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Article
Publication date: 12 November 2021

Ulrike Fasbender, Fabiola H. Gerpott and Dana Unger

Knowledge exchange between older and younger employees enhances the collective memory of an organization and therefore contributes to its business success. The purpose of…

Abstract

Purpose

Knowledge exchange between older and younger employees enhances the collective memory of an organization and therefore contributes to its business success. The purpose of this paper is to take a motivational perspective to better understand why older and younger employees share and receive knowledge with and from each other. Specifically, this study focuses on generativity striving – the motivation to teach, train and guide others – as well as development striving – the motivation to grow, increase competence and master something new – and argues that both motives need to be considered to fully understand intergenerational knowledge exchange.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper takes a dyadic approach to disentangle how older employees’ knowledge sharing is linked to their younger colleagues’ knowledge receiving and vice versa. The study applied an actor-partner interdependence model based on survey data from 145 age-diverse coworker dyads to test the hypotheses.

Findings

Results showed that older and younger employees’ generativity striving affected their knowledge sharing, which, in turn, predicted their colleagues’ knowledge receiving. Moreover, the study found that younger employees were more likely to receive knowledge that their older colleagues shared with them when they scored higher (vs lower) on development striving.

Originality/value

By studying the age-specific dyadic cross-over between knowledge sharing and knowledge receiving, this research adds to the knowledge exchange literature. This study challenges the current age-blind view on knowledge exchange motivation and provides novel insights into the interplay of motivational forces involved in knowledge exchange between older and younger employees.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 25 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 26 August 2021

Emanuela Rondi and Paola Rovelli

This paper aims to examine the influence that family firms’ top management team (TMT) behavior and characteristics exert on their innovation opportunity realization.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the influence that family firms’ top management team (TMT) behavior and characteristics exert on their innovation opportunity realization.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected through a survey addressed to a representative sample of Italian firms. The analyzed sample consists of 237 firms, 120 of which are family firms. A series of ordinary least squares models were used to test the four hypotheses.

Findings

Family firms realize fewer innovation opportunities than non-family firms. This result is fully mediated by the knowledge exchange in the TMT as follows: in family firms, the TMT exchanges less knowledge than in non-family firms, which drives their lower realization of innovation opportunities. In family firms TMT, the increase in the non-family members positively influences the TMT knowledge exchange, but only when the time the Chief Executive Officer (CEO) spends in searching for innovation opportunities outside the firm is low. The more the CEO search increases, the more this positive influence decreases, up to the point it becomes negative.

Research limitations/implications

The study contributes to the literature on innovation, knowledge management and organizational design in family firms. Nevertheless, data were collected at a single point in time and in a single country.

Practical implications

The study suggests family firms on how to foster the realization of innovation opportunities. A greater TMT knowledge exchange allows to realize more innovation opportunities and the TMT characteristics emerged as the drivers of this TMT knowledge exchange. As such, family firms should examine the interaction of their TMT composition in terms of non-family and family members with the effort that the CEO deploys to search for innovation opportunities outside the firm.

Originality/value

Empirical investigation of the link between family ownership, absorptive capacity and innovation performance by considering TMT behavior and characteristics.

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Article
Publication date: 2 March 2021

María Redondo, Carmen Camarero and Peter van der Sijde

University business incubators (UBIs) are born as tools of the academic world to market research results, for the transfer of technology and to promote entrepreneurial…

Abstract

Purpose

University business incubators (UBIs) are born as tools of the academic world to market research results, for the transfer of technology and to promote entrepreneurial spirit. In these contexts, the exchange of knowledge among entrepreneurs can be a key variable for the development and success of their businesses. This paper aims to analyse the characteristics of entrepreneurs' resources and the institutional logic that prevails in the incubator as determinants of the exchange of knowledge, and the authors examine the results in terms of entrepreneurial commitment and the generation of innovations.

