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Article
Publication date: 9 October 2019

Ulrike Gretzel, Jamie Murphy, Juho Pesonen and Casey Blanton

This paper aims to provide a perspective on food waste by tourists and tourist households, now and in the future.

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide a perspective on food waste by tourists and tourist households, now and in the future.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a perspective article that summarizes contemporary thinking about food waste and conceptualizes food waste specifically for tourist household settings.

Findings

In tourism, food is more than nourishment and extends to visitor experiences and attractions. Yet food waste arising from tourism activity is a major environmental and societal issue. Festive moods and holiday spirits – synonymous with over-sized portions, bountiful buffets and entertainment excess – exacerbate food waste. Cultural norms that portray food waste as a sign of good hospitality further aggravate the problem. This paper argues that efforts to reduce food waste in tourism require new conceptualizations of tourist households, and where food waste occurs in relation to tourism, and of who should be responsible for preventing and managing food waste.

Research limitations/implications

The tourism industry faces ever-growing economical, societal and legislative reasons to address food waste, which are dynamic and difficult to predict.

Practical implications

Savvy meal providers will migrate towards reducing their food waste or turning it into assets. However, a focus on preventing food waste only in traditional food service and accommodation establishments ignores the reality of growing tourist households and will stifle sustainability efforts unless theoretically unpacked and practically addressed.

Social implications

A third of food produced globally is lost or wasted. Stark facts, proclamations and regulations underscore food waste as a burgeoning global problem with major environmental, social and economic costs.

Originality/value

Food waste, in general, and by tourists, is a burgeoning environmental, social and economic challenge. This is one of the first articles to focus on this topic and introduces the concept of tourist households.

Details

Tourism Review, vol. 75 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1660-5373

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Book part
Publication date: 12 January 2016

David R. Just and Jeffrey M. Swigert

Little work has directly addressed the potential to control food waste. This chapter focuses on behavioral nudges and their potential to reduce food waste and, in turn…

Abstract

Purpose

Little work has directly addressed the potential to control food waste. This chapter focuses on behavioral nudges and their potential to reduce food waste and, in turn, implications for food security.

Methodology/approach

Key methodological and definitional challenges that must be met to make effective use of interventions to reduce food waste are examined. Chief among these challenges are determining welfare measures that are robust to the behavioral anomalies and apparently inconsistent preferences observed under behavioral interventions.

Findings

Targeted reductions in food waste can be significantly impacted by simple behavioral interventions either in institutional settings or within the home. Some evidence suggests that food waste is rampant not only in developed countries, but also among developing countries.

Practical implications

Our findings highlight the need to create a research program addressing the behavioral causes of food waste both in developed and developing country contexts.

Details

Food Security in a Food Abundant World
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-215-3

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2014

Wayne Martindale

The purpose of this paper is to define the sustainability attributes of frozen and fresh food consumption in a typical household. The reason for writing this paper is that…

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7835

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to define the sustainability attributes of frozen and fresh food consumption in a typical household. The reason for writing this paper is that food preservation is often overlooked when developing sustainability strategies.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses established carbon footprint data for specific food types and consumer survey data to determine how consumers use fresh and frozen products in the home. Consumption and waste data for 83 households was obtained using a combination of narrative and graphical association questions.

Findings

The results show greenhouse gas emissions associated with a diets containing frozen food are reduced because 47 per cent less frozen foods is wasted as compared to fresh foods with a typical household wasting 10.4 per cent of fresh food and 5.9 per cent frozen food.

Research limitations/implications

This research has highlighted the importance of understanding the waste impacts of catering and food service consumption outside the home.

Practical implications

This research will guide future product development for frozen foods with regard to dietary planning and portion control.

Social implications

The cost and sustainability benefits of meal planning are identified and these will inform policy making and education to improve dietary choices.

Originality/value

This work extends the scope of current consumer surveys that assess quality, value and taste attributes to sustainability criteria and it will enable collaboration between fresh and frozen product categories to deliver sustainable dietary options.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 116 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 30 September 2021

Chai Wen Teoh, Kian Yeik Koay and Pei Sun Chai

This research aims to investigate consumers' food waste prevention behaviour through the lens of an extended theory of planned behaviour. The extension includes the…

Abstract

Purpose

This research aims to investigate consumers' food waste prevention behaviour through the lens of an extended theory of planned behaviour. The extension includes the examination of the role of social media usage in affecting consumers' decision-making process of food waste prevention behaviour.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey questionnaire is developed based on measurement items of previously validated studies. 210 samples are collected and analysed using partial least squares structural equation modelling (PLS-SEM).

