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Article
Publication date: 14 November 2016

Darryll Bravenboer

The purpose of this paper is to contend that collaboration between employers and universities in the design and delivery of programmes of work-based study is an effective…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to contend that collaboration between employers and universities in the design and delivery of programmes of work-based study is an effective way to align the higher-level skills needs of employers with the aspirations of individuals who wish to gain university qualifications in the workplace. In mapping the fluctuations of UK higher-level skills policy through workforce development to degree apprenticeships it is argued that the facility for employers and universities to co-design and develop degree apprenticeship standards should be extended to the development of Higher Apprenticeships in England.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper provides an analysis of a broad range of higher education (HE) skills related UK policy documents to map the fluctuations in policy that underpin the opportunities for employers and universities to collaborate in the design and delivery of HE programmes in England, including degree apprenticeships.

Findings

It is noted that the approach to collaborative employer-university development signalled for degree apprenticeships described in policy documents unhelpfully perpetuates the presumed distinction between “academic learning” and “on the job training”. However, it is also concluded that despite this, the rationale for co-design and delivery should equally apply to the development of all higher apprenticeships to ensure that the expertise that universities can bring in designing and assessing higher-level learning is not unnecessarily excluded from the process.

Originality/value

This paper provides value through its analysis of how the fluctuations of HE and skills policy has affected the basis upon which employers and universities can collaborate in the design and delivery of work-based HE including higher and degree apprenticeships in England. It also seeks to inform HE policy and practice in the development of employer-responsive provision.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 20 October 2014

Sarah Tudor and Richard Mendez

In the UK, universities are coming under increasing pressure from government to strengthen university-employer co-operation and engagement in areas such as student…

Abstract

Purpose

In the UK, universities are coming under increasing pressure from government to strengthen university-employer co-operation and engagement in areas such as student placements, graduate internships, knowledge exchange, enterprise and work-based learning. Both the Higher Education (HE) White Paper (BIS, 2011) and the Wilson Review (BIS, 2012) encourage universities to focus on this agenda, putting businesses at the heart of the system alongside students to maximise innovation, promote growth and “ensure students come out of universities equipped to excel in the workforce”. (BIS, 2011, p. 39). The need for universities to engage with employers and build strong relationships to maximise mutual partnership value is integral to this work. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper examines the application of win-win principles (Covey, 1989) to employer engagement activities in HE via two case studies. Following an analysis of the results in each case study, they show that the adoption of such approaches has enhanced employer engagement, consolidated existing employer relationships and led to tangible outcomes such as new student placement opportunities.

Findings

The paper suggests that HE employer engagement activities grounded in Covey's win-win principles are likely to enhance results and relationships with employers than those that omit such principles. The paper concludes by encouraging the utilisation of such principles across the spectrum of HE employer engagement activities.

Originality value

The authors believe this is the first time this method of analysis has been applied to university-employer relationships.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-based Learning, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2011

Alison Felce

Research into skills level of the workforce in the West Midlands in England has identified a shortage of graduate skills and that these are needed for the region to regain…

Abstract

Purpose

Research into skills level of the workforce in the West Midlands in England has identified a shortage of graduate skills and that these are needed for the region to regain its competitiveness in the national and international markets of the twenty‐first century. The purpose of this paper is to explore the practices that enabled collaboration between higher education organisations to meet the needs of local industries and businesses through work‐place learning.

Design/methodology/approach

The objectives of the case study are to review the background to the initiative described and the organisation and the activities undertaken. The paper reflects on the factors that enabled the collaboration to be effective and on those that jeopardised the potential success of the group. First, an overview of the case is given, starting with the concept for the project that was the focus of the collaboration. Next the organisation of the partnership is outlined and then the process of the development of the foundation degrees. Factors that impact on the effectiveness of the collaboration are explored drawing on illustrative extracts selected from the data.

Findings

Key findings corroborate previous research that posited that success, or failure, of collaboration is due to a number of factors: mutual benefit, a change in product, process or output, stated, emergent and unstated aims, perceived benefits and mutual trust.

Originality/value

The paper demonstrates that even where all these factors exist there may be unanticipated events that impact on the success of the project.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 24 November 2020

Alex F. Leek

The challenge for policing in England and Wales is to evolve how it recruits and educates a workforce able to cope with the demands of contemporary policing. This paper…

Abstract

Purpose

The challenge for policing in England and Wales is to evolve how it recruits and educates a workforce able to cope with the demands of contemporary policing. This paper will examine how forces, who aspire to become learning organisations, have embraced the transition from police training to higher and degree apprenticeships and work-integrated learning. This paper will also benefit practitioners, leaders, provider staff, police staff, policy makers, all who have an interest in police education and the transitions currently being implemented. It also seeks to contribute to the conversation about the transition of policing to a graduate profession and looks to add value, to inform practice, raise standards and enhance policing practice in general.

