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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2003

Nattavud Pimpa

International students are key protagonists in the Australian educational system. Although much research has been conducted to better understand various aspects related to…

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Abstract

International students are key protagonists in the Australian educational system. Although much research has been conducted to better understand various aspects related to factors affecting their choices of international education, surprisingly little attention has been paid to the influence of personal sources. This study employs both qualitative and quantitative approaches to clarify this research problem. The qualitative phase identifies the influence from the Thai family into five categories: finance, information, expectation, persuasion, and competition. The quantitative phase examines the influence of five factors on five choices of international education. The study concludes with a discussion of the implications of the findings for the marketing of international education to Thailand.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 17 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 January 2022

Rima M. Bizri

What makes family influence so influential in the family firm? Time and again, research studies point to family influence as a factor that significantly impacts…

Abstract

Purpose

What makes family influence so influential in the family firm? Time and again, research studies point to family influence as a factor that significantly impacts decision-making in the family business, thus highlighting the need to investigate the variables which cause family influence to be so powerful. The purpose of this study is to explore the construct of family influence in the family firm, under an integrative lens that combines insights from Institutional Theory and the Resource-Based View.

Design/methodology/approach

The quantitative approach was used using a 35-item survey measuring 6 constructs, where data collection yielded a total of 206 completed surveys included in the data analysis. Data were analyzed using SmartPLS (3.0) and results were appropriately reported.

Findings

The findings of this study propose that the two theoretical perspectives can be useful in explaining how various factors are able to intensify family influence on strategic family firm decisions like internationalization. Specifically, the lack of resources, government support, managerial knowledge and capability in foreign markets represent serious barriers that render the family firm more reliant on and subjected to family influence. Similarly, informal institutions like the fear of failure in foreign markets and uncertainty avoidance often make the family firm more dependent on, and accepting of, family influence.

Originality/value

The path analysis undertaken in this study has empirically depicted how resource-related and institution-based forces can together augment the effects of “family influence,” making it a more powerful and prohibitive factor in the internationalization decision, thus offering an insightful interpretation of these results and valuable practical and theoretical implications.

Details

Journal of Family Business Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2043-6238

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 January 2013

Gurvinder S. Shergill, Harjit Sekhon and Min Zhao

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the cultural assimilation influence on family purchase decision making of Chinese immigrant families in New Zealand, and in…

2326

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the cultural assimilation influence on family purchase decision making of Chinese immigrant families in New Zealand, and in Chinese families living in China.

Design/methodology/approach

The data were collected from 200 respondents. In total, 100 families have been chosen from each of these countries. The data were collected by the snowball sampling method across 11 different products and four decision-making stages.

Findings

The results of this research show that cultural assimilation does have an influence on parental perceptions of teen's influence on family decision making. Chinese immigrants' teenage children in New Zealand were perceived as having more influence within the family than their peers in Chinese families living in China.

Research limitations/implications

The research used a sample size of only 100 respondents from each country. Furthermore, it used snowball sampling and mid-income group families only.

Practical implications

These findings help marketers to gain a better understanding of the influence of cultural assimilation, and use specific marketing communication and promotion strategies.

Originality/value

The paper empirically demonstrates that Chinese parents living in China and Chinese immigrant parents living in New Zealand perceive their children's involvement in family purchase decision differently. Chinese immigrant parents perceive that their children are becoming assimilated with New Zealand culture. This is the first ever study done on Chinese Immigrant families living in New Zealand and Chinese families living in China by collecting and using the cross-culture data from New Zealand and China.

Article
Publication date: 1 August 1998

Christina Kwai Choi Lee and Roger Marshall

Many consumer behaviour researchers have concluded that using self reports in the measurement of influence in family decision making may provide data which is not…

3622

Abstract

Many consumer behaviour researchers have concluded that using self reports in the measurement of influence in family decision making may provide data which is not reflective of actual influence among family members. This suggests the need for different methods of obtaining influence data. This paper reports the development and preliminary application of an observed influence scale; a scale developed to measure actual influence using content analysis of videotaped family interactions. This observational method determines the relative influence of family members over three stages of the decision making process. The scale is tested on nuclear families with two adolescents, 89 from New Zealand and 24 from Singapore. The analysis indicates the scale has strong predictive and face validity.

