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Article
Publication date: 19 September 2022

Kaihan Krippendorff

At Haier, one of the world’s largest suppliers of kitchen appliances, an initiative successfully transformed a culinary innovation into a novel ?ecosystem brand? ? a…

Abstract

Purpose

At Haier, one of the world’s largest suppliers of kitchen appliances, an initiative successfully transformed a culinary innovation into a novel ?ecosystem brand? ? a rapidly emerging economic model that is disrupting industries from entertainment and electronics to aviation and IT.

Design Methodology Approach

In addition to attracting and engaging users/ customers and employees, the brand must now be effective with a third stakeholder group: ecosystem partners.

Findings

Without a brand that attracts ecosystem partners an ecosystem will not exist.

Practical Implications

Ecosystems use a variety of mechanisms and processes to encourage adherence to a consistent brand.

Originality Value

Because ecosystem companies can continuously customize their offering by configuring the individual value of ecosystem partners in new ways they can compete. in a new way

Details

Strategy & Leadership, vol. 50 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

Book part
Publication date: 4 December 2012

Rajib Shaw and Noralene Uy

The key concept of ecosystem-based adaptation (EbA) is how to think of ecosystem in daily lifestyles (both in urban and rural areas), and how ecosystem-based adaptation…

Abstract

The key concept of ecosystem-based adaptation (EbA) is how to think of ecosystem in daily lifestyles (both in urban and rural areas), and how ecosystem-based adaptation can be a tool to adapt daily lives in changing climatic conditions. Sustainably managing, conserving, and restoring ecosystems so that they continue to provide the services that allow people to adapt to climate change is known as ecosystem-based adaptation. Summarizing the key observations provided in the earlier chapters, this chapter provides the ways of action-oriented ecosystem-based adaptation.

Article
Publication date: 23 August 2022

Josep Alet

This paper aims to explore the dimensions that foster the accomplishment of goals of business ecosystems.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the dimensions that foster the accomplishment of goals of business ecosystems.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper reviews recent contributions to business ecosystems and identifies the key pillars that support the achievement of good results.

Findings

The paper suggests that entanglement with the customers, value sharing based on a holistic win-win approach, organizational entrepreneurship alignment and continuous smart learning are four dimensions of criticality for designing an effective business ecosystem. These four dimensions nurture the relationships between participants and external actors to make ecosystems successful. Entanglement with the customer is critical to the long-term relevance of the value proposition that reinforces companies’ relationships within the second pillar of value sharing in a win-win system. The development is structured in an organizational alignment where entrepreneurship is the engine, from the employees themselves to the largest corporations, and is enriched with continuous learning based on the exploitation of knowledge and big data.

Research limitations/implications

The paper identifies a set of four pillars of business ecosystem design for further empirical analysis by ecosystem researchers.

Practical implications

The paper provides managers and professionals with strategies to develop effective growth within business ecosystems.

Originality/value

The authors contribute a fresh perspective to the business ecosystems literature by identifying four key pillars of success in the current business landscape.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 23 August 2021

Golnar Pooya, Nathan Cheng, Anthony Marshall, Jacob Dencik and Namit Agrawal

Ecosystems’ digitally enabled networks that enhance corporate value propositions by linking corporate units, suppliers, distributors, partners, customers and other…

Abstract

Purpose

Ecosystems’ digitally enabled networks that enhance corporate value propositions by linking corporate units, suppliers, distributors, partners, customers and other stakeholders -- have become the engine that drives performance and strategic impact across economies. Article examines which ecosystem strategies are appropriate for firms in various situations.

Design/methodology/approach

A new IBM Institute for Business Value (IBV) survey of 700 executives involved in decision-making about their organizations’ ecosystem growth and partnering reveals that the companies most focused on ecosystem engagement consistently generate higher growth and more business value.

Findings

Analysis of the executive responses identified four distinct strategic approaches for ecosystem activity – Accelerate, Expand, Ignite and Reposition.

Practical/implications

Success is likely only if firms pursue the right ecosystem strategy for their situation, with the right business partners, executed the right way.

Originality/value

Ecosystems can enhance the value of products or services through both competition and cooperation with partners and rivals. For enterprises battling dislocation and disruption, ecosystems promote agility and resilience and can identify new revenue opportunities. As such, ecosystems have been the essential vehicle for growth and expansion for many corporations.

