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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1993

Stuart Price

Fast‐food and franchising should present a formidable marriage whencoping with declining economic performance. Compares the performance of54 (18 franchisors; 18 fast‐food

Abstract

Fast‐food and franchising should present a formidable marriage when coping with declining economic performance. Compares the performance of 54 (18 franchisors; 18 fast‐food franchisees; 18 fast‐food companies) between 1987 and 1990 using Taffler′s Z‐score analysis. Finds that franchisors′ performance during the period declined but remained better than that of fast‐food franchisees and fast‐food companies. Fast‐food franchisees have remained buoyant but there are incidences of potential failures. Outlines differing solutions to return these companies to health.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2013

Evangelos L. Psomas, Dimitrios P. Kafetzopoulos and Christos V. Fotopoulos

The purpose of this paper is to develop an instrument that measures the effectiveness of the ISO 9001 Quality Management System (QMS), based on its components, meaning the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop an instrument that measures the effectiveness of the ISO 9001 Quality Management System (QMS), based on its components, meaning the ISO 9001 objectives; and to validate this instrument in the food manufacturing sector.

Design/methodology/approach

Bearing in mind the definition of “ISO 9001 effectiveness”, the ISO 9001 objectives and their indicators are identified in the literature. Based on these indicators, a measurement instrument is developed and then empirically validated through collecting preliminary data from 335 Greek food manufacturing small and medium‐sized enterprises (SMEs). After testing the assumptions of multivariate analysis, exploratory factor analysis as well as first and second order confirmatory factor analysis are applied.

Findings

The data collected reveal, as identified in the literature, the three‐dimensional nature of the ISO 9001 objectives (continuous improvement, prevention of nonconformities and customer satisfaction focus). The responding food manufacturing SMEs demonstrate a high level of achievement of these objectives. Further analysis of the data also reveals a valid latent factor reflecting the successful achievement of the ISO 9001 objectives, namely “ISO 9001 effectiveness”.

Research limitations/implications

The present study focuses on food manufacturing SMEs. Therefore, it is worth validating the measurement instrument on large food manufacturing companies, food service companies, companies of specific food sub‐sectors, non‐food companies and finally on companies operating in different economic conditions to Greece.

Practical implications

This measurement instrument can be used by a food manufacturing SME as a self assessment tool and a benchmarking tool. In doing so, suitable strategies can be selected in order for a food SME to improve quality, gain competitive advantage and overcome the current downturn.

Originality/value

In this paper, a measurement instrument is developed and validated in food manufacturing SMEs, based on measures describing the ISO 9001 objectives; in other words, ISO 9001 effectiveness.

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 24 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1997

Michael Heasman and Spencer Henson

Presents the results of a postal questionnaire to UK food and drink manufacturers on the costs of compliance with food regulation. In particular, the questionnaire focused…

Abstract

Presents the results of a postal questionnaire to UK food and drink manufacturers on the costs of compliance with food regulation. In particular, the questionnaire focused on the usefulness of compliance cost assessments ‐ introduced by the Government in 1985 across all government departments as an analytical tool for assessing the regulatory costs to business ‐ as they relate to food businesses. Explains that the questionnaire sought to establish to what extent food companies actually costed the impact of food regulation on their business operations and explored other aspects of food regulation, such as the benefits and constraints. Reports the results which gave some unexpected insights on the costs of compliance with food regulation. For example, the majority of respondents were not aware that the Ministry of Agriculture Fisheries and Food carried out compliance cost assessments on food regulation; around two‐thirds of the sample found it “difficult” or “very difficult” to identify where compliance costs would affect their company and an even greater proportion (more than three‐quarters) said they would have problems quantifying compliance costs. Concludes that the compliance cost assessment, as a tool for helping to analyse the cost of food regulation on businesses, is an inappropriate method for the food sector and the development of new methods should be considered.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 99 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 21 December 2020

Peter Jones and Daphne Comfort

The purpose of this review paper is to extend the literature on animal welfare in the hospitality industry by exploring how some of the major fast-food companies have…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this review paper is to extend the literature on animal welfare in the hospitality industry by exploring how some of the major fast-food companies have publicly addressed this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper reviews, and reflects on, the animal welfare statements and policies posted on the Internet by five major fast-food companies, namely, Yum! Brands, Restaurant Brands International, McDonald's, Domino's Pizza Group and Subway.

Findings

The findings reveal that four interlinked themes, namely, strategic corporate commitment, a focus on supply chains, policies on specific categories of animals and food products, and auditing, illustrated the selected companies approach to animal welfare. The authors also raise a number of issues about the selected companies' approaches to animal welfare including the aspirational nature of their commitments, the emphasis on regular audits, the role of external assurance in the reporting process, the role of animal welfare pressure groups and campaigns, and the impact of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19).

