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Article
Publication date: 23 June 2021

Kjersti Kjos Longva

The purpose of the paper is to provide insight into how students navigate entrepreneurial ecosystems and make use of social networks as they create their own ventures…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the paper is to provide insight into how students navigate entrepreneurial ecosystems and make use of social networks as they create their own ventures. Such ecosystems for students are an understudied phenomenon and there is a need for more profound insights into the issue in order to build better support systems for student entrepreneurs. The study aims to increase understanding on the elements that are important in students' entrepreneurial ecosystems and how these impact on students' venture creation processes, with emphasize on the role social networks play. Student entrepreneurs account for a substantial number of the startups that come into being at universities. Understanding more about how the surroundings affects this process is important for facilitating student entrepreneurship in higher education.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is qualitative and makes use of in-depth interviews with student entrepreneurs, educators and support actors in the ecosystems. Multiple actors were interviewed in order to capture different perspectives on the matter, with a total of 15 interviews conducted.

Findings

Two main findings arose from the study. First, it provides insight into elements that are perceived as important for student venture creation by the student entrepreneurs themselves, by educators and by support actors in the ecosystems. Second, it describes how the elements make up the entrepreneurial ecosystems surrounding the students, which serve as platforms from which students can develop their social networks. Therefore, the study highlights how such ecosystems can serve as sources from which students can gain access to ideas, resources and identity processes.

Research limitations/implications

A limitation of the study is that the interviews took place in one country. Consequently, further investigation is necessary to establish whether the findings are valid in other contexts. The research has implications for higher educational institutions, policymakers and researchers concerned with student entrepreneurship and student venture creation.

Originality/value

The study contributes empirical findings on a topic that is currently not well understood and on which there are few empirical studies. While student ventures represent a substantial proportion of university spin-offs, the topic has received little attention compared to research on academic entrepreneurship. The study represents a step towards enhancing understanding of students' entrepreneurial ecosystems and how students gain access to resources through social network ties within these systems.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 27 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

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Book part
Publication date: 11 July 2014

Candida G. Brush

This chapter explores the concept of an entrepreneurship education ecosystem. The concept of ecosystem comes from the natural sciences, but is increasingly applied to…

Abstract

This chapter explores the concept of an entrepreneurship education ecosystem. The concept of ecosystem comes from the natural sciences, but is increasingly applied to regional development, or clusters, which focus on firm inter-organizational relationships. Building on the idea of the university is a key player in a local entrepreneurship ecosystem, this chapter provides a framework for examining a school’s role in this process. A typology is presented that articulates roles that schools may pursue in developing their own internal entrepreneurship education ecosystem.

Details

Innovative Pathways for University Entrepreneurship in the 21st Century
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-497-8

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Book part
Publication date: 30 October 2020

Vanessa Ratten

Entrepreneurial opportunities can be created through the process of coopetition in which entities in an ecosystem collaborate and compete. Increasingly more emphasis is…

Abstract

Entrepreneurial opportunities can be created through the process of coopetition in which entities in an ecosystem collaborate and compete. Increasingly more emphasis is being placed on how to capitalize on the role sport plays in society through an entrepreneurial ecosystem perspective. This chapter focuses on how entrepreneurship in society has developed and the role sport plays based on complex adaptive systems. An explanation of the ecosystems metaphor emphasizes how the sport industry is similar to a biological system in which planned and unplanned occurrences contribute to entrepreneurship. This enables a theoretical and practical underpinning of sport startups to emerge.

Details

Sport Startups: New Advances in Entrepreneurship
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-082-1

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Article
Publication date: 9 December 2020

Maribel Guerrero, Carlos A. Santamaría-Velasco and Raj Mahto

The authors propose a theoretical basis for understanding the role of ecosystem intermediaries in the configuration of social entrepreneurship identities in social purpose…

Abstract

Purpose

The authors propose a theoretical basis for understanding the role of ecosystem intermediaries in the configuration of social entrepreneurship identities in social purpose organisations (SPOs) and their business model innovations (BMIs).

Design/methodology/approach

Adopting a retrospective multiple-case study, the authors offer insights into the paths/elements that determine the building of 44 social entrepreneurship identities in the context of an emerging economy (Mexico).

Findings

The study sheds light on the role of intermediaries in the configuration of the entrepreneurial identities of Mexican SPOs and BMIs, as well as several externalities generated during the process of capturing the social and economic value, especially when social innovations are focussed on solving societal, economic and ecological social problems.

Research limitations/implications

The first limitation is related to the analysis of intermediaries within the social entrepreneurship ecosystem, which needs more conceptual and empirical evidence. The second limitation is that the analysis focussed only on intervened SPOs, as the authors did not control for non-intervened SPOs. Thus, this allows for future in-depth analysis of intermediary efficiency in a focus group (intervened SPOs) and a control group (non-intervened SPOs).

Practical implications

The study also provides insights for Mexican SPOs on how a social entrepreneurship identity helps to capture the value creation of social innovations within an innovation ecosystem. Indeed, it is strongly aligned with the United Nations' Social Development Goals.