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 June 2012

Monica Chaudhary and Aayushi Gupta

The purpose of this paper is twofold: to categorize and rank products based on children's influence and to compare their influence on the different stages of the family

2344

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is twofold: to categorize and rank products based on children's influence and to compare their influence on the different stages of the family buying process.

Design/methodology/approach

The study was based on an extensive literature review and focus group discussions. Using a structured questionnaire, a survey was conducted with children aged 8‐12 years. The sample size was 175.

Findings

Factor analysis revealed three distinct product clusters: “loud”, “noisy” and “quiet” goods. Children's influence was found to be highest for noisy goods, lesser for loud goods and lowest for quiet goods. One‐way MANOVA analysis found that for loud and noisy goods children's influence was highest in the initiation stage, and lowest in the search stage. For quiet goods, the highest influence was in the final decision stage followed by initiation and choice stage.

Practical implications

The identified product clusters and children's relative influence across the buying stages for these clusters are expected to enhance marketer's understanding of children's role in family decision making. Marketers should take these observations into consideration while designing and implementing their marketing strategies.

Originality/value

The results are important because previous studies have dealt with children's influence for various products at a broad level. In this paper, an innovative segmentation for products based on children's influence level has been identified and the influence measured across these clusters.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 31 May 2013

Martin R.W. Hiebl, Birgit Feldbauer‐Durstmüller and Christine Duller

The purpose of the present paper is to investigate whether the transition from a family business to a non‐family business affects the institutionalisation of management accounting.

3555

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the present paper is to investigate whether the transition from a family business to a non‐family business affects the institutionalisation of management accounting.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is based on an online survey among all large and medium‐sized Austrian firms. Univariate and multivariate statistical analyses were used to test the impact of the level of family influence on aspects of the institutionalisation of management accounting. Firm size is included as the main control variable.

Findings

A lower level of influence from the controlling family was found to be correlated with the institutionalisation and intensification of management accounting in medium‐sized firms. For large firms, such a linear relationship could not be drawn. The level of education of management accountants was inversely correlated with the level of family influence in both large and medium‐sized firms.

Research limitations/implications

Further research into the reasons, underlying drivers and inter‐organisational promoters of management accounting change in family businesses is needed. Furthermore, the organisational impacts of the transition from family businesses to non‐family businesses deserve further investigation.

Originality/value

A framework for assessing the organisational effects of the transition from family businesses to non‐family businesses is provided. The empirical results on the impact of the transition on the institutionalisation of management accounting are presented. The level of family influence was found to act as a significant contextual factor for the organisation of management accounting in medium‐sized firms.

Details

Journal of Accounting & Organizational Change, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1832-5912

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 August 2021

Maria Rita Blanco and Mariela N. Golik

The career is a space where family and work lives amalgamate. The role of work for the individual, and the meaning of work within the culture, will determine the relevance…

Abstract

Purpose

The career is a space where family and work lives amalgamate. The role of work for the individual, and the meaning of work within the culture, will determine the relevance of family. This study investigates CEOs' perception about conjugal family influence on career decisions, and it examines family factors.

Design/methodology/approach

Through a qualitative study, 22 Latin American CEOs who work for multinational firms were interviewed in a semi-structured way.

Findings

Not all career decisions were influenced by conjugal family. CEOs varied in the extent to which they considered their families when reflecting on their career decisions. Expatriation, joining or quitting an organization and change of area of work were found as those decisions perceived to be influenced by conjugal family. Family support, family structure and family demands and responsibilities were identified as the family factors involved. In spite of the role salience, family factors influenced some of CEOs' career decisions, in part, due to the cultural characteristics of the Latin American environment. The instrumental support of the extended family, as part of collectivist societies, was also evidenced.

Practical implications

A better understanding of the family influenced decisions and family factors involved may enhance individual career decision-making as well as organizational career management processes and public initiatives.

Originality/value

This study contributes to family and career literature, being the first one to explore the conjugal family influence upon CEOs' career decisions.

Details

International Journal of Emerging Markets, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-8809

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 31 December 2020

Catarina Afonso Alves, Ana Paula Matias Gama and Mário Augusto

This study examines how stewardship might mediate the influence of family ownership on firm financial performance. The authors argue that differences in financial…

Abstract

Purpose

This study examines how stewardship might mediate the influence of family ownership on firm financial performance. The authors argue that differences in financial performance may reflect not only the family's influence but also the prevalence of a stewardship-oriented culture, across varying degrees of family influence.

