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Article
Publication date: 20 October 2014

Sarah Tudor and Richard Mendez

In the UK, universities are coming under increasing pressure from government to strengthen university-employer co-operation and engagement in areas such as student…

Abstract

Purpose

In the UK, universities are coming under increasing pressure from government to strengthen university-employer co-operation and engagement in areas such as student placements, graduate internships, knowledge exchange, enterprise and work-based learning. Both the Higher Education (HE) White Paper (BIS, 2011) and the Wilson Review (BIS, 2012) encourage universities to focus on this agenda, putting businesses at the heart of the system alongside students to maximise innovation, promote growth and “ensure students come out of universities equipped to excel in the workforce”. (BIS, 2011, p. 39). The need for universities to engage with employers and build strong relationships to maximise mutual partnership value is integral to this work. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper examines the application of win-win principles (Covey, 1989) to employer engagement activities in HE via two case studies. Following an analysis of the results in each case study, they show that the adoption of such approaches has enhanced employer engagement, consolidated existing employer relationships and led to tangible outcomes such as new student placement opportunities.

Findings

The paper suggests that HE employer engagement activities grounded in Covey's win-win principles are likely to enhance results and relationships with employers than those that omit such principles. The paper concludes by encouraging the utilisation of such principles across the spectrum of HE employer engagement activities.

Originality value

The authors believe this is the first time this method of analysis has been applied to university-employer relationships.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-based Learning, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

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Article
Publication date: 16 October 2017

Gary Davies, Melisa Mete and Susan Whelan

The purpose of this paper is to test whether employee characteristics (age, gender, role and experience) influence the effects of employer brand image, for warmth and…

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2460

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to test whether employee characteristics (age, gender, role and experience) influence the effects of employer brand image, for warmth and competence, on employee satisfaction and engagement.

Design/methodology/approach

Members of the public were surveyed as to their satisfaction and engagement with their employer and their view of their employer brand image. Half were asked to evaluate their employer’s “warmth” and half its “competence”. The influence of employee characteristics was tested on a “base model” linking employer image to satisfaction and engagement using a mediated moderation model.

Findings

The base model proved valid; satisfaction partially mediates the influence of employer brand image on engagement. Age, experience gender, and whether the role involved customer contact moderate both the influence of the employer brand image and of satisfaction on engagement.

Practical implications

Engagement varies with employee characteristics, and both segmenting employees and promoting the employer brand image differentially to specific groups are ways to counter this effect.

Originality/value

The contexts in which employer brand image can influence employees in general and specific groups of employees in particular are not well understood. This is the first empirical study of the influence of employer brand image on employee engagement and one of few that considers the application of employee segmentation.

Details

Journal of Organizational Effectiveness: People and Performance, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2051-6614

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2021

Anja Špoljarić and Ana Tkalac Verčič

This study aims to contribute to the understanding of internal communication and its connections to engagement and employer brands. The authors wanted to test the…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to contribute to the understanding of internal communication and its connections to engagement and employer brands. The authors wanted to test the relationship between the three variables and explore if employees' perception of employer brands is affected by internal communication satisfaction and engagement. Creating a desirable employer brand can have significant benefits for organizations, such as higher employee satisfaction, employee engagement and retention. It is crucial to have a clear grasp of how the determinants of these relationships affect each other.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 1,805 employees participated in a large communication survey that measured internal communication satisfaction, employee engagement and perception of employer brand (operationalized as employer attractiveness). To test the relationship between variables, the authors used multiple regression analysis.

Findings

The results show internal communication satisfaction and employee engagement as significant predictors of employer brand. All of the internal communication satisfaction dimensions and two out of three employee engagement dimensions have been identified as determinants of at least two employer attractiveness dimensions.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations include using a cross-sectional dataset, which reduces the possibility of determining causality, using self-reports and a common source bias.

Originality/value

The authors added to the body of knowledge by analyzing the effects of workplace attitudes on attitudes toward the organization. The authors found that both internal communication satisfaction and employee engagement significantly shape the perception of employer brands.

Details

Journal of Communication Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-254X

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Article
Publication date: 3 January 2020

Poonam Chawla

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the impact of employer branding strategy (a mechanism used by organisations to hire and retain competent talent) on employee…

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1266

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the impact of employer branding strategy (a mechanism used by organisations to hire and retain competent talent) on employee engagement whilst simultaneously measuring the mediating effect of person-organisation (P-O) fit.