Originality/value

The study enhances the discussion about how intermediaries could encourage social entrepreneurial identity, as well as how intermediary intervention could facilitate the design and implementation of BMIs in the innovation ecosystem.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 27 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

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Article
Publication date: 3 July 2020

Nahla G.A. Arabi and Abdelgadir M.A. Abdalla

The components of the ecosystems differ from one ecosystem to another. The purpose of this paper is to identify the components of entrepreneurial ecosystem and investigate…

Abstract

Purpose

The components of the ecosystems differ from one ecosystem to another. The purpose of this paper is to identify the components of entrepreneurial ecosystem and investigate its role in entrepreneurship development in the Sudanese manufacturing sector.

Design/methodology/approach

The current study is explanatory in nature and designed to be cross-sectional, using a quantitative approach. Questionnaires were used to collect data from a stratified sample, ten industrial subsectors drawn from the total population of the study. It includes 106 manufacturing firms, all located in Khartoum State. Data are analyzed with help of exploratory factor analysis and multiple regression model. .

Findings

Among the major findings is that the relationship between the entrepreneurial ecosystem and entrepreneurship development was found to be significant in six factors, namely: finance, government policy, human capital, infrastructure, research and development and innovation and regulatory framework, whereas it was insignificant in three factors, namely; culture, market and support services. These former factors explain 65.8% of the variation in entrepreneurship development.

Research limitations/implications

The cross-sectional nature of the study entails that its conclusions be limited to relevant parties.

Practical implications

In conclusion, a broad process to develop entrepreneurship ecosystem initiatives is proposed alongside the crucial roles that governments and other stakeholders should play.

Originality/value

This paper provides the most influential factors in the entrepreneurial ecosystem in Sudan. The study will be among the first studies that focuses on evaluating the existing entrepreneurial ecosystem in Sudan, given that relatively little systematic efforts have been devoted to examine the relationship between ecosystem and entrepreneurship development in Sudan.

Details

World Journal of Entrepreneurship, Management and Sustainable Development, vol. 16 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-5961

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Article
Publication date: 9 October 2020

Zsolt Bedő, Katalin Erdős and Luke Pittaway

Research on entrepreneurial ecosystems has advanced over recent years and has become a popular topic. Despite the interest, previous work has focused on entrepreneurial…

Abstract

Purpose

Research on entrepreneurial ecosystems has advanced over recent years and has become a popular topic. Despite the interest, previous work has focused on entrepreneurial ecosystems in large cities in the United States. Ecosystems in small cities, underpopulated rural areas, university towns and outside the USA have not been considered much. This paper begins to address this deficit by reviewing three groups of literature.

Design/methodology/approach

From the review, the paper builds a conceptual framework to consider entrepreneurial ecosystems led by universities. After summarizing the literature on entrepreneurial ecosystems, entrepreneurial universities and entrepreneurship education, the paper suggests a conceptual framework outlying the structure, components and mechanisms that enable universities to operate as catalysts in the creation of entrepreneurial ecosystems.

Findings

It is evident that on many of the “ingredients” of a successful entrepreneurial ecosystem, a resource-constrained environment would have many gaps. Building an entrepreneurship ecosystem in such contexts would be inherently challenging. The model presented suggests that the presence of a university in such locations should enhance the prospects of progress but that the nature of the university itself would impact any outcomes. Universities that make concerted efforts to be entrepreneurial and that have entrepreneurship programmes have strategies available to them that can enhance entrepreneurship ecosystems over time.

Originality/value

The contribution of this paper is to show “how” a university and its entrepreneurship programme can operationally address deficits in a local ecosystem and how it might bring about positive change. The paper also opens new avenues for entrepreneurship education researchers.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 27 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

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Article
Publication date: 11 September 2017

Philip T. Roundy

The formation of entrepreneurial ecosystems is recognized as an activity that can produce economic development and community revitalization. Social entrepreneurship is…

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5148

Abstract

Purpose

The formation of entrepreneurial ecosystems is recognized as an activity that can produce economic development and community revitalization. Social entrepreneurship is also an activity that is receiving growing attention because of its potential for addressing social and economic problems. However, while scholars have focused on how the participants in entrepreneurial ecosystems, such as investors and support organizations, influence ecosystem functioning, it is not clear what role social entrepreneurs can play in entrepreneurial ecosystems. Nor is it known how the entrepreneurial ecosystems in which social entrepreneurs are located can influence the founding and operation of their ventures. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

In this conceptual paper, theory is proposed to explain the interrelationship between entrepreneurial ecosystems and social entrepreneurship.

Findings

It is theorized that entrepreneurial ecosystems will influence the operations and effectiveness of social entrepreneurs through mechanisms such as the ecosystem’s diversity of resource providers, support infrastructure, entrepreneurial culture, and learning opportunities. In turn, social entrepreneurs can shape the entrepreneurial ecosystems in which they are situated by influencing the heterogeneity of ecosystem participants, garnering attention for the ecosystem, and increasing its attractiveness to stakeholders.