Design/methodology/approach

The measure of family influence uses the F-PEC scale: family [F], power [P], experience [E] and culture [C]. It supports cross-firm comparisons of different levels of family influence. To capture the multidimensional nature of family influence, this study uses structural equation modelling and measures the meditating effects of stewardship.

Findings

The results reveal a mediating effect of stewardship; family firms achieve better performance when they take advantage of and encourage stewardship attitudes among owners and leaders. Factors associated with stewardship behaviour, including stewardship motivation and stewardship culture, help explain why some family firms perform better than others.

Practical implications

When analysing the behaviour of family firms, interested entrepreneurs, managers and consultants should acknowledge that the family's influence entails both financial and emotional capital. The survival of the family businesses depends on balancing these aspects.

Originality/value

In response to calls for research into mediators of the complex relationship between family influence and firm outcomes, this study provides a novel explanation for performance-maximizing behaviours by organizations, in which pro-organizational attitudes coexist with self-serving motives.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 28 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 December 2020

Suhail Mohammad Ghouse, Monica Chaudhary and Omar Durrah

This paper aims to identify the perception levels of the child and parents towards the child’s influence on different product categories and stages of the family buying…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to identify the perception levels of the child and parents towards the child’s influence on different product categories and stages of the family buying process in an Arab country Oman.

Design/methodology/approach

On the basis of the research gap identified from the literature, two separate bilingual questionnaires (parent and child) in English and local language (Arabic) were developed. The research commenced with a pilot study on 10 school students followed by contact with school authorities requesting to conduct a survey on school students 8–12 years of age and data collection through the survey on the students and their parents (either father/mother) during September-November, 2017–2018. Data analysis was made through an independent sample t-test and confirmatory factor analysis was made using AMOS 24.

Findings

A model was proposed incorporating three product categories as noisy, quiet and loud goods and perceptions of Arab parents and children were examined for the three stages of the family buying process. The findings of the study reveal that significant differences exist in child-parental perceptions on the child’s influence in the search, evaluation and final buying stages. The mean score among the three product categories was highest for noisy goods (Mean = 3.21, SD = 0.817) while in the case of buying stages, the mean of the final buying stage was highest (Mean = 2.11, SD = 0.514).

Research limitations/implications

More research studies are required in the Arab context, especially bringing in the social status of parents to justify their different shopping behaviours. This analysis is based on the perceptions of the tweenager segment, adding perceptions of the teenage segment could generate better research implications.

Practical implications

The research will serve as a base to consumer marketers in understanding distinct features of Arab tweenagers towards different products and will aid them in designing appropriate marketing strategies targeting parents and children in the Arab region.

Originality/value

After an extensive review of the consumer literature, it is assumed that almost no research study has been made examining parent-child perceptions towards the different product categories and buying stages targeting traditionally oriented families in the Arab region.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 13 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 17 August 2018

Navneet Bhatnagar, Kavil Ramachandran and Sougata Ray

New venture (NV) creation is critical to the growth and long-term survival of business groups. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the NV creation process in family

Abstract

Purpose

New venture (NV) creation is critical to the growth and long-term survival of business groups. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the NV creation process in family business (FB) context and examine the influence of familial socio-political considerations and dynamics on venture creation processes.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper employs a triangulation technique drawing from the extant literature, observations from 25 in-depth interviews of FB leaders and insights from two FB practitioners and abductive reasoning to theorize on the NV creation process and the influence of socio-political considerations and dynamics within family.

Findings

The results show that there are four distinct stages of the NV creation process in FB context. Familial socio-political considerations and dynamics greatly influence the NV creation process. These considerations and dynamics vary according to the socio-political clout enjoyed by the proposer. Leadership’s predisposition to the proposer and the proposer’s socio-political clout in the family determine whether an NV proposal leads to venture creation.

Research limitations/implications

The study extends NV creation literature by suggesting that in addition to the economic rationale, socio-political considerations play a critical role in venture creation decisions. Future research can validate the findings with quantitative analysis.

Practical implications

FB members must garner strong socio-political support for their NV proposal. FB leaders must ensure that their NV proposal evaluation and resource allocation decisions are not unduly influenced by the proposer’s socio-political clout.

Originality/value

The study views the NV creation process in FB context from the lens of familial forces at play. It identifies four distinct stages of the NV creation process and examines the role played by familial socio-political considerations and dynamics during each stage.

Details

Cross Cultural & Strategic Management, vol. 25 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-5794

Keywords

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