Design/methodology/approach

Case study and draws on the experience of the collaboration of four universities to develop a national offer to meet the requirements of the Police Education Qualification Framework (PEQF) and how this has been further co-created in partnership with three forces. The data are drawn from first-hand experience of working with university and force colleagues over 18 months, including meeting records, documentation that has been produced and scrutinised by the College of Policing and the four universities through shared, multi-university and force quality assurance and validation processes. This data have been considered against the conceptual framework developed by Senge and others to support an analysis of how the collaborative development activity undertaken has contributed to police forces moving towards becoming learning organisations.

Findings

The findings from the analysis of the forces' engagement with the process of change show that the collaborative development work undertaken is ongoing and does indeed contribute to forces becoming learning organisations. The forces do see the associated benefits, and this may in turn lead to better-trained police officers and more effective force organisations. In addition, the model of collaboration and co-creation that has been adopted can provide a model of good practice for other forces and other universities to follow and from which to learn.

Social implications

An aim of this paper is to encourage the development of police forces for become learning organisations. The implied benefits of this are various but primarily the greatest benefit is aimed at wider society. A more educated, informed and professionally competent police officer, who in turn is part of a learning organisation, will only serve to improve operational policing, community justice and community cohesion.

Originality/value

This paper examines a transition in policing which presents only once in a lifetime. The transition to a degree entry profession is critical to the evolution of policing in England and Wales. The work of the Police Education Consortium (PEC) and the three forces is a new initiative and covers ground not explored previously. This paper offers a conceptual frame to examine these lessons learned from the development of this initiative and partnership, with a view to share that learning across higher education, policing, criminal justice and those involved in degree level apprenticeships. It promotes the view that work-integrated learning, the workplace and higher education can coexist comfortably and engender the development of police forces as learning organisations.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. 10 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

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Article
Publication date: 23 January 2019

Julie Fowlie and Clare Forder

The purpose of this paper is to present a case study centred on steps taken at a Business School in a UK university, to improve local work placement provision, respond to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present a case study centred on steps taken at a Business School in a UK university, to improve local work placement provision, respond to student demand and engage more productively with local businesses. It is situated against renewed focus on universities’ engagement with local economies and the graduate labour market context as demonstrated by the government’s Industrial Strategy (BEIS, 2017) and the OfS (2018) business plan. It aims to emphasise how moving the focus back from graduates to placement students could offer a useful collaborative opportunity for local businesses to articulate what they want from future employees.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper follows a mixed methods approach, drawing upon a case study on a new intervention piloted in the Business School as well as qualitative research gathered from questionnaires and interviews with students. Responses to questionnaires and interviews were analysed thematically in the Grounded Theory (Glaser and Strauss, 1967) tradition.

Findings

The paper highlights the lack of literature on local placements and also demonstrates findings which echo existing research on typical barriers and drivers to placements in general. It offers original outcomes such as how for some students local placements offer a convenience value but for others they are part of committing to living and working locally after graduation.

Research limitations/implications

The small-scale nature of the study means that only indicative findings are presented. Further research is necessary for a more detailed examination of its implications.

Practical implications

Recommendations are made for a systematic approach to developing, or establishing for the first time, university–employer relationships in order to future-proof local placement opportunities.

Originality/value

The paper fills a gap in the literature on local placements and also provides a fresh approach to how universities and employers might work together to identify local skills gaps and increase the provision of local placements. It also offers ways in students’ often negatively framed reasons for not undertaking a placement can be mitigated through engaging with the local context.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

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Article
Publication date: 13 February 2009

Julie Drake, Joanne Blake and Wayne Swallow

The purpose of this paper is to introduce a case study that identifies the practical issues and implications of employer engagement through course design, delivery and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to introduce a case study that identifies the practical issues and implications of employer engagement through course design, delivery and employee commitment in a higher education course delivered in the financial services sector.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a case study the paper draws on the course team (employer and university) experience of a higher education course delivered at a financial services institution over a two cohort period. Student application data and student feedback are used to identify the practical issues arising from course.

Findings

The paper emphasises the importance of understanding the business of the employer, bespoke delivery models and employee commitment for increasing employer participation in higher skills in the work place, particularly for employers not traditionally engaging with universities for course delivery at undergraduate level.

Originality/value

The paper explores issues for employers and universities for design, delivery and sustainability of higher skills in the work place.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 51 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 16 February 2010

Reviews the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoints practical implications from cutting‐edge research and case studies.

