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Article
Publication date: 24 January 2023

Maria-Luisa Hernandez-Olalla, Carmen Valor and Carmen Abril

Past work on the role of brands in the acceptance of organic products is partial and inconclusive. Research has failed to examine the consumer sense-making process…

Abstract

Purpose

Past work on the role of brands in the acceptance of organic products is partial and inconclusive. Research has failed to examine the consumer sense-making process underpinning fit assessment, despite the centrality of this assessment in the acceptance of line extensions. This study reconceptualizes the fit construct, showing the relationship of the fit dimensions (noncompensatory) and contributes to the literature with a deeper understanding of the role of a brand's association in the assessment process, which has been poorly examined in the past.

Design/methodology/approach

Grounded theory was used to unearth the process followed by consumers to assess the fit of organic line extensions. The study was based on 14 in-depth interviews.

Findings

The findings show that the dimensions of fit that consumers consider in assessing organic line extensions depend on the schema used in the assessment process. Moreover, it demonstrates that these dimensions have disparate structural relationships with one another, depending on consumers' previous commitment to organic products. Finally, the paper identifies three possible behavioral reactions by consumers toward organic line extensions.

Research limitations/implications

The main limitation of this research concerns the settings in which it was developed. Therefore, and as stated by Strauss and Corbin (1990) the model applies to the situation analyzed and not to others. Future research could study if there are cultural differences in the assessment process of an organic line extension. Moreover, the contribution presented in this paper needs further empirical testing; specifically, the configuration of dimensions needed to accept an organic line extension and the relationship among dimensions.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the literature by studying the impact of brand association on assessing an organic line extension and reconceptualizing the fit construct by showing the dimensions and the relationship between them that are not additive to the overall fit, as shown in past literature. Additionally, it provides a guide to brands wishing to launch an organic product using a line extension strategy and the potential implications for the parent brand that should be considered.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 December 2022

Miyuri Shirai

Research on vertical line extensions shows that consumers tend to evaluate upward extensions higher than downward ones. This paper examines the opposite situation. It also…

Abstract

Purpose

Research on vertical line extensions shows that consumers tend to evaluate upward extensions higher than downward ones. This paper examines the opposite situation. It also investigates the process underlying consumer responses by identifying a moderator and mediators.

Design/methodology/approach

Two studies were conducted to assess the effect of extension direction (upward vs downward) on consumers' extension evaluations. Study 1 incorporated implicit theories of relationships (the growth belief) as a moderator and inferred motives for launching a vertical line extension as mediators in the effect. Study 2 presented a firm's rationale for undertaking the extension to examine whether it influenced evaluations.

Findings

Consumers' preferences for downward over upward extensions appeared in markets where the exclusivity of luxury brands had been reduced. However, the resistance to upward extensions was weaker when consumers endorsed stronger growth beliefs in human relationships. Consumers inferred customer- and selling-oriented motives more strongly from downward than upward extensions, enhancing the evaluations. Finally, when presenting a rationale for launching an extension in the launch announcement, customer-oriented reasoning raised the evaluations higher than selling-oriented reasoning but did not elevate the evaluations higher than the announcement showing no reason.

Originality/value

This study advances the literature on vertical line extensions and shows that consumers' preference for upward over downward extensions is not universal. The opposite pattern exists in markets with a lower distinction between high- and low-end brands. It supports the theoretical notion that responses are driven by the differences in growth belief and in cognitive inferences vis-à-vis motives.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 July 1991

Byron M. Sharp

Brand extension, the use of an existing brand name on a newproduct, is an exceedingly popular marketing tactic as companies attemptto economise on new product launches and…

1889

Abstract

Brand extension, the use of an existing brand name on a new product, is an exceedingly popular marketing tactic as companies attempt to economise on new product launches and managers attempt to improve short run sales results. Review and analysis of current marketing research concludes that popular claims for general benefits of the practice are contradicted both by marketplace evidence and logical argument. Directions of future research to determine whether any specific conditions exist where brand extension might be an appropriate brand management tactic are outlined.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 9 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 July 2000