Research limitations/implications

The paper's empirical material is drawn from the corporate websites of five fast-food companies, but the paper has theoretical and practical implications and provides a platform for future research.

Originality/value

The paper offers a simple review of the way five major fast-food companies have addressed the issue of animal welfare.

Details

Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Insights, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9792

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Article
Publication date: 2 May 2017

Sarina Abdul Halim Lim, Jiju Antony, Zhen He and Norin Arshed

Statistical process control (SPC) is widely applied for control and improve processes in manufacturing, but very few studies have reported on the successful application of…

Abstract

Purpose

Statistical process control (SPC) is widely applied for control and improve processes in manufacturing, but very few studies have reported on the successful application of SPC in the food industry, in particular. The purpose of this paper is to critically assess the status of SPC in the UK food manufacturing industry and to suggest future research avenues.

Design/methodology/approach

A research project was carried out in the UK food manufacturing sector through questionnaires. The results of the study were analysed using descriptive statistics and statistical tests to be applied in the hypothesis testing.

Findings

Findings revealed that 45 per cent of the respondents are SPC users and x ¯ -R and x ¯ -S charts are the most commonly applied SPC charts in this industry. It was determined that top management commitment is the most critical factor, while lack of SPC training is the most alarming challenge, and lack of awareness of SPC and its benefits are the main reasons for the food companies not implementing SPC.

Research limitations/implications

The study considered only the food manufacturing companies. Future research could be addressed toward the food service and food supply chain.

Practical implications

The paper provides information to food companies in the UK on most common practiced and important quality tools, SPC charts and critical success factors in the food industry. Moreover, the most challenging factors of SPC implementation in the food industry are presented.

Originality/value

This study depicted the current state of SPC practices in the food industry and the process performance in SPC and non-SPC companies is compared.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 34 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

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Article
Publication date: 5 August 2014

Evangelos Psomas, Fotis Vouzas and Dimitrios Kafetzopoulos

The purpose of the paper is to examine the binary character of total quality management (TQM) in food companies and to determine the impact of the two aspects of TQM – the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the paper is to examine the binary character of total quality management (TQM) in food companies and to determine the impact of the two aspects of TQM – the “soft” and “hard” – on the quality management benefits.

Design/methodology/approach

A research project was carried out in 90 Greek food companies, using the questionnaire method. Two measurement models have been formulated. The first model includes the TQM philosophical elements and quality tools/techniques, while the second model includes the quality management benefits. Exploratory factor analyses are applied to extract the latent factors. The factors that significantly influence the quality management benefits are determined through multiple linear regression analyses.

Findings

The analysis of the models confirms the binary character of TQM (the “soft” and “hard” TQM elements) in food companies and the existence of internal and external quality management benefits. The “soft” TQM elements have a significant direct impact on quality improvement, employee benefits and customer satisfaction. However, the impact of the “hard” TQM elements on the above quality management benefits is not direct but indirect, through their significant correlation with the “soft” TQM elements. Finally, quality improvement is also a significant factor that directly influences employee benefits, customer satisfaction and business performance.

Research limitations/implications

The small size of the sample of the responding food companies, the diversity of these companies and the subjective character of the data collected are limitations that suggest future research recommendations.

Practical implications

Food companies should realize the leading role of the “soft” aspect of TQM and the supporting role of the “hard” aspect in maximizing the quality management benefits and as a consequence in withstanding the current economic downturn.

Originality/value

Focusing on “quality-oriented” food companies that have ample experience in quality and food safety management systems, the present study reveals a significant direct impact of the “soft” TQM elements and an indirect impact of the “hard” TQM elements on the quality management benefits.

Details

The TQM Journal, vol. 26 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2731

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Article
Publication date: 13 April 2018

Gino Marchet, Marco Melacini, Sara Perotti, Monica Rasini and Elena Tappia

Companies are currently moving from multi-channel strategies to offer their customers an omni-channel (OC) experience. So far, OC research has been mainly tackled from a…

Abstract

Purpose

Companies are currently moving from multi-channel strategies to offer their customers an omni-channel (OC) experience. So far, OC research has been mainly tackled from a sales-based view, with numerous operational challenges to be fully investigated yet. The purpose of this paper is to investigate how companies set the logistics variables in their OC management strategy and the business logistics models currently most adopted.

Design/methodology/approach

A two-step methodology was adopted. First, a systematic combining approach with scientific literature review and case studies allowed to derive a framework for classifying the key logistics variables and the related options. The framework was then used to conduct a qualitative survey targeting 92 Italian companies operating in food manufacturing, food retailing and non-food retailing. Collected data were analysed by means of cluster analysis.