Design/methodology/approach

The empirical study carried out on a sample of 101 entrepreneurs in UBIs in Spain and The Netherlands.

Findings

The results reveals how complementarity, supplementarity and transferability of resources, as well as incubator predisposition towards business are fundamental for the exchange of knowledge, the development of entrepreneurial spirit and the generation of innovation.

Originality/value

This study makes a contribution towards an understanding of how relationships between university entrepreneurs provide access to and help create useful knowledge for the parties, with this resource constituting one possible source of sustainable competitive advantage.

Details

European Journal of Innovation Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-1060

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Article
Publication date: 29 June 2020

I.M.S. Weerasinghe and H.H. Dedunu

This study aims to identify the effect of demographic factors on the relationship between academic contribution and university–industry knowledge exchange in Sri Lanka.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to identify the effect of demographic factors on the relationship between academic contribution and university–industry knowledge exchange in Sri Lanka.

Design/methodology/approach

This study is of quantitative and explanatory type , which applied the deductive research method, and is conducted with minimum interference of researcher taking individual academics as the unit of analysis. The study collected data from 178 academics randomly through a structured questionnaire designed to analyze through statistical package for the social sciences and analysis of a moment structure statistical software. A structural equation model is applied to collected data to explore the moderating impact of the demographic factor on the university–industry knowledge exchange.

Findings

Overall involvement of academic staff in joint research, contract research, human resource mobility and the training with industry were was low in Sri Lanka. However, all four independent variables significantly associated with the knowledge exchange process from which only joint research and training had a statistically significant effect on university–industry knowledge exchange . Concerning demographic factors, only the quality of academic research significantly moderated the relationship between academic contribution and university–industry knowledge exchange process in Sri Lanka.

Research limitations/implications

This study considered only the university side of the university–industry knowledge exchange process.

Practical implications

This paper implies that gender, age and area of specialization did not have significant power to moderate the relationship between academic contribution and university–industry knowledge exchange process.

Originality/value

There is a lack of research literature discussing the moderating effect of demographic factors on the university–industry knowledge exchange process. In Sri Lanka, money and commercial benefits that received through industry partnerships had not been valued by academics. The majority considered the connection with industry and exchange knowledge as a responsibility that they should perform in return to free education received from grade one to graduation.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 25 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

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Article
Publication date: 23 October 2020

Moheeb Abualqumboz, Paul W. Chan, David Bamford and Iain Reid

This study aims to examine reciprocal exchanges in knowledge networks using temporal differentiation of knowledge exchanges. To date, research on horizontal knowledge

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine reciprocal exchanges in knowledge networks using temporal differentiation of knowledge exchanges. To date, research on horizontal knowledge networks rather overlooks the temporal perspective, which could explain the dynamics of exchange in those networks.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper reports on a study of four horizontal knowledge networks in the UK over a period of 18 months.

Findings

The findings integrate three temporal dimensions of timescale, timeliness and time modalities. The dimensions have implications for the way knowledge is exchanged (or not), which can in turn sustain or stymie productive knowledge exchange in horizontal knowledge networks.

Research limitations/implications

The study encourages researchers to attend to the micro-processes of knowledge exchanges through the integrative framework of temporalities. While this study examined horizontal networks, future research can be extended to analysing temporalities in other types of networks.

Practical implications

It seeks to inspire practitioners to appreciate how the impacts of knowledge networks play out in/over time, and how more effective coopetitive knowledge-sharing environments can be created and sustained by taking differentiated time structures into account.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the knowledge management literature by providing a temporal perspective to understand reciprocal knowledge exchanges in horizontal knowledge networks.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 25 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

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Article
Publication date: 18 May 2015

Fernando G. Alberti and Emanuele Pizzurno

This paper aims at investigating the multifaceted nature of innovation networks by focusing on two research questions: Do cluster actors exchange only one type of…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims at investigating the multifaceted nature of innovation networks by focusing on two research questions: Do cluster actors exchange only one type of innovation-related knowledge? Do cluster actors play different roles in innovation-related knowledge exchange?