Arthur Cheng‐Hsui Chen and Shaw K. Chen

Examines the negative impacts of brand extension failure upon the original brand by calibrating the difference of brand equity. Using data collected from college students…

7694

Abstract

Examines the negative impacts of brand extension failure upon the original brand by calibrating the difference of brand equity. Using data collected from college students in Taiwan, establishes four hypotheses to identify various effects of a failed brand extension in diluting the original brand’s equity. Analyzes the different effects among four types of equity‐source brands for both close and distant extensions. Equity‐source and equity level of the original brand is identified first. All components of brand equity‐source are then used to evaluate the performance of a brand extension. Finds that an unsuccessful brand extension dilutes the original brand for all three high equity‐source brands. Effects of brand dilution differ according to the type of equity source possessed by the original brand, but there is no difference in brand dilution effects from close and distant extension failures.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1993

Byron M. Sharp

Examines the inherent risks of brand extension alongside empiricalevidence of the success rates of brand extensions compared withbrand‐name product launches. Concludes…

3779

Abstract

Examines the inherent risks of brand extension alongside empirical evidence of the success rates of brand extensions compared with brand‐name product launches. Concludes that the brand extension is justifiable only when it can be clearly shown to enhance the success of a new product launch and existing brand equity. Puts forward a number of rules for the appropriate use of brand extension.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 1998

Mark S. Glynn and Roderick J. Brodie

This paper reports a replication of Broniarczyk and Alba’s study of the influence of brand‐specific associations on brand extensions. The results broadly support the…

5378

Abstract

This paper reports a replication of Broniarczyk and Alba’s study of the influence of brand‐specific associations on brand extensions. The results broadly support the original study showing brand‐specific associations ( i.e. attributes which differentiate a brand from the competition)can dominate the effects of the parent brand to the point where they reverse extension evaluations. Thus the study provides further evidence to challenge the commonly held assumption that the effect associated with the original brand name and product category is automatically transferred to the brand extension.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 7 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 September 2015

Rachid Halfaoui and Bachir Chemani

The purpose of this paper is to conduct a series of tests designed to highlight changes in the physical characteristics of the yarn resulting from mechanical efforts…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to conduct a series of tests designed to highlight changes in the physical characteristics of the yarn resulting from mechanical efforts comparable to that to which they are subjected on the weaving machine. Among the physical properties of the warp yarn, the authors examined changes include: the residual deformation, strength, elongation and elasticity, on the extender repetition effort overtension growing steadily, leading, after some time, to break. Therefore, the yarn treated extender repetition is subject to a more severe test than the actual weaving on the loom.

Design/methodology/approach

The initial length of the specimen under constant static load of 20 g, was 50 cm in all tests. The yarns are stored on several coils, the authors collected a quantity of thread on each of them, according to the law of chance, to avoid errors due to long periods of irregularity and the authors estimated that the extensions can be supported by the wire without danger of rupture are interesting practical point of view. Three rate extensions were chosen for the two yarns: 0.5, 1.2 and 1.9 percent. The maximum number of tractions was calculated for each wire by multiplying the maximum thread count practice by the average distance between the warp beam and the weft yarn on the weaving machine.

Findings

The fall of the resistance and elongation resulting from repeated extensions which yarn are subjected on the extensometer, corresponds almost exactly to the residual deformation recorded. Increasing the rate of extensions causes relatively large decrease in strength and elongation. The authors also notice that the strength and elongation at break tends to decrease when the number of extensions decreases. The fall of the resistance and the elongation at break is more important for carded yarns then combed yarns increases or when the frequency decreases.

Originality/value

The maximum difference of the resistance is 32 g, 10.3 percent in the case of carded yarns, while in the case of the combed yarns; the same difference is 25 g, or 6.4 percent of the initial strength. Similarly, the maximum fall of the elongation at break for carded yarns is about 2 or 16.1 percent of the initial elongation, while the corresponding drop in the case of the combed yarns is 1.8 or 10.9 percent of the initial elongation. The corresponding values found during the testing wool combed yarns, were, respectively about 4.8 and 6.6 percent.

