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Article
Publication date: 7 April 2015

Connie Zheng, John Molineux, Soheila Mirshekary and Simona Scarparo

Work-life balance (WLB) is an issue of focus for organisations and individuals because individuals benefit from having better health and wellbeing when they have WLB and

Abstract

Purpose

Work-life balance (WLB) is an issue of focus for organisations and individuals because individuals benefit from having better health and wellbeing when they have WLB and this, in turn, impacts on organisational productivity and performance. The purpose of this paper is to explore relevant WLB factors contributing to employee health and wellbeing, and to understand the interactive effects of individual WLB strategies and organisational WLB policies/programmes on improving employee health and wellbeing.

Design/methodology/approach

Using the data collected from 700 employees located in Queensland, Australia, multiple regression analysis was conducted to examine the variables related to individual WLB strategies and organisational WLB programmes. Several multiple regression models were used to evaluate interrelated relationships among these variables and their combined effects on employee health and wellbeing.

Findings

The authors found that employees exercising their own WLB strategies showed better health conditions and wellbeing that those who do not; they were also more capable of achieving WLB. Both availability and usage of organisational WLB programmes were found to help employees reduce their stress levels, but interestingly to have no direct association with WLB and employee health. Several control variables such as age, working hours, education level and household incomes were found to have moderate effects on employee health and wellbeing.

Originality/value

Employee health and wellbeing are determined by multiple factors. In distinguishing from prior research in this field, this study discovers an important interface between individual WLB strategies and organisational provision of WLB policies/programmes supplemented by several exogenous factors in addressing overall employee health and wellbeing. The results have implications for organisational delivery of WLB policies and other human resource management practices to support employees.

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Article
Publication date: 2 November 2010

Mikael Holmgren Caicedo, Maria Mårtensson and Robin Roslender

The purpose of this paper is to identify the case for taking employee health and wellbeing into account in some way and to consider a range of objections that might be…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify the case for taking employee health and wellbeing into account in some way and to consider a range of objections that might be raised against such exercises.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper identifies the existence of a persistent sickness absence as a cause for concern for a range of stakeholders and how it might be accounted for in the light of recent developments within the intellectual capital field. Attention then turns to some of the difficulties such well meaning interventions might encounter, and briefly considers how a self‐accounting approach might in some part overcome these.

Findings

The paper finds that a programme of empirical research within the field of employee health and wellbeing is now required to ensure that employee health and wellbeing into account.

Practical implications

While predominantly a discursive contribution to the literature, the paper incorporates some discussion of innovative accounting interventions.

Originality/value

In contrast to viewing sickness absence from a cost perspective, the paper encourages stakeholders to embrace a wider spectrum of ways of seeing to better understand employee health and wellbeing issues in the work place.

Details

Journal of Accounting & Organizational Change, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1832-5912

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2013

Gen Barron

Medtronic needed a comprehensive, integrated, measurable and global approach to employee wellness. Its primary focus was putting the critical factors of prevention and

Abstract

Purpose

Medtronic needed a comprehensive, integrated, measurable and global approach to employee wellness. Its primary focus was putting the critical factors of prevention and early detection at the forefront of its employee health rewards. The ability to monitor and measure health and wellbeing across the organization was also vital in giving Medtronic key insight, through analytics, into the impact that employee health had on the business. This paper aims to examine this approach.

Design/methodology/approach

Medtronic's Total Health global employee wellness brand focused on investing in health rather than the cost of treatment and improving employee health through behavior change. Seeing that the web was critical to delivery and collection of information in this environment it sought an online health and wellbeing platform with the capability to be deployed globally.

Findings

Initial health assessments conducted through the online platform have provided essential baseline data to understand overall global health trends as well as territory specific differences and priorities. Medtronic has been able to establish an average employee health score. Digging deeper it has noted priority health indicators for global employees based on the number who are recorded to be “at risk” in each case.