Abstract

Purpose

Reviews the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoints practical implications from cutting‐edge research and case studies.

Design/methodology/approach

This briefing is prepared by an independent writer who adds their own impartial comments and places the articles in context.

Findings

When UK internet and phone bank First Direct announced the ground‐breaking and adventurous collaboration between business and academia, with the chance for its staff to study for a foundation degree in business studies, an important lesson was drawn from this Yorkshire‐based success story. After the hard work of engaging and sustaining the essential support of employers, then the really hard work starts – sustaining the interest of employees from enrolment, through delivery and to completion of an award.

Practical implications

Provides strategic insights and practical thinking that have influenced some of the world's leading organizations.

Social implications

Provides strategic insights and practical thinking that can have a broader social impact.

Originality/value

The briefing saves busy executives and researchers hours of reading time by selecting only the very best, most pertinent information and presenting it in a condensed and easy‐to‐digest format.

Details

Development and Learning in Organizations: An International Journal, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7282

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 4 October 2011

Sabina Siebert

The purpose of this paper is to consider whether a university‐based conception of learning in the workplace might bridge the differences that separate the critics and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to consider whether a university‐based conception of learning in the workplace might bridge the differences that separate the critics and advocates of workplace learning promoted by trade unions.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper discusses the role of work‐based learning in trade unions.

Findings

For trade unions the meaning of workplace learning is a contested area. Critics associate it with a corporate oriented policy of upskilling the workforce, premised on a simplified, firm‐specific notion of the human capital theory. In contrast, advocates of workplace learning promoted by trade unions consider it an opportunity to develop the basic and higher level skills of members while revitalising the movement. This paper proposes a way forward for union involvement in work‐based learning that tackles the concerns of radical trade unionists and fulfils the hopes of advocates, namely to work in collaboration with universities.

Originality/value

The literature on the role of trade unions in promoting workplace learning focuses on the tension between critics who challenge a unitarist and consensual view of learning, and advocates who believe that learning partnerships between employers and trade unions facilitate more conciliatory employment relations and create a positive learning environment for the members. This paper assumes a different perspective by proposing a way forward for union involvement in workplace learning, namely to work in collaboration with universities.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2001

Catherine Hare and Julie McLeod

In July 2000, eight BBC staff graduated from the University of Northumbria at Newcastle with an Advanced Diploma in Lifelong Learning (Records Management). This is the…

Abstract

In July 2000, eight BBC staff graduated from the University of Northumbria at Newcastle with an Advanced Diploma in Lifelong Learning (Records Management). This is the first award in a new and innovative framework aimed at meeting the needs of industry in a flexible way. Explains the model for lifelong learning awards, which focuses on the individual or group of individuals and their specific education and development needs, and evaluates its use as part of a training programme at the BBC. The evaluation, based on the views of the student participants, other BBC staff involved and staff from the university, is overwhelmingly positive. The award has had a significant impact on the roles and responsibilities of the BBC staff as well as the status of records management within the BBC. With the collaboration, support and commitment of all those involved, the model was successful in empowering participants both as learners and records professionals.

Details

New Library World, vol. 102 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 30 July 2020

Mohammad Ittshaam Zaheer, Saheed O. Ajayi, Sambo Lyson Zulu, Adekunle Oyegoke and Hadi Kazemi

This study aims to investigate the various competencies a graduate should hold to prepare them for graduate building surveying roles from employers’ perspective.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the various competencies a graduate should hold to prepare them for graduate building surveying roles from employers’ perspective.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses a sequential exploratory mixed-method approach by informing a quantitative study with the finding from a qualitative study.

Findings

Based on exploratory factor analysis, the study found that 13 essential competencies are valued by the employers when recruiting building surveying graduates, as they are requisites for effective job performance. Personal management skills, technical surveying knowledge and knowledge of the Royal Institute of Chartered Surveyor standards are the essential competencies based on the level of variance extracted by the three components. Other competency categories include client management skills, being goal-driven and self-motivated, optimistic personality traits, strong mental resilience, building maintenance and management knowledge and time management skills, among others that are explained in the paper.

Originality/value

The essential competencies were dependent on maintaining a balance between knowledge, skills and personality-based competencies. Measures and approaches for gaining the essential competencies, as well as their level of significance, are further discussed. The study will be of significant benefits to employers of graduate building surveyors, academic institutions that are seeking to improve their graduate employability, as well as students who are preparing for the world of work.

Details

Journal of Engineering, Design and Technology , vol. 19 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1726-0531

Keywords

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