Details

Strategy & Leadership, vol. 49 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 20 January 2023

Imoh Antai and Nonyelum Lina Eze

In the African context, the threat of the disruption of traditional business value-creation processes, currently facilitated by the growing information technology (IT…

Abstract

Purpose

In the African context, the threat of the disruption of traditional business value-creation processes, currently facilitated by the growing information technology (IT) ecosystem, came with the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. Thus, this paper aims to investigate the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on interfirm relationships within the context of the digital ecosystem in Africa.

Design/methodology/approach

This study employs an explanatory–exploratory qualitative approach from an interpretivist stance to investigate the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on interfirm relationships. The authors conducted seven in-depth interviews with top management executives in a Nigerian technology company, together with the company's archival data that provided the pre, during and post pandemic (2018–2021) business-to-business (B2B) relationship structures, to determine how these relationships have been affected.

Findings

The results suggest that the pandemic had a minimal effect on partnership relationships in the B2B ecosystems of the case company but affected only non-partnership relationships.

Research limitations/implications

The authors' qualitative study is interpretive and the sample size is limited. Hence, there is a need for caution in generalizing the findings. The framework can be further validated across a wider population.

Practical implications

Partnerships can help organizations weather business crises. Consequently, organizations should maintain a healthy number of partnership relations to deal with periods in which challenges emerge in the business landscape. In other words, with tight contracts and a strategic focus on goals and objectives, partnership relations can help organizations weather business crises.

Originality/value

This study builds upon the burgeoning body of literature on digital ecosystems within the African context, which is a relevant contextual contribution.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 36 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 January 2014

Haydn Shaughnessy

This article introduces the concept of a industry phase change. Phase-changes are historical transitions, ones that create a new industry and consumer ecosystem. They are

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Abstract

Purpose

This article introduces the concept of a industry phase change. Phase-changes are historical transitions, ones that create a new industry and consumer ecosystem. They are not merely disruptive technologies.

Design/methodology/approach

A phase-change is marked by a complex transformation in human behavior produced by a new way to satisfy consumption needs. The Kodak case is described.

Findings

A current phase-change sweeping many business sectors is driven by the growing search for competitive advantage through connected ecosystems of stakeholders that co-create value – customers, innovators, partners and communities.

Practical implications

Co-creative ecosystems are a phase-change that requires a new set of executive and management skills, a different culture, a new approach to information, as well as new forms of leadership.

Originality/value

Explains the success factors of the four major types of modern ecosystems: scale ecosystems; creative commons/open source ecosystems; customer ecosystems; and systemic ecosystems. Shows how Kodak was disrupted by its lack of understanding of ecosystems management.

Details

Strategy & Leadership, vol. 42 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 March 2015

Steven Davidson, Martin Harmer and Anthony Marshall

This article identifies a new transactional system–the business ecosystem. It describes the characteristics and drivers of these complex webs of interdependent enterprises…

2500

Abstract

Purpose

This article identifies a new transactional system–the business ecosystem. It describes the characteristics and drivers of these complex webs of interdependent enterprises and other participants which create unique value through synergistic relationships.

Design/methodology/approach

The article explains how innovative organizations can seek new opportunities and develop new competencies in business ecosystems they will explicitly create or participate in.

Findings

Ecosystems provide stimulus for, and a path to organizational and industry transformation – connecting people and organizations in new and different ways, and providing access to skills and expertise often unavailable outside the ecosystem.

Practical implications

The authors have identified a spectrum of ecosystem archetypes that they call the Shark Tank, the Hornet’s Nest, the Wolf Pack and the Lion’s Pride. They analyze the success strategies for each.

Originality/value

This article methodically diagrams the strategies for success in the emerging ecosystem economy. It identifies the key drivers of value in these new kinds of networks and offers corporate leaders actionable advice on how to position their firms in specific types of ecosystems.

Article
Publication date: 20 May 2020

Anthony Marshall, Anthony Lipp, Kazuaki Ikeda and Raj Rohit Singh

Ecosystem partnerships are driving a dramatic change in the nature of business as industries as diverse as banking, automotive and retail are converging in unprecedented…

Abstract

Purpose

Ecosystem partnerships are driving a dramatic change in the nature of business as industries as diverse as banking, automotive and retail are converging in unprecedented ways–and at an unprecedented rate. To learn how leading companies are embracing innovation in ecosystems to drive both value creation and competitiveness, the IBM Institute for Business Value in collaboration with Oxford Economics surveyed 1000 top executives in 19 industries and 29 countries between August and January 2019.