Details

International Journal of Clothing Science and Technology, vol. 27 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-6222

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 4 December 2018

Bekir Bora Dedeoğlu

This chapter sheds light on the ‘country of origin’ concept. The author contends that this concept is composed of micro- and macro-components. He argues that the tourists…

Abstract

This chapter sheds light on the ‘country of origin’ concept. The author contends that this concept is composed of micro- and macro-components. He argues that the tourists’ hedonic and monetary gratifications are derived from the travel experiences. Therefore, the country-of-origin image (COI) can have an impact on the destination’s brand extension. In this light, this contribution examines the relationship among COI, overall brand equity and brand extension. The author implies that the hedonic and monetary values can have a moderating effect on the impact of COI and on destination brand extension.

Details

The Branding of Tourist Destinations: Theoretical and Empirical Insights
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-373-9

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 September 2022

Marek Szelągowski, Piotr Biernacki, Justyna Berniak-Woźny and Cezary Radosław Lipinski

The aim of the article is to propose BPMN extensions that facilitate the modeling of Clinical Pathways in a way that enables for various groups of users, the transfer of a…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of the article is to propose BPMN extensions that facilitate the modeling of Clinical Pathways in a way that enables for various groups of users, the transfer of a much wider range of information in the form of process models without compromising their readability and usefulness.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses the design science research methodology (DSRM) and covers phases of a design-oriented research project extending BPMN notation for clinical pathway modeling.

Findings

The article proposes extensions of BPMN in 5 areas, enabling standardization of the description of business processes of different natures and complexity and in turn meeting the needs and requirements of modeling clinical pathways and, more broadly speaking, knowledge-intensive business processes (kiBPs) in general. As shown by the evaluation carried out among medical personnel, the proposed extensions allow for the readable transfer of a considerably larger body of information relevant to the planned, conducted and assessed therapy (kiBPs) than the current BPMN 2.0 standard.

Originality/value

The BPMN extensions proposed in the article fill the gaps in this notation and do not require users to know many notations, which in practice is unrealistic. Defined extensions to the BPMN specification makes it possible to standardise the description of processes of different natures and levels of complexity. In this way, both simplified models (and views of models) dedicated to users unfamiliar with BPMN and models (or views) using advanced possibilities provided by BPMN can be based on one standard, even if they use only a small part of its possibilities.

Book part
Publication date: 17 February 2015

Noelle Chesley and Britta E. Johnson

To assess: (1) the prevalence of specific work practices that incorporate use of information and communication technology (ICT), (2) whether these practices are connected…

Abstract

Purpose

To assess: (1) the prevalence of specific work practices that incorporate use of information and communication technology (ICT), (2) whether these practices are connected to employee distress or productivity via work extension or social network processes; (3) the implications of ICT-based work practices for the work/family interface.

Design/methodology/approach

We draw on the 2008 Pew Networked Workers data collected from a nationally representative sample of workers and use logistic regression methods to investigate links among use of specific ICT-based practices and increases in distress or productivity.

Findings

(1) Use of e-mail, instant messaging, texts, and social networking sites at work varies by demographic, organization, and job characteristics, and (2) ICT-based work extension, social network expansion, and connectivity to work colleagues are linked to increases in distress and productivity. Connecting with family or friends while at work can reduce the likelihood that an employee reports an increase in work stress.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations include a cross-sectional design, age of the data, missing data, and measurement issues. Even with these limitations, there are few investigations drawing from national samples of employees that can assess work-related ICT use with this level of depth.

Originality/value

Findings point to technological innovation as an important factor influencing work extension and social network processes and connect this to changes in employee distress and productivity. The focus on productivity is especially important given the emphasis that previous research has placed on linking ICT use and employee distress.

Details

Work and Family in the New Economy
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-630-0

Keywords

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