Originality/value

Successful use of analytics and web‐based tools has helped Medtronic accelerate towards its vision of personalized, consistent wellbeing support for all employees. It now has greater insight into their health status to define the right strategy, and the tools to drive targeted initiatives where they are needed.

Details

Strategic HR Review, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1475-4398

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 2 September 2014

Virginia Dickson-Swift, Christopher Fox, Karen Marshall, Nicky Welch and Jon Willis

Factors for successful workplace health promotion (WHP) are well described in the literature, but often sourced from evaluations of wellness programmes. Less well…

Abstract

Purpose

Factors for successful workplace health promotion (WHP) are well described in the literature, but often sourced from evaluations of wellness programmes. Less well understood are the features of an organisation that contribute to employee health which are not part of a health promotion programme. The purpose of this paper is to inform policy on best practice principles and provide real life examples of health promotion in regional Victorian workplaces.

Design/methodology/approach

Individual case studies were conducted on three organisations, each with a health and wellbeing programme in place. In total, 42 employers and employees participated in a face to face interview. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and the qualitative data were thematically coded.

Findings

Employers and senior management had a greater focus on occupational health and safety than employees, who felt that mental/emotional health and happiness were the areas most benefited by a health promoting workplace. An organisational culture which supported the psychosocial needs of the employees emerged as a significant factor in employee's overall wellbeing. Respectful personal relationships, flexible work, supportive management and good communication were some of the key factors identified as creating a health promoting working environment.

Practical implications

Currently in Australia, the main focus of WHP programmes is physical health. Government workplace health policy and funding must expand to include psychosocial factors. Employers will require assistance to understand the benefits to their business of creating environments which support employee's mental and emotional health.

Originality/value

This study took a qualitative approach to an area dominated by quantitative biomedical programme evaluations. It revealed new information about what employees really feel is impacting their health at work.

Details

International Journal of Workplace Health Management, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8351

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 5 September 2019

Puja Khatri and Pragya Gupta

The purpose of this paper is to conceptualize a suitable measure for the employee wellbeing construct and validate this tool in Indian workplace settings, especially with…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to conceptualize a suitable measure for the employee wellbeing construct and validate this tool in Indian workplace settings, especially with reference to IT/ITes and BFSI sectors.

Design/methodology/approach

This study is descriptive and cross-sectional in nature. The literature was first reviewed to identify the underlying probable dimensions of employee wellbeing and its corresponding items. These items were then subjected to elaborate discussions with experts from industry as well as academia. The index, thus, developed was administered to collect primary data from employees working in IT/ITeS and BFSI sectors based in Delhi-NCR. PLS SEM 3 was applied as employee wellbeing was construed as a first-order reflective second-order formative construct. Thereafter, it was subjected to suitable assessments of reliability and convergent validity.

Findings

The findings reveal that employee wellbeing can be conceptualized as a construct having four dimensions namely, purpose in life (PIL), work–life balance (WLB), job wellness (JW) and physical wellness (PW). It was also revealed that all the dimensions identified in the study capture different facets of the employee wellbeing and collectively define the construct; omission of any items may lead to change in the nature of the construct. This investigation is unique as it frames the index of employee wellbeing with specifications of a formative measurement model. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, no published study so far has measured EWB as a formative construct.

Originality/value

Many earlier studies have incorporated a unidimensional approach to individual wellbeing and lacked a crucial outlook of having multi-dimensional understanding of the employee wellbeing construct in the social and work context. Furthermore, this paper contributes not only to the existing body of knowledge in employee wellbeing, but also brings forth an important aspect of measurement model specification, i.e. formative measurement model by bringing the specific reasons for taking employee wellbeing as a formative concept.

Details

International Journal of Workplace Health Management, vol. 12 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8351

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 9 August 2013

Jos Akkermans, Veerle Brenninkmeijer, Seth N.J. van den Bossche, Roland W.B. Blonk and Wilmar B. Schaufeli

The purpose of this paper is to identify job characteristics that determine young employees' wellbeing, health, and performance, and to compare educational groups.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify job characteristics that determine young employees' wellbeing, health, and performance, and to compare educational groups.

