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Article
Publication date: 5 February 2018

Yeonsoo Kim and Mari Luz Zapata Ramos

The purpose of this paper is to examine how stakeholders perceive the motives behind fast food companies’ public health-related corporate social responsibility (CSR) and…

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2390

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine how stakeholders perceive the motives behind fast food companies’ public health-related corporate social responsibility (CSR) and general social issue-related CSR initiatives, and their responses toward CSR in terms of supportive communication intent, investment intent, and purchase intent. The authors further examine the impact of perceived CSR motives on intent and whether a healthier chain image has an effect on stakeholder responses.

Design/methodology/approach

An online experiment was conducted. This study employed a randomized 2 (CSR type: health-related CSR vs generic social issue-related CSR)×2 (chain image: healthier chain vs general fast-food chain) full factorial design using general stakeholder samples.

Findings

For an ordinary fast food restaurant, generic social issue-related CSR programs elicited significantly more positive perceptions of CSR motives, supportive communication intent and investment intent, than public-health related CSR. When a company has a healthier image, stakeholders do not distinguish between CSR types. Stakeholders perceive both CSR types as stemming from mutually beneficial motives and show neutral to slightly positive reactions to both CSR. A positively perceived CSR motive plays a determinant role in anticipating communication, investment, and purchase intents.

Originality/value

This is the first study that examines stakeholder perception of motives behind and responses toward fast food chains’ health-related vs generic social issue-related CSR initiatives, in light of corporate image. The study findings help public relations practitioners, public health professionals, parent groups, and legislators understand stakeholders’ reactions toward CSR initiatives in the fast food industry and help them monitor practices for improvements.

Details

Corporate Communications: An International Journal, vol. 23 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1356-3289

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Article
Publication date: 26 October 2012

Blessing Maumbe

The purpose of this paper is to describe the rise of South Africa's quick service restaurant (QSR) industry by examining the structural changes and competitive strategies…

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6217

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe the rise of South Africa's quick service restaurant (QSR) industry by examining the structural changes and competitive strategies driving the industry.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses Michael Porter's Five Forces and secondary data to describe the structural reorganization of South Africa's QSR industry and market positioning strategies being used to respond to the growing industry competition and global challenges.

Findings

The paper finds that South Africa's QSR industry has risen tremendously and has expanded globally. The evolving fast food market comprises South African franchises and multi‐national franchise corporations co‐existing with modern supermarkets, contract food caterers, and informal traders. The industry uses a mix of market coordination, operational and competitive strategies to counter the intense global competition. Further research is needed to examine the potential of information communication technologies in QSR industry market coordination and consumer willingness to pay for increased convenience, healthy products, sustainability, and food traceability.

Practical implications

South Africa leads the continent in mobile phone penetration and there is scope for QSR managers to integrate mobile commerce when dealing with QSR industry customers and other stakeholders. South Africa's fast food franchises should craft strategies that adapt menus to local cultures and ethnic foods in other countries. With increasing attention on food safety and traceability, South Africa's QSR firms could provide leadership in marketing high quality food and gain competitive advantages through positive industry image.

Originality/value

The paper addresses the highly topical issue of rising competition in the fast food industry and successful strategies being utilized by South African firms to penetrate both regional and global markets.

Details

Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-0839

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1992

Stuart Price and John Lawson

The fast food industry has become a focus of media criticism forits apparent lack of interest in environmental and nutritional issues.Demonstrates the scale of the industry

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2486

Abstract

The fast food industry has become a focus of media criticism for its apparent lack of interest in environmental and nutritional issues. Demonstrates the scale of the industry′s response and provides an objective assessment of current initiatives which have been specifically designed to improve the image of fast food companies. The greatest momentum for change has inevitably been associated with the major American fast food chains which are introducing more environmentally‐friendly packaging, accessory‐recycling and lower fat products. In the process they are gaining a competitive advantage over smaller domestic fast food companies and this fact alone will ensure the introduction of more initiatives in the future. Care for the environment and for consumer health have consequently become high‐profile marketing concerns.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 92 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2006

Cameron Allan, Greg J. Bamber and Nils Timo

McJobs in the fast‐food sector are a major area of youth employment. This paper explores young people's perceptions of work in this industry.