Design/methodology/approach

The study analyses a sample of 296 employees working in the BPO sector in India. The proposed model is tested with the help of structural equation modelling.

Findings

The findings of the research highlight that employer branding has an affirmative relationship with P-O fit and employee engagement. The findings also reveal that P-O effect has a partial mediating effect on the relationship between employer branding and employee engagement.

Practical implications

Understanding and implementing employer branding strategies provides the organisation with a tool for not only harnessing good employees but also facilitates them to engage and retain them. Employer branding strategies ensure an increase in employee’s sense of belongingness and alignment of goals. Value congruence in the form of person organisation fit also ensures that employees believe that they are valued across the organisation and may go an “extra mile” to achieve organisational objectives.

Originality/value

Employer branding is a comprehensive strategy which can be used by employers to attract and retain talented employees. In a global economy where a talented workforce is scarce and has plenty of choices available to them, firms can use employer branding as a strategic opportunity to enhance employee engagement.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 52 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

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Article
Publication date: 7 November 2017

Sangeeta Sahu, Avinash Pathardikar and Anupam Kumar

The purpose of this paper is to report the findings of a study which examines the relationship between transformational leadership and intention to leave through the…

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10181

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report the findings of a study which examines the relationship between transformational leadership and intention to leave through the mediating role of employee engagement, employer branding, and psychological attachment.

Design/methodology/approach

Transformational leadership, employee engagement, employer branding, and psychological attachment were assessed in an empirical study based on a sample of 405 full-time employees working in information technology (IT) organizations in India. The data which were obtained using Google doc and a printed questionnaire was analyzed through structural and measurement model.

Findings

The results reveal that transformational leadership style directly influences employee intention to leave. Transformational leadership and employer branding is mediated by employee engagement. The leadership relation with psychological attachment is mediated by employer branding.

Practical implications

The implications of the study are of utmost importance for Indian IT industries facing high voluntary turnover in recent times. Transformational leaders in teams contribute to develop employee engagement, employer branding, and psychological attachment. Imparting transformational leadership training to team leaders can help in generating psychological attachment with the employees which would go a long way.

Originality/value

This study explores the relationship among transformational leadership style, employee engagement, employer branding, and psychological attachment which has not been explored theoretically and tested empirically in an Indian context.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 39 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 12 April 2013

Margaret Harris, Colin Chisholm and George Burns

The purpose of this paper is to provide a conceptual viewpoint which proposes the use of the post graduate Knowledge Transfer Partnership (KTP) approach to learning in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a conceptual viewpoint which proposes the use of the post graduate Knowledge Transfer Partnership (KTP) approach to learning in undergraduate education and practice‐based training.

Design/methodology/approach

This is an examination of the KTP approach and how this could be used effectively in undergraduate education and training to encourage and increase practice‐based learning and employer engagement. The methodology consists of a literature review, and a case study of the KTP approach. The literature reviewed examines the KTP approach, employer engagement in education and strategic government approaches to stimulate investment in knowledge and skills for workforce development, and the development of practice‐based learning in the UK. The KTP provides a case study to illustrate a successful model of employer engagement, which benefits all parties to it, and assists with the strategic development required by successive governments.

Findings

The suggestions are based on the authors’ investigation and their understanding and experience of: the KTP approach; practice‐based learning; undergraduate education; and learning and teaching approaches. The paper suggests that the KTP approach (normally a post‐graduate model) could be extended to undergraduate education to provide sustainable practice‐based learning that fits well with the strategies and ideologies of government, employers and academia.

Practical implications

Barriers to employer and academic engagement, such as that linked to the confused terminology used to describe practice‐based learning, and competing political ideologies, should be researched further to gain a better understanding of how to mitigate these in order to make the KTP approach in undergraduate education successful. The implications are that synergistic development of the KTP approach in an increased range of academic and workplace partnerships needs to be done before a fully tested model could be agreed.

Originality/value

The originality is the idea of utilising a well acknowledged post‐graduate model of learning within an undergraduate environment. The value is to increase the awareness of the benefits of the KTP and how the approach could be adapted for use in undergraduate environments for the eventual benefit of students, academics, employers and policy makers.

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Article
Publication date: 31 May 2019

This paper aims to review the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoint practical implications from cutting-edge research and case studies.

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374

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to review the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoint practical implications from cutting-edge research and case studies.