Design/methodology/approach

Using the job demands‐resources (JD‐R) model and 2‐wave longitudinal data (n=1,284), the paper compares employees with a lower educational level with employees with a high educational level.

Findings

Young employees with lower educational level reported fewer job resources (autonomy and social support), more physical demands, less dedication, more emotional exhaustion, and poorer health and performance compared with the highly educated group. Differences were also found between educational groups in the relationships in the JD‐R model, most notably a reciprocal association between dedication and performance, and between emotional exhaustion and performance in the group with lower levels of education.

Research limitations/implications

The results support the main processes of the JD‐R model, supporting its generalizability. However, differences were found between educational groups, implying that the motivational and health impairment processes differ across educational levels.

Practical implications

HR consultants and career counselors may focus especially on increasing job resources and motivation for young employees with lower educational level. Performing well is also important for these young workers to become more dedicated and less exhausted.

Social implications

It is important to recognize and intervene on unique characteristics of different educational groups with regard to wellbeing, health, and performance in order to maintain a healthy and productive young workforce.

Originality/value

For the first time, predictions of the JD‐R model are tested among young employees with different educational backgrounds.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 7 March 2008

Nicole Renee Baptiste

The purpose of the paper is to show that, though essential, the achievement of business‐oriented performance outcomes has obscured the importance of employee wellbeing at…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the paper is to show that, though essential, the achievement of business‐oriented performance outcomes has obscured the importance of employee wellbeing at work, which is a neglected area of inquiry within the field of human resource management. Instead the emphasis typically placed on the business case for HRM suggests a one‐sided focus on organisational outcomes at the expense of employees. With this in mind, this paper seeks to examine the effects of HRM practices on employee wellbeing and performance.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from a public sector (local government) organisation to identify the link between HRM practices, employee wellbeing at work, and performance. A preliminary staff survey of employees provides a brief overview of the link between HRM practices, employee wellbeing at work and performance.

Findings

HRM practices adopted have a significant impact on employee wellbeing at work and tend to be more positive than negative. Overall a consistent result in the study was that management relationship behaviour in the form of support and development of trust, promoted employee wellbeing at work amongst workers. In general, the findings will prove helpful to human resource practitioners, management, policy makers and business practice.

Research limitations/implications

HRM practices that help to maximise employee wellbeing at work are not necessarily the same as those that make up “high performance” HR practices. Moreover, the promotion of wellbeing at work is not likely to be a result of the HRM practices but can be linked to line management leadership and relationships.

Practical implications

The importance of management relationships, support and employees' trust was found to predict wellbeing at work. The decision by management to embrace the business case for employee wellbeing at work is likely to complement more conventional methods of improving employee attitudes and productivity, which in turn can enhance organisational effectiveness and decision making.

Originality/value

This paper builds on existing work within HRM and provides a framework for establishing the linkage between HRM practices, employee wellbeing at work and performance in the public sector that it is suggested could improve individual and organisational outcomes through enhanced efficiency and productivity.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 46 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 22 June 2012

Kay Greasley, Paul Edwards, Denise Baker‐McClearn and Jeremy Dale

Many studies look at the effects of human resource (HR) initiatives. Yet very few consider why organisations adopt them in the first place. Health and wellbeing

Abstract

Purpose

Many studies look at the effects of human resource (HR) initiatives. Yet very few consider why organisations adopt them in the first place. Health and wellbeing interventions offer a critical case because they offer apparent benefits for all. Assessing the process of engagement reveals variations in managerial commitment, which has implications for studies of “effects”. This paper seeks to address these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

The study offered a free health intervention to organisations; this was separate from the research study, which aimed to assess the effects. A total of 86 organisations were approached, of which 53 indicated some interest in involvement. After further withdrawals and selection against criteria of size and sector, nine remained. The paper assesses the degree of engagement with the study, looking in detail at three organisations. The methods utilised included structured telephone interviews, qualitative interviews and observation.