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18435

Abstract

Purpose

McJobs in the fast‐food sector are a major area of youth employment. This paper explores young people's perceptions of work in this industry.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper discusses the results of a survey of students' experiences of McJobs in Australia.

Findings

Fast‐food workers were generally dissatisfied with the industrial relations and work organisation aspects of their jobs. Nonetheless, they were generally much more satisfied with the human resource management and social relations aspects of their jobs.

Research limitations/implications

Our research has implications for understanding the human capital development practices adopted by employers in the fast‐food industry and in other sectors, especially those that employ young people. Much of the context for work and employment relations in Australia is comparable with those in most English‐speaking countries. Therefore, our findings have implications for work in similar sectors in other countries, in particular, other English‐speaking countries.

Practical implications

This paper has implications for people who devise recruitment policies and design of jobs. It is a useful reminder that it is no longer appropriate for people to talk in simple terms of satisfaction at work per se; it is vital to differentiate between various aspects and contexts of job satisfaction, or the of the lack of it.

Originality/value

Earlier studies of fast‐food work have tended to be polemical and polarized: either apologias or very critical. This paper adopts a more balanced approach and it puts the findings into context.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 28 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1993

Stuart Price

Fast‐food and franchising should present a formidable marriage whencoping with declining economic performance. Compares the performance of54 (18 franchisors; 18 fast‐food

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2096

Abstract

Fast‐food and franchising should present a formidable marriage when coping with declining economic performance. Compares the performance of 54 (18 franchisors; 18 fast‐food franchisees; 18 fast‐food companies) between 1987 and 1990 using Taffler′s Z‐score analysis. Finds that franchisors′ performance during the period declined but remained better than that of fast‐food franchisees and fast‐food companies. Fast‐food franchisees have remained buoyant but there are incidences of potential failures. Outlines differing solutions to return these companies to health.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 21 June 2011

Ritu Anand

The purpose of this case study is to explore and study the determinants (demographics and psychographics) impacting consumers food choice towards fast food in India.

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7382

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this case study is to explore and study the determinants (demographics and psychographics) impacting consumers food choice towards fast food in India.

Design/methodology/approach

Food choice variables have been explored using literature reviews and exploratory survey of young consumers in the age group of 20‐40. Data obtained from the reliable sources (e.g. the World Health Organisation, Euromonitor International and Datamonitor International) have been used to study the implications of consumer food choice and growing trend towards organic food.

Findings

Based on literature reviews and exploratory surveys, the key determinants impacting consumers food choice are passion for eating out, socialize, ambience and taste for school and college goers and convenience for dual‐income families in urban India. Findings indicate that fast food companies can no longer rely on convenience as USP in India, unless the implications of same on consumers health is given equal importance in the years to come.

Research limitations/implications

Data obtained from the convenience sample and literature reviews have been generalized for inferring consumption patterns of Indian consumers (population).

Practical implications

This case study focuses on growing trends towards organic food and green consumerism in view of rising global obesity with fast food consumption in Western countries and significantly very less in India despite obesity being an epidemic in India.

Originality/value

This paper focuses on determining a food choice model in wake of changing food and eating habits in India, using literature reviews, exploratory surveys and reliable data sources.

Details

Society and Business Review, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5680

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2004

Jennifer Mueller and Brian H. Kleiner

The Fair Labour Standards Act is a law that determines whether an employee is considered exempt or non‐exempt. Non‐exempt employees are eligible for overtime pay (time and…

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1889

Abstract

The Fair Labour Standards Act is a law that determines whether an employee is considered exempt or non‐exempt. Non‐exempt employees are eligible for overtime pay (time and a half) versus exempt employees, which are not eligible for overtime pay. The Fair Labour Standards Act status is based upon job duties rather than job title. An employee is considered exempt if he/she falls into either the professional, administrative, or executive exempt categories meeting all criteria. Many positions in the fast food industry are paid the minimum wage, or close to it, due to the intense competition and low profit margins in the industry (Reynolds, 2002). In addition, many of the employees are nonexempt employees and must punch in and out on a time clock. The positions available in the fast food restaurants themselves do not meet the criteria to be exempt due to the highly routine work they perform, with the exception of some management positions.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 27 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

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Article
Publication date: 2 April 2015

R.K. Srivastava

The purpose of this paper is to study differing demographic factors affecting fast-food customers loyalty towards national or international fast food chains. It also…

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5338

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study differing demographic factors affecting fast-food customers loyalty towards national or international fast food chains. It also compares the variation between global and local fast food chains as the products offered are culturally different.