Design/methodology/approach

This paper builds on data collected at the firm level in an Italian aerospace cluster, that is a technology-intensive industry where innovation is at the base of local competitiveness. A questionnaire was used to collect both attribute data and relational data concerning collaboration and the flows of knowledge in innovation networks. The authors distinguished among three types of knowledge (technological, managerial and market knowledge) and five types of brokerage roles (coordinator, gatekeeper, liaison, representative and consultant). Data analysis relied on social network analysis techniques and software.

Findings

Concerning the first research question, the findings show that different types of knowledge flow in different ways in innovation networks. The different types of knowledge are unevenly exchanged. The exchange of technological knowledge is open to everyone in the cluster. The exchange of market and managerial knowledge is selective. Concerning the second research question, the authors suggest that different types of cluster actors (large firms, small- and medium-sized enterprises, research centers and universities and institutions for collaboration) do play different roles in innovation networks, especially with reference to the three types of knowledge considered in this study.

Research limitations/implications

The present paper has some limitations. First of all, the analysis focuses on just one cluster (one industry in one specific location), cross- and comparative analyses with other clusters may illuminate the findings better, eliminating industry and geographical biases. Second, the paper focuses only on innovation-related knowledge exchanges within the cluster and not across it.

Practical implications

The results have practical implications both for policy makers and for managers. First, this research stresses how innovation often originates from a combination of different knowledge types acquired through the collaboration with heterogeneous cluster actors. Further, the analysis of brokerage roles in innovation-driven collaborations may help policy makers in designing programs for knowledge-transfer partnerships among the various actors of a cluster.

Social implications

The paper suggests a clear need of developing professional figures capable of operating at the interface of different knowledge domains.

Originality/value

The data illuminate several aspects of how innovation takes place in a cluster opening up intriguing aspects that have been overlooked by extant literature. The authors believe that this may trigger several lines of further research on the topic.

Details

Competitiveness Review, vol. 25 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1059-5422

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Article
Publication date: 13 May 2019

Sanjay Kumar Singh, Shashank Mittal, Atri Sengupta and Rabindra Kumar Pradhan

This study aims to examine a dual-pathway model that recognizes two distinct (formal and informal) but complementary mechanisms of knowledge exchangesknowledge sharing…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine a dual-pathway model that recognizes two distinct (formal and informal) but complementary mechanisms of knowledge exchangesknowledge sharing and knowledge helping. It also investigates how team members use their limited human and psychosocial capital for prosocial knowledge effectiveness.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey-based approach was used to examine the hypotheses of the study. A moderated-mediation model was proposed and tested using bootstrap approach.

Findings

Knowledge sharing and knowledge helping were found to be the significant links through which human capital (capability) and psychosocial capital (motivation and efficacy) significantly predict prosocial knowledge effectiveness. Post hoc analysis suggests that human capital through knowledge sharing influences team learning, whereas the psychosocial capital through knowledge helping influences team leadership.

Originality/value

The present study found two distinct but complementary and yet necessary mechanisms of knowledge exchanges to be linked as the important outlay for the human and psychosocial capital to be effective in the prosocial knowledge behaviours.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 23 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

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Article
Publication date: 7 April 2014

Leif Jarle Gressgård

For knowledge exchange systems to yield best organizational benefits, it is acknowledged that employees have to both contribute with and apply system content. This may be

Abstract

Purpose

For knowledge exchange systems to yield best organizational benefits, it is acknowledged that employees have to both contribute with and apply system content. This may be of particular importance in distributed environments due to limitations in alternative channels for knowledge exchange. This study investigates the effects of the gap between contribution and application on the degree of knowledge exchange within and between organizational borders and work locations.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is based on survey data involving 2204 respondents from a large petroleum operator company and eight of its main contractors.

