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Article
Publication date: 19 October 2021

Inho Hwang, Sanghyun Kim and Carl Rebman

Organizations invest in information security (IS) technology to be more competitive; however, implementing IS measures creates environmental conditions, such as overload…

Abstract

Purpose

Organizations invest in information security (IS) technology to be more competitive; however, implementing IS measures creates environmental conditions, such as overload uncertainty, and complexity, which can cause employees technostress, eventually resulting in poor security performance. This study seeks to contribute to the intersection of research on regulatory focus (promotion and prevention) as a type of individual personality traits, technostress, and IS.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey questionnaire was developed, collecting 346 responses from various organizations, which were analyzed using the structural equation model approach with AMOS 22.0 to test the proposed hypotheses.

Findings

The results indicate support for both the direct and moderating effects of security technostress inhibitors. Moreover, a negative relationship exists between promotion-focused employees and facilitators of security technostress, which negatively affects strains (organizational commitment and compliance intention).

Practical implications

Organizations should develop various programs and establish a highly IS-aware environment to strengthen employees' behavior regarding IS. Furthermore, organizations should consider employees' focus types when engaging in efforts to minimize security technostress, as lowering technostress results in positive outcomes.

Originality/value

IS management at the organizational level is directly related to employees' compliance with security rather than being a technical issue. Using the transaction theory perspective, this study seeks to enhance current research on employees' behavior, particularly focusing on the effect of individuals' personality types on IS. Moreover, this study theorizes the role of security technostress inhibitors for understanding employees' IS behaviors.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

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Article
Publication date: 30 September 2021

Sheldon Carvalho, Charles Carvalho and Fallan Kirby Carvalho

Existing research on challenging experiences has focused primarily on the positive outcomes of these experiences for individuals and organizations. However, some studies…

Abstract

Purpose

Existing research on challenging experiences has focused primarily on the positive outcomes of these experiences for individuals and organizations. However, some studies have also highlighted the potential downsides to these experiences. This paper offers recommendations for organizations, including specific actions and interventions to foster development using challenging experiences.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors reviewed the academic and practitioner literature on challenging experiences to formulate their recommendations.

Findings

Based on a review of the literature, the authors offer five recommendations for organizations to manage challenging experiences effectively and, thus, foster the development of their employees.

Originality/value

The authors hope that the adoption of their five recommendations may assist organizations in improving their leadership bench strength.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 6 October 2021

Godfred Matthew Yaw Owusu

In this study, the author examines the effect of financial knowledge, financial attitude and responsible financial management behaviour on financial satisfaction and…

Abstract

Purpose

In this study, the author examines the effect of financial knowledge, financial attitude and responsible financial management behaviour on financial satisfaction and investigates the association between financial satisfaction and psychological wellbeing of individuals. The author examines these relationships having controlled for the influence of key demographic variables including age, gender, marital status, income level and employment status of respondents on the predicted relationships.

Design/methodology/approach

Data was gathered by means of a self-administered questionnaire to postgraduate business students from a large public university in Ghana. The hypothesized relationships of the study were tested using the Partial Least Square Structural Equation Modelling (PLS-SEM) technique.

Findings

The author shows from the structural model analysis using the bootstrapping procedure that financial knowledge, financial attitude and sound financial management behaviour have important implications on financial satisfaction levels of individuals. Further, the author finds financial satisfaction to be an important predictor of the psychological wellbeing of individuals.

Practical implications

The paper highlights the relevance of financial satisfaction on the psychological wellbeing of an individual and identifies some of the dominant factors that are associated with financial satisfaction.

Originality/value

This study examines the concept of financial satisfaction at the individual level and uniquely highlights the psychological implications of financial satisfaction.

Details

Journal of Humanities and Applied Social Sciences, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2632-279X

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Article
Publication date: 15 October 2021

Karun Pratoom

This study aims to examine the effects of trait goal orientations (mastery, performance-prove and performance-avoid goals) on individual-level absorptive capacity (AC)…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the effects of trait goal orientations (mastery, performance-prove and performance-avoid goals) on individual-level absorptive capacity (AC), ultimately adaptive performance. This study also explores the cross-level moderating effects of transformational leadership climate on these mediated relationships.

Design/methodology/approach

Data from 480 participants in 76 teams from accounting firms in Northeast Thailand were analyzed using the multilevel method.

Findings

Findings showed support for positive indirect effects from approach-related goal orientations (mastery and performance-prove) to adaptive performance via AC and a negative indirect effect from avoid goal orientation to adaptive performance via AC. Results showed that a transformational leadership climate strengthens the relationship between goal orientations and AC, but only when team members have a high level of approach-related goals.

Originality/value

This study extends previous work by providing an understanding of how a transformational leadership context and the differences in goal orientations interact to promote or impede an individual's AC. It also extends our understanding of the mechanism of how AC mediated the effects of trait goal orientations and transformational leadership climate on adaptive performance.

Details

Baltic Journal of Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5265

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Article
Publication date: 6 October 2021

Andy Susilo Lukito-Budi, Nurul Indarti and Kusdhianto Setiawan

This study investigates the development of absorptive capacity. Using an integrated cognitive learning perspective, this study provides empirical evidence about the…

Abstract

Purpose

This study investigates the development of absorptive capacity. Using an integrated cognitive learning perspective, this study provides empirical evidence about the conceptual absorptive capacity model through examining the full process step by step. Two groups of moderating variables were studied—namely, social integration and appropriability—to examine their impact on the process.

Design/methodology/approach

This study employed a longitudinal study from a community service program (Kuliah Kerja Nyata) at Universitas Gadjah Mada, Yogyakarta, Indonesia, by using surveys at the beginning and the end of the project. Of 492 teams from 2,444 students participated in the study. Each individual within a team had at least one project assigned to him/her during the project. The absorptive capacity process was examined through six consecutive models and analysed using hierarchical linear modelling. The moderating variables were tested using the Moderated Regression Analysis and Wald tests.

Findings

The study confirms the full cycle of absorptive capacity as an independent, dynamic and complex process; it involves acquiring, assimilating, transforming and exploiting sequencing variables from the individual level to the team level and vice versa using feed-forward and feedback mechanisms adopted from the 4I framework of organisational learning. However, the roles of the moderating variables are still inconclusive due to some possible factors, which were also reflected by the U-phenomenon.

Originality/value

This study provides vital support to the learning theory as well as to the organisation learning concept. This study also reveals empirical evidence about the unsupported moderating variables behave during a project cycle, such as what they function, how they evolve and what we should do about the moderating factors during a project. The findings of this study provide practical suggestions and highlight areas for future research.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2021

Bronwyn Howell and Petrus H. Potgieter

The Australian and New Zealand governments have released smartphone-based apps to complement contact tracing in the event that they face a resurgence of COVID-19…

Abstract

Purpose

The Australian and New Zealand governments have released smartphone-based apps to complement contact tracing in the event that they face a resurgence of COVID-19 infections. The apps form part of both countries’ policies to support a return to social and economic engagement following extended lockdowns. This paper aims to investigate the extent to which the two approaches are fit for purpose and compare their functional characteristics.

Design/methodology/approach

Using process mapping and analysis, this paper evaluates the potential of the two apps to improve the performance of existing contact tracing systems across a range of efficiency and effectiveness criteria with an emphasis on the framework proposed by Verrall (2020).

Findings

The Bluetooth-based Australian app appears likely to assist that country’s contact tracing system to perform more efficiently and effectively in the event of a resurgence of the virus and should increase confidence in re-engagement. The New Zealand QR code-based app, however, is not well-aligned with these objectives. Its interaction with a range of other regulations and obligations, combined with the inconvenience it imposes on its users, is likely to militate against its use. Bluetooth-based apps based on interactions between individuals likely better support these population-based objectives than QR code-based location-specific apps.

Originality/value

This paper provides an original and extensive analysis of the functionality and effectiveness of Australia and New Zealand’s official contact-tracing apps.

Details

Digital Policy, Regulation and Governance, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-5038

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 2 September 2021

Amany Yashoa Gad

This paper aims to identify the level of contribution of different levels of education to remaining in unemployment as well as the transition from unemployment to…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to identify the level of contribution of different levels of education to remaining in unemployment as well as the transition from unemployment to employment in Egypt.

Design/methodology/approach

In this paper, transition probabilities matrix differentiated by gender, age groups, educational levels, marital status and place of residence based on worker flows across employment, unemployment and out of labor force states during the period 2012–2018 using Egypt Labor Market Panel Survey of 2018. The results point to the highly static nature of the Egyptian labor market. Employment and the out of labor force states are the least mobile among labor market states. This is because employment state is very desirable and the out of labor force is the largest labor market states, especially for females. Also, this study examines the impact of different educational levels separately on remaining in unemployment and transition from unemployment to employment state using eight binary logistic regression models.

Findings

The main results of transitions from unemployment to employment are relatively large for males, elder-age, uneducated workers as