Findings

The organisations underwent a rigorous selection procedure to ensure their full commitment to the study. On this basis it is expected that the participating organisations would be highly engaged. However, it became clear that there were considerable variations in how they engaged. This reflected the favourability of the organisational context, but also the enthusiasm and commitment of key actors.

Originality/value

Engaged organisations were a highly self‐selected group. Studies of effects of interventions may thus be systematically biased. The interventions studies here were also shaped by how they were put into practice; they were not fixed things whose effects could be understood independently of their implementation. The study was also able to make predictions of the subsequent effects of the interventions based on the process of implementation. The results of a follow‐up study to test these predictions will be reported in a further paper.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 34 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 4 November 2014

Holly Blake, Eleanor Bennett and Mark E. Batt

The purpose of this paper is to ascertain which employees choose to access occupational health checks (OHCs), their perceptions of the usefulness of information received…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to ascertain which employees choose to access occupational health checks (OHCs), their perceptions of the usefulness of information received and whether they choose to act on tailored advice provided.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 253 hospital employees attended workplace OHC then completed online questionnaire survey.

Findings

Participants included new cases (80 per cent) and those who had accessed the service previously (20 per cent), all age categories (23-69 years) and all occupational groups, although the vast majority were in office-based sedentary job roles, nursing or allied health professions (AHP) (78.3 per cent). Almost half were overweight or obese (46.7 per cent); many reported existing health problems or family history of chronic disease. Participants perceived OHC s to be convenient, informative and useful for raising their awareness of health issues, reassurance and monitoring, early identification of potential health problems and signposting to appropriate services. Participants reported post-check dietary changes (41 per cent) and increases in physical activity (30 per cent); smokers reported quitting or cutting down (44 per cent) and those exceeding alcohol limits reported cutting frequency or units of consumption (48 per cent). More than half those advised to visit their GP complied (53 per cent).

Research limitations/implications

Future studies should investigate the efficacy of OHCs and whether reported lifestyle changes are sustained in the long-term.

Originality/value

General health checks can be feasibly delivered in a multi-site hospital workplace setting with diverse appeal. Provision of tailored health information can help to raise health awareness and motivate health behaviour change or maintenance amongst hospital employees, including those reporting risk factors for chronic disease. Employees value the investment of healthcare organisations in the health and wellbeing of their workforce.

Details

International Journal of Workplace Health Management, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8351

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 7 September 2010

Howard Kahn, Joanna E. Stevenson and Robin Roslender

The purpose of this paper is to report and discuss the principal findings of a recent study of thinking and practice about workforce health and wellbeing among UK…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report and discuss the principal findings of a recent study of thinking and practice about workforce health and wellbeing among UK accounting and finance and human resource management professionals.

Design/methodology/approach

The data informing the paper were collected using postal questionnaires to two samples of 1,000 UK accounting and finance and human resource directors. The research design incorporated the facility for a full second mailing to respondents.

Findings

The responses received from the sample of human resource directors were generally more supportive of viewing workforce health and wellbeing as a valuable organisational asset. Accounting and finance professionals employed in private sector organisations were the least enthusiastic about such issues.

Research limitations/implications

While the design of the questionnaire afforded the opportunity for commentary on answers by respondents, semi‐structured interviews will allow a more detailed exploration of the issues.

Practical implications

The UK accountancy profession has yet to fully appreciate the significance of the intellectual capital phenomenon. In seeking to engage health and wellbeing issues, it may be desirable to consider collaboration with the human resource management profession.

Originality/value

Health and wellbeing have seldom been recognised as key constituents of human capital. Consequently, this is the first such study to be carried out.

Details

Journal of Human Resource Costing & Accounting, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1401-338X

Keywords

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