Findings

An increase in the gap between contribution and application is accompanied with reduced levels of knowledge exchange between organizational borders and work locations, but has no effects on knowledge exchange between employees of the same organization working at the same location. This is explained by the availability of substitute channels for local knowledge exchange.

Practical implications

Knowledge exchange systems research and practice have to focus on both knowledge contribution and knowledge application as fundamental processes, and should further consider organizational structure as an important factor.

Originality/value

Most research on contribution and application of content in knowledge exchange systems focuses on knowledge exchange within company boundaries. This study systematically investigates the effects of the gap between contribution and application of system content at different levels of organizational distribution, and thus extends existing research by introducing organizational distribution as a conditioning variable for successful knowledge management.

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Article
Publication date: 17 August 2015

Jeremy Galbreath

This paper aims to explore the nature of the cooperation–competition nexus in regional clusters by examining how wine firms in Australia engage in knowledge exchanges

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the nature of the cooperation–competition nexus in regional clusters by examining how wine firms in Australia engage in knowledge exchanges about a “common” strategic issue: climate change. Further, it determines if differences in climate change innovations exist based on sub-regional position.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a survey, data were collected from 557 firms across three wine-producing regions in Australia. Respondents were drawn from a leading wine industry database.

Findings

The findings suggest that, after accounting for all knowledge exchanges, firms across the regions appear to be generally engaging in knowledge exchanges about climate change within their own geographic sub-regions. However, paradoxically, firms in “elite” sub-regions appear to be demonstrating more of a cooperative posture via a greater level of external knowledge exchanges. The results also suggest that implementation rates differ for adaptive climate change innovations only (as opposed to mitigative innovations) to the apparent advantage of firms in elite sub-regions.

Research limitations/implications

The study represents Australian wine regions and should not be taken as a general population sample. The impacts of climate change in other wine-producing regions around the world may vary, leading to different results than those found in this study.

Practical implications

Wine producers face many challenges with respect to climate change. To respond effectively to this issue, the sharing of knowledge is important to innovate around mitigative and adaptive practices. This research suggests that greater stimulation of open knowledge exchanges is likely needed so that all producers can benefit from industry-wide learning.

Originality/value

This paper provides insights to wine scholars, industry practitioners and peak industry bodies seeking to understand and enhance the wine industry’s response to climate change. The paper also points to areas of future research opportunity and provides policy recommendations.

Details

International Journal of Wine Business Research, vol. 27 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1062

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Article
Publication date: 7 August 2018

Muhammad Kashif Imran, Syed Muhammad Javed Iqbal, Usman Aslam and Tehreem Fatima

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the benefits of social media to enhance knowledge exchange in the organizations. Moreover, the current qualitative inquiry…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the benefits of social media to enhance knowledge exchange in the organizations. Moreover, the current qualitative inquiry elaborates the orientation of doctors about social media applications and knowledge exchange in the workplace.

Design/methodology/approach

The constructionism approach based on grounded theory followed by qualitative design is used to investigate the exposition with the help of 22 non-directive and semi-structured interviews from the doctors of Bahawal Victoria Hospital. The cases are selected by using convenience sampling and thematic analysis is done using NVivo-11 plus.

Findings

The results end up with four major themes. The social media applications, at the first door, extend communication and relationship among employees. Moreover, these applications are equally beneficial for acquiring existing and new knowledge. Additionally, social media applications advance knowledge exchange by promoting knowledge sharing and transfer.

Research limitations/implications

This study is equally beneficial for employees and management to promote knowledge exchange through social media applications. The effective and efficient use of social media applications helps organizations to boost knowledge strength among employees and can address various critical issues.

Originality/value

This is an attempt to sightsee the unattended dimension (i.e. knowledge exchange) in the context with social media. The social media applications are popular all over the world and pace of their usage is increasing day by day but their real contribution toward organizational well-being is still lacking in contemporary literature.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 57 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

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