Design/methodology/approach

A variety of variables used to gain a holistic view, which includes factors such as quality, price, food and demographic profile of consumers affecting loyalty of fast food chains. The study adopts the theory and method of the trust-commitment-loyalty explanation chain and examines the consumer survey adapted from Fast food by Sahagun et al. (2014). The present analyses 542 filled questionnaires in which systematic sampling is used. Systematic sampling procedure is adopted.

Findings

Indians prefer global fast food chains compared to Indian fast food chains. Loyalty towards global brands is higher than that for Indian brands because they are found to be of better quality which leads to higher frequency of visit and recommendation of the brands to their friends and colleagues. There are ethnic variations towards global and Indian fast food chains. Global brand of food chains generated more good word of mouth publicity compared to Indian food chains. Demographic factors play a role in the patronage of fast food chains.

Research limitations/implications

One of the limitations of this research is the study adapts the theory and method of the trust-commitment-loyalty explanation chain and examines the consumer survey adapted from a study of Sahagun et al. (2014) on fast food for emerging markets. Only India is studied, but the addition of other countries like Brazil, China, Russia and South Africa can add value.

Practical implications

Fast food managers had to illustrate the satisfaction on affective response, such as quality of food, convenient location, variety, service and value for money. Demographic variables like gender, age, education, income and ethnicity, global and local Brand will affect the perceptions.

Originality/value

This is the first attempt to study the loyalty of consumers in emerging markets, which is witnessing the entry of many fast food global chains. It studies the demographic variables effect on the loyalty and the behaviour of consumers and compares to local and global brand fast food chains. The research will be use to global managers who are planning to expand in emerging markets like India.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 117 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2003

Terry Lam and Hanqin Qiu Zhang

Studies of new employees’ socialization have gained importance in the fast food industry in view of the demand for high quality service in this increasingly competitive…

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11824

Abstract

Studies of new employees’ socialization have gained importance in the fast food industry in view of the demand for high quality service in this increasingly competitive business environment. New employees in the industry are unique in terms of job expectations. The aim of this study was to investigate the unmet expectations of new employees, and the relationships between unmet expectations, job satisfaction and organizational commitment in the Hong Kong fast food industry. A sample of 203 employees from the industry was collected. The results show that expectations are normally unmet, and job characteristics, training and development, and compensation and fairness are related to satisfaction and commitment.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 19 September 2019

Mohammed Belal Uddin

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the factors influencing the satisfaction of customer and customer loyalty in the fast food restaurant industry. A theoretical…

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1355

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the factors influencing the satisfaction of customer and customer loyalty in the fast food restaurant industry. A theoretical model, including hypotheses, has been proposed in this study.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were assembled using convenient sampling method. The hypothesized model was verified with the data from 204 respondents. Principal component analysis and structural equation modeling approach were applied to analyze data.

Findings

The results (significant at p<0.01 and p<0.05) exhibited that food quality, price and service quality were positively linked to customer satisfaction. Customer satisfaction was positively associated with customer loyalty. The empirical results found a contrary association between the location and environment of restaurant and customer satisfaction.

Practical implications

The managers and owners of fast food restaurants may use the results of this study to confirm customer satisfaction and loyalty of the customer. With loyal customer groups, their businesses can be sustained and gradually grown up.

Originality/value

This study will provide guidelines for the management of fast food restaurants to formulate their business strategies in the competitive market. It will give a signal to the managers to stay focused on customer relationship management as the ultimate goal of the business.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 121 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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