Findings

The results show that social media usage has a significant influence on attitude and injunctive norms. In addition, intention can be predicted by injunctive norms, moral norms and perceived behavioural control but not attitude. Lastly, the intention to reduce food waste is a significant predictor of food waste prevention behaviour.

Originality/value

Overall, the extended theory of planned behaviour is useful in explaining consumers' food waste prevention behaviour. Interestingly, this study reveals that a negative attitude towards food waste behaviour does not translate into the intention to engage in food waste prevention behaviour. Furthermore, it is found that social media usage plays a significant in shaping consumers' attitudes towards food waste and injunctive norms.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Abstract

Purpose

The current pilot study explored food insecurity, food waste, food related behaviours and cooking confidence of UK consumers following the COVID-19 lockdown.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 473 UK-based consumers (63% female) in March 2020. A cross-sectional online survey measured variables including food insecurity prevalence, self-reported food waste, food management behaviours, confidence and frequency of use of a range of cooking methods, type of food eaten (ultra-processed, semi-finished, unprocessed) and packaging type foods are purchased in.

Findings

39% of participants have experienced some food insecurity in the last 12 months. Being younger, having a greater BMI and living in a smaller household were associated with food insecurity. Green leaves, carrots, potatoes and sliced bread are the most wasted of purchased foods. Polenta, green leaves and white rice are the most wasted cooked foods. Food secure participants reported wasting a smaller percentage of purchased and cooked foods compared to food insecure participants. Overall, participants were most confident about boiling, microwaving and stir-frying and least confident with using a pressure cooker or sous vide. Food secure participants were more confident with boiling, stir-frying, grilling and roasting than insecure food participants.

Practical implications

This has implications for post lockdown policy, including food policies and guidance for public-facing communications.

Originality/value

We identified novel differences in self-report food waste behaviours and cooking confidence between the food secure and insecure consumers and observed demographics associated with food insecurity.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 123 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 14 September 2021

Claudia Cozzio, Oksana Tokarchuk and Oswin Maurer

The purpose of this study is to investigate how hotel guests can be nudged for more active engagement in hospitality plate waste prevention and moderation at buffets…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate how hotel guests can be nudged for more active engagement in hospitality plate waste prevention and moderation at buffets, through designing effective persuasive interventions. Plate waste is a main sustainability challenge, and it is considered one of the major drivers of food waste in the hospitality sector, whose operations generate excessive amounts of waste. The hospitality industry, featured by all-you-can-eat buffet-style settings, is somehow encouraging consumers to increase the amount of food ordered or taken and not been eaten.

Design/methodology/approach

This study reports a field experiment conducted in a real hotel setting, where persuasive interventions were targeted to consumers at the croissants buffet, when guests were making their selections. The research tests the persuasiveness of functional and experiential appeal messages to nudge hotel guests towards a more active engagement in avoiding plate waste. Each single treatment was carried out for three weeks in varying sequence.

Findings

The findings are based on 63 rounds of data collections and show the superiority of experiential appeal messages in positively influencing guests’ behaviour. This implies that appropriate messages can persuade tourists to avoid plate waste in buffet-style settings, especially if these messages are grounded in participatory cues with an emphasis on altruistic values.

Originality/value

This is one of the few studies that empirically tests the effectiveness of different persuasive interventions in a real consumption setting, thus measuring actual behaviours which have been rarely studied. This study further contributes to the identification of concrete communication tools that can help to mitigate plate waste generation.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 123 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 6 August 2021

Eluiza Alberto de Morais Watanabe, Caroline Rodrigues do Nascimento, Michele Gasparoto Moreira Teixeira de Freitas and Mayra Monteiro Viana

Sustainable food consumption is crucial to protect the environment and to promote a better quality of life. Our study analyses and compares the causes, perceived…

Abstract

Purpose

Sustainable food consumption is crucial to protect the environment and to promote a better quality of life. Our study analyses and compares the causes, perceived consequences of food waste and practices to mitigate it in supermarkets and restaurants.

Design/methodology/approach

We conducted 17 semi-structured interviews with managers or other responsible persons with mastery of information about food waste of restaurants (self-service and à la carte) and supermarkets. The data were analysed via thematic content analysis.