Originality/value

Scholars examining entrepreneurial ecosystems have not studied the role of an increasingly important market actor: the social entrepreneur. At the same time, work on social entrepreneurship has not emphasized the community of social relations and cultural milieu in which social entrepreneurs found their ventures. The theory developed addresses both of these omissions and has important implications for practitioners focused on spurring entrepreneurial ecosystems and social entrepreneurship.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 44 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

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Book part
Publication date: 25 August 2020

Vanessa Ratten and Marthin Nanere

Entrepreneurial ecosystems provide a comprehensive way to understand the complexity of sport entrepreneurship. Due to the competitiveness inherent in the sport system…

Abstract

Entrepreneurial ecosystems provide a comprehensive way to understand the complexity of sport entrepreneurship. Due to the competitiveness inherent in the sport system taking a biological metaphor to understand the development of entrepreneurship is useful. This is helpful in understanding the way diverse entities in the sport industry interact in terms of pursuing entrepreneurial activity. As there are various entities in sport, it helps to take an ecosystem point of view in terms of how they interact. This chapter focuses on how an entrepreneurial ecosystem perspective of sport entrepreneurship is needed to understand the role of stakeholders in the sport industry. Thereby linking the literature on practice theory with entrepreneurship and more specifically entrepreneurial ecosystems.

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Book part
Publication date: 27 December 2018

Ben Spigel

Entrepreneurial ecosystems have quickly become one of the most popular topics in entrepreneurship research. Ecosystems are the characteristics and factors of a place that…

Abstract

Entrepreneurial ecosystems have quickly become one of the most popular topics in entrepreneurship research. Ecosystems are the characteristics and factors of a place that support high-growth entrepreneurship. This provides the ability for the field to provide important policy insights about how to aid the development of high growth, innovative ventures, as well as generate new insights into the relationship between the entrepreneurship phenomenon and the contexts it takes place within. However, work in the field remains undertheorized, with a little understanding of how the entrepreneur benefits from being in a strong ecosystem. This chapter argues that it is helpful to return to Ed Malecki’s work in a previous volume of this series, which explored the importance of networks. His work has contributed to a very broad stream of work on entrepreneurial environment. Using this as a starting point, this chapter distinguishes between “top-down” approaches to study ecosystems, which focus on the actors and factors that make up an ecosystem, and a “bottom-up” approach, which instead examines the ways in which entrepreneurs use their ecosystem to get the resources, knowledge, and support they need. The chapter concludes by suggesting how a research agenda for a bottom-up study of ecosystems can be informed by Malecki’s work.

Details

Reflections and Extensions on Key Papers of the First Twenty-Five Years of Advances
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-435-0

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 16 February 2021

Carson Duan, Kamaljeet Sandhu and Bernice Kotey

Given the importance of immigration and immigrant entrepreneurs in advanced economies, the authors take an entrepreneurial ecosystem perspective to study the home-country…

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1362

Abstract

Purpose

Given the importance of immigration and immigrant entrepreneurs in advanced economies, the authors take an entrepreneurial ecosystem perspective to study the home-country benefits possessed by immigrant entrepreneurs and how home-country entrepreneurial ecosystem factors affect immigrant entrepreneurial motivations, activities and outcomes.

Design/methodology/approach

This conceptual research paper follows McGaghie, Bordage and Shea's (2001) four-step new theory creation process, which suggests that new theories can be created through facts extraction from the extant literature.

Findings

The authors propose that although immigrant entrepreneurs are unable to take full benefit of the host-country entrepreneurial ecosystem due to blocked mobility, they do have capabilities to access and use their home-country entrepreneurial resources and opportunities. The authors further propose that home-country entrepreneurial capital can be systemically analyzed through the framework of the entrepreneurial ecosystem. The results imply that immigrant entrepreneurship as a social and economic phenomenon can be studied more holistically from both host- and home-country perspectives compared to the traditional research boundary of the host-country only.

Research limitations/implications

The research focuses on the identification of home-country effects on immigrant entrepreneurship through the lens of the entrepreneurial ecosystem. Testable propositions provide directions for future empirical research on the field of immigrant entrepreneurship from a home-country perspective. The research concludes that a holistic immigrant entrepreneurship study should consider dual (host- and home-country) entrepreneurial ecosystems.

Practical implications

Immigrant entrepreneurs benefit from both host- and home-country entrepreneurial ecosystems. This paper suggests co-effects of dual entrepreneurial ecosystems lead to a high rate of entrepreneurship and business success within some immigrant groups. Policymakers can increase economic activities by developing and deploying programs to encourage immigrants to embed in host- and home-country entrepreneurial ecosystems.

Originality/value

Based on the framework of the entrepreneurial ecosystem, this paper brings a novel perspective to examining home-country effects on immigrant entrepreneurship. It theoretically conceptualizes that immigrants have higher entrepreneurship rates than native-born populations because they have access to extra home-country entrepreneurial capital.

Details

New England Journal of Entrepreneurship, vol. 24 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2574-8904

Keywords

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