Findings

Implementing an OC management strategy requires to set 11 logistics variables belonging to four strategic areas: delivery service, distribution setting, fulfilment strategy and returns management. A broad empirical investigation showed the choices made by companies when setting the logistics variables to implement an OC management strategy. Lastly, four business logistics models, differing in terms of both business sector and OC maturity, were discussed.

Originality/value

The proposed framework extends earlier studies by including additional significant logistics variables. The empirical analysis provides new insights on how to re-structure the business logistics model in OC, suggesting channel integration and the coexistence of multiple configurations as main enablers of an OC proposition.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 48 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

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Article
Publication date: 11 May 2012

Anni‐Kaisa Kähkönen

The study aims to discuss the new value creation logic of value nets and analyze the characteristics of value nets in the context of the food industry. Previous research…

Abstract

Purpose

The study aims to discuss the new value creation logic of value nets and analyze the characteristics of value nets in the context of the food industry. Previous research has shown that along with the growing importance of networking, the value creation logic is also changing from traditional chains to dynamic networks. The objective of this study is to define the characteristics of value nets and to analyze the suitability of the value net as a value creation and business model in the food industry.

Design/methodology/approach

The study utilizes a case research as a method and analyzes a value net from the Finnish food industry. The empirical data comprises 29 individual semi‐structured interviews conducted with the personnel of four case companies.

Findings

The findings of the study suggest that the value net as a business model and value creation model is also suitable for food sector companies. The value net has several characteristics that were found to be significant and useful for food companies. Moreover, food companies can obtain remarkable benefits by utilizing value nets.

Practical implications

The results of the study carry implications for managers and practitioners in terms of shedding light on the value net as a value creation model and business model in the food industry. Managers need to be aware of the developments in value creation logic and recognize that value can no longer be added in a sequential chain, but the perspective should move towards networks in which value is co‐created by the network actors.

Originality/value

Thus far, studies on value nets have concentrated mainly on the ICT sector and there is a limited amount of research on the food industry. The food sector, therefore, offers a new empirical context in which to conduct research on value nets. Food companies are focusing more and more on value creation and networking, and the research of value nets is therefore highly relevant to the business development of the food industry.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 114 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 9 March 2015

Inga-Lena Darkow, Bernadette Foerster and Heiko A. von der Gracht

This study aims to examine the management of food supply chains in complex and volatile business environments, where the sustainability requirements of customers and…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the management of food supply chains in complex and volatile business environments, where the sustainability requirements of customers and legislation are increasing. This challenging situation gives rise to the question as to how a logistics company can achieve and sustain competitive advantage through environmentally-oriented sustainability.

Design/methodology/approach

This empirical study gathers insights on emerging practices in European food service supply chains from two parallel Delphi surveys conducted with 145 industry experts from 27 countries. The long-term industry expectations of a leading provider in food service logistics are compared with an industry-wide external panel. The questions were designed to understand how managers perceive the emerging domain of sustainability in supply chains.

Findings

Environmentally oriented sustainability will remain a key driver of success in the field. However, after applying the dominant logic concept for analyzing results, it becomes apparent that managers have to continuously challenge internal existing expectations to translate an emerging domain into strategy. We show how the senior management team under investigation was challenged in its dominant logic and how it tried to overcome this situation during strategy development.

Originality/value

The study shows how managers perceive and cope with the emerging domain of environmentally oriented sustainability, how they translate it into strategy, and utilize resources for creating customer value. The research supports managers in adapting to new competitive environments. Furthermore, the study contributes by visualizing the dominant logic of a firm and the approach of top management for adjustment.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 20 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

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Article
Publication date: 29 November 2018

Andreas Souliotis, Katerina Giazitzi and George Boskou

The purpose of this paper is to develop and implement methods to benchmark the food safety and hygiene of different companies, regardless the management systems applied.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop and implement methods to benchmark the food safety and hygiene of different companies, regardless the management systems applied.

Design/methodology/approach

The data were collected using a balanced questionnaire which was based on the fishbone model of Ishikawa. The questionnaire includes general questions about the company and 25 questions about personnel, machinery, materials, methods and environment. It was applied to 202 food industries, 42 food retail businesses and 49 food service companies. The data were collected from interviews of industry people related to food safety and from audits of business facilities. The benchmarking methods were descriptive statistics, radar charts, cluster analysis and association rules.

Findings

The radar charts were used to benchmark food companies on safety and hygiene. Food companies can be evaluated with this benchmarking tool with a balanced score of maximum 100 points.

Originality/value

This benchmarking tool could be useful for food control authorities, clusters of companies and certification bodies.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 25 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

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