Findings

The leading causes of food waste for the interviewed supermarkets and restaurants were improper handling by the staff, ineffective stock control management and lack of employee training. Supermarkets perceived other causes such as inadequate food packaging, refrigeration and temperature issues and dishonesty of carriers. The perceived consequences of food waste were mainly related to the economic aspect. Regarding adopting practices to reduce waste, some highlights are employee training, waste management by a specialized employee, assertive demand forecasting, meal preparation in the store and food donation. Just the supermarkets employ price reduction as a practice to reduce food waste. We concluded that, in general, supermarkets perceive more causes for waste than restaurants but do not necessarily present practices to mitigate these additional causes.

Originality/value

This research expanded the scope of studies about food waste and reveals procedures that those in charge can implement to reduce food waste. Our study analysed the causes, practices and consequences of food waste in two types of food channels (supermarkets and restaurants, in different formats). The literature does not clearly disclose aspects assigned to different food marketing channels, especially in emerging economies.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 18 August 2021

Wei-Zhi Ang, Suresh Narayanan and Meenchee Hong

Food wastage is a major contributor to pervasive world hunger. Cutting global food waste in half by 2030 is one of the United Nation's top priorities. Hence, this paper…

Abstract

Purpose

Food wastage is a major contributor to pervasive world hunger. Cutting global food waste in half by 2030 is one of the United Nation's top priorities. Hence, this paper aims to provide useful insights on how individual behavior might be influenced to help reduce food wastage and hunger by identifying individual food waste determinants.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 297 useable responses were obtained from a survey using a food diary method. A logit model was employed to estimate the relationship between leftovers and its determinants (preparedness to take own action, price conscious, food review, religiosity, health conscious, cost, marital status and gender).

Findings

Results show that preparedness to be responsible for one's actions, depending on food reviews and being waste conscious had a significant positive relationship with food waste reducing behavior, along with being male and being married.

Research limitations/implications

The study suggests that there is scope for policy initiatives to reduce the individual utility from discarding food and increase the individual utility from food saving activities. Penalizing individual or household food wastage through a tax will directly raise the cost of wastage and reduce the net utility from discarding food. Reducing food waste could help reduce global hunger.

Originality/value

Rationally, no one will have any intention to waste when buying food. Instead, in the context of deciding whether or not to leave leftover food, an individual is posited to weigh the potential utility from saving food or throwing it away. Thus, this study examines food waste behavior by utilizing economic tools, which is rare in the food waste literature.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 123 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 2 July 2021

Gülmüş Börühan and Melisa Ozbiltekin-Pala

The study analysed the amount of plate waste in a university refectory in Izmir, Turkey to find ways of minimizing plate waste in the university, providing sustainability…

Abstract

Purpose

The study analysed the amount of plate waste in a university refectory in Izmir, Turkey to find ways of minimizing plate waste in the university, providing sustainability and contributing to the development of circular economy and raising awareness about the plate waste problem.

Design/methodology/approach

Observation and semi-structured interviews were used to determine the volume of plate waste and level of awareness of academicians, students and administrative staff and suggest sustainable solutions for food waste in university refectories. The data gained from the semi-structured interviews were analysed with qualitative analysis software (MAXQDA®).

Findings

Plate waste in the university's refectories is increasing due to the lack of precautionary measures. Academicians, students and administrative staff all showed low awareness rates.

Originality/value

This study is original in investigating theoretically and empirically one of the main reasons for food waste, namely plate waste in mass consumption sites, and evaluating the effect of food waste from an economic, social and environmental perspective.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 23 June 2021

Natapol Thongplew, Nadtaya Duangput and Sasimaporn Khodkham

This study aims to explore ways to minimize plate waste at university canteens by studying plate waste and consumers at three main canteens of a university, Thailand.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore ways to minimize plate waste at university canteens by studying plate waste and consumers at three main canteens of a university, Thailand.

Design/methodology/approach

Using university canteens in Thailand as a case, plate waste was characterized and quantified and consumers’ insights concerning food consumption practices were examined through focus group discussion.

Findings

The results revealed that each consumer wasted edible food around 19 grams/meal. The generation of plate waste is affected by the food provision system, including canteen setting, food purchasing procedure and food quality. In addition, the presence of stray dogs in the canteens inhibited consumers from finishing up their food. Thus, improving the food provision system is crucial to engage consumers in achieving zero plate waste.

Originality/value

This research sheds some light on ways to engage consumers in sustainable consumption and contributes to the knowledge on plate waste and sustainable consumption in university settings. Improving food quality and canteen settings are of importance to better engage consumers. In addition, this research revealed that concepts of system of provision and citizen-consumers are practical to analyze sustainable transformations for green university initiatives.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

Keywords

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