a clearer picture in the HLM analysis as to the full impact of these various country-contextual impacts on differences in perceived job characteristics and worker satisfaction, future research needs to examine a greater number and wider variety of countries, while exploring other theoretically relevant country-level variables that may help to explore country-level differences from these various cross-national theoretical frameworks. Additionally, a more diverse and greater number of participating countries would also potentially help in achieving levels of significance in the level-2 covariates in the HLM models.

Practical implications

Due to the fact the worker job satisfaction impacts firm performance and various measures of worker well-being, firms (regardless of economic sector or private/public status) need to be cognizant of these differences and unique challenges and work to tailor management philosophy and policy to create a unique work atmosphere that will benefit the interests of both the employer and the employee, as well as society at large.

Originality/value

While the nature of work has changed dramatically in the post-war era in response to economic shifts and an increasingly global economy, particularly over the past two decades, this paper examines the previously unexamined country-level contextual and global macro-historical variables driving differences in work quality and perceived worker satisfaction.

Details

Evidence-based HRM: a Global Forum for Empirical Scholarship, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-3983

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Article
Publication date: 15 September 2020

Kurt C. Mayer and Eric Hungenberg

The purpose of this paper was to explore a new sport attendance behavior spectrum framework where sport consumer behavior is not derived from just a dichotomy of a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper was to explore a new sport attendance behavior spectrum framework where sport consumer behavior is not derived from just a dichotomy of a motivator positively impacting attendance or a constraint negatively impacting attendance. Rather, when accounting for the context of the setting (e.g. sport, playing level, locality, patron type, etc.), some areas belong on a spectrum that fluctuates between positive and negative impacts on attendance that are dependent on the context of the given environment.

Design/methodology/approach

Through factor analysis and structural equation modeling, the proposed model attempted to explain relationships between five second-order factors and game attendance, which expanded to include the new internal contextual and external contextual factors, and ultimately team fandom.

Findings

The results indicated three significant main effects where internal contextual exhibited a positive relationship with attendance, while constraints and external contextual demonstrated a negative relationship. Internal and external motives were not significant. Further, the moderating effect of high and low sport interest groupings largely indicated no significant spectator differences. The model explained 24% of the variance in attendance, and attendance accounted for 41% of the variance in team fandom.

Originality/value

Attendance is intricate, and this study highlighted the importance of considering and adapting to the sporting context as some factors exist on a sport attendance behavior spectrum and differently impact spectators positively or negatively, given the context of the setting. Further, in this lower-level sport setting, consumers viewed minor league hockey more as a leisure commodity than a premier sport contest.

Details

International Journal of Sports Marketing and Sponsorship, vol. 22 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1464-6668

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Article
Publication date: 12 June 2018

William James Wilson, Nihal Jayamaha and Greg Frater

This paper aims to theorise and test a causal model of predominantly lean-driven quality improvement (QI) in the context of health-care clinical microsystems, examining…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to theorise and test a causal model of predominantly lean-driven quality improvement (QI) in the context of health-care clinical microsystems, examining the effects contextual factors in this setting have on improvement activity.

Design/methodology/approach

QI practitioners at a New Zealand District Health Board were surveyed on a range of contextual factors hypothesised to influence improvement outcomes. Survey responses were analysed via partial least squares path modelling to test the causal model that was designed to be consistent with the “model for understanding success in quality” (MUSIQ) model (Kaplan et al., 2012) adopted in health-care QI.

Findings

Defined variables for teamwork, respect for people, lean actions and negative motivating factors all demonstrated significant effects. These findings support the representation of the microsystem layer within the MUSIQ model. The final model predicted and explained perceived success well (adjusted R2 = 0.58).

Research limitations/implications

The sample was a non-probability sample and the sample size was small (n = 105), although power analysis indicated that we exceeded the minimum sample size (97 cases). Even though health-care processes have universality, this study was conducted in only one district in New Zealand.

Practical implications

The results support highly functional teamwork as the critical contextual factor in health-care QI outcomes and suggest lean-driven process improvement can be a valid mediating mechanism. The key recommendation for practitioners is to increase focus on human resource capability when initiating and supporting QI.

Originality/value

The originality is testing the robustness of the MUSIQ model specifically in a lean environment, which provides the context for QI. The paper provides a more detailed specification of contextual factors acting as exogenous variables that moderate the cause (lean actions) and the effect (perceived success).

Details

International Journal of Lean Six Sigma, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-4166

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