Design/methodology/approach

The survey cohort included 250 Chief Executive Officers, 150 Chief Financial Officers, 150 Chief Innovation Officers, 150 Chief Marketing Officers, 150 Chief Operations Officer and 150 Chief Alliance/Partnership Officers.

Findings

Analysis revealed that organizations with high engagement in ecosystems generate greater revenues from innovation initiatives. Specifically, revenues tied to innovation were more than 14 percent higher for ecosystem-engaged businesses than their less ecosystem-oriented peers.

Practical implications

The analysis showed that organizations differentiated on four innovation-enabling dimensions are more successful than others in ecosystem innovation. Their winning practices: 10;•9;They lead with platforms for innovating in ecosystems. 10;•9;They create the structures that enable the transformation of ideas into desired customer experiences in ecosystems 10;•9;They establish effective, meaningful measurements for successful innovation in ecosystems. 10;•9;They approach innovation with a collaborative mindset and create an environment of openness that shapes innovative behavior. 10;

Originality/value

The study identified the best practices of the most successful companies, ecosystem innovators. They excel across four innovation dimensions. They build platforms and employ ecosystems to better orchestrate customer experiences. They establish processes to effectively measure innovation within ecosystems in which they operate. They form organizational structures that institutionalize innovation. And they create and promote environments of openness and collaboration

Details

Strategy & Leadership, vol. 48 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

Article
Publication date: 14 December 2022

Vanessa Felch and Eric Sucky

Despite the constantly increasing number of publications in the field of business ecosystems, there are indications that a precise definition that appropriately captures…

Abstract

Purpose

Despite the constantly increasing number of publications in the field of business ecosystems, there are indications that a precise definition that appropriately captures the business ecosystem mindset is not yet available. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to provide a consensus definition of business ecosystems.

Design/methodology/approach

Using structured content analysis, this paper examines a total of 43 definitions in terms of their core components.

Findings

The results indicate that the existing definitions focus only on single components, e.g. “network of actors,” thereby omitting other essential components, such as “cocreated value proposition” or “shared fate.” Consequently, it seems appropriate to develop a consensus definition that combines the perspectives of the academic and practitioner communities.

Originality/value

The proposed definition is more comprehensive than the prevailing definitions and represents a synthesis of previous considerations on business ecosystems. Such a definition will support researchers in developing a sound business ecosystem theory that will guide practitioners in the efficient design and management of business ecosystems in the long term.

Details

Journal of Modelling in Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5664

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 January 2023

Fahmi Ali Hudaefi, M. Kabir Hassan and Muhamad Abduh

This study aims at two objectives, i.e. first, to identify the core elements of the Islamic fintech ecosystem, and second, to use the identified core elements to analyse…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims at two objectives, i.e. first, to identify the core elements of the Islamic fintech ecosystem, and second, to use the identified core elements to analyse the development of such an ecosystem in Indonesia.

Design/methodology/approach

This work combines data analytics of text mining with qualitative analysis of human intelligence in two steps. First, knowledge discovery of the Islamic fintech ecosystem’s core elements using a sample of eight academic articles totalling 102 pages and 75,082 words. Second, using the identified core elements from step one to explore such ecosystem development in Indonesia. This stage employs a sample of 11 documents totalling 371 pages and 143,032 words from cyberspace.

Findings

The core elements of the Islamic fintech ecosystem identified are financial customers, fintech startups, government, technology developers, traditional financial institutions and fatwa (Islamic legal opinion). Furthermore, the development of the Islamic fintech ecosystem in Indonesia is examined under these identified core elements, providing critical insights into the Islamic fintech ecosystem currently established in the country's industry.

Research limitations/implications

This study primarily used semi-structured data from cyberspace. Traditional approaches to qualitative data collection, e.g. focused group discussions and interviews, may be beneficial for future studies in addressing the Islamic fintech ecosystem issues.

Practical implications

Academia worldwide may benefit from this work in incorporating knowledge of Islamic fintech ecosystem’s core elements into Islamic finance literature. Specifically, fintech stakeholders in Indonesia may be advantaged to understand how far the Islamic fintech ecosystem has grown in the country.

Social implications

The rise of unethical fintech peer-to-peer lending shows social problems in Indonesia’s fintech industry. The finding derives social implications that elucidate the current state of the country’s Islamic fintech ecosystem.

Originality/value

Using a kind of big data (i.e. semi-structured text data) from cyberspace and applying steps of text mining combined with qualitative analysis, may contribute to the creation of novelties for qualitative research on financial issues.

Details

Qualitative Research in Financial Markets, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4179

Keywords

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