Design/methodology/approach

This briefing is prepared by an independent writer who adds their own impartial comments and places the articles in context.

Findings

This research paper demonstrates that, to varying extents, the perception of an employer’s brand is subject to variation across employees of different ages, genders, experience levels, and role types. An employer increasing their perceived warmth has a greater impact on employee satisfaction and engagement than an employer increasing their perceived competence.

Originality/value

The briefing saves busy executives and researchers hours of reading time by selecting only the very best, most pertinent information and presenting it in a condensed and easy-to-digest format.

Details

Human Resource Management International Digest , vol. 27 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-0734

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2020

Elissa Tucker

This paper aims to define the employee experience as a concept, give an overview of how employers are using it as an engagement approach and discuss two examples of how…

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1077

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to define the employee experience as a concept, give an overview of how employers are using it as an engagement approach and discuss two examples of how leading organizations are leveraging more advanced applications of the employee experience to drive better engagement outcomes.

Design/methodology/approach

In 2019, APQC surveyed 231 HR professionals responsible for the engagement strategy at organizations with more than 1,000 employees and greater than US$500m in revenue. The survey results represent employers from 30 industries and 34 headquarters countries.

Findings

Most employers have made the employee experience part of their employee engagement strategy. Employers reporting the best outcomes from their engagement strategy are significantly more likely to train leaders, managers and HR on the employee experience concept and leverage critical elements from the employee experience design methodology.

Originality/value

This paper explains the reasons for the growing popularity of the employee experience, discusses its potential as a method for employee engagement and concludes with an overview and examples of the steps involved in employee experience design.

Details

Strategic HR Review, vol. 19 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1475-4398

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Article
Publication date: 17 February 2012

Tracey White

The purpose of this paper, from a work‐based learning practitioner perspective, is to present an insight into some of the challenges, benefits and impacts associated with…

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1089

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper, from a work‐based learning practitioner perspective, is to present an insight into some of the challenges, benefits and impacts associated with workforce development and employer responsive provision (ERP). The focus is learning, which is designed to meet an organization's needs and intended for groups of learners to develop their skills, whilst bringing tangible benefits to their organization.

Design/methodology/approach

Focusing upon experiences of managing an employer engagement, action research project, which worked with over 40, small and medium‐sized enterprises and more recently working with three major corporate organisations, this paper provides a personal perspective of engaging with organizations. It draws upon primary data from personal experiences and action research of working with employers and learners, and secondary data, such as the Higher Education Impact Study (2008) and the Higher Education Regional Development Agency's Skills for Growth report (2009). After setting the context, this paper will consider ERP and its challenges, in terms of organizational needs meeting academic tradition. This is supported with case study anecdotes, before a consideration of the impacts and benefits of ERP from an organizational perspective.

Findings

This paper provides insights into effective ERP and the elements needed to support its success. With probable continued growth in ERP, it is imperative that HEIs with ERP strategies understand the associated challenges and benefits. It suggests that in order to promote sustainable ERP activity, HEIs will need to consider a more strategic approach concerning the staff engaging in ERP activities.

Practical implications

From a work‐based learning practitioner perspective, this paper presents an insight into some of the challenges, benefits and impacts associated with workforce development and employer responsive provision (ERP).

Originality/value

This paper draws together current thinking on ERP with practice‐based application and understanding in order to inform and develop practice. It offers practical insights and experiences which build upon various bodies of literature to present identified elements necessary for successful engagement with employers. As the literature around ERP at present is fairly small, this paper offers a valuable insight into successful practice, building usable models for people working in this field.

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Article
Publication date: 13 February 2009

Julie Drake, Joanne Blake and Wayne Swallow

The purpose of this paper is to introduce a case study that identifies the practical issues and implications of employer engagement through course design, delivery and…

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7986

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to introduce a case study that identifies the practical issues and implications of employer engagement through course design, delivery and employee commitment in a higher education course delivered in the financial services sector.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a case study the paper draws on the course team (employer and university) experience of a higher education course delivered at a financial services institution over a two cohort period. Student application data and student feedback are used to identify the practical issues arising from course.

Findings

The paper emphasises the importance of understanding the business of the employer, bespoke delivery models and employee commitment for increasing employer participation in higher skills in the work place, particularly for employers not traditionally engaging with universities for course delivery at undergraduate level.

Originality/value

The paper explores issues for employers and universities for design, delivery and sustainability of higher skills in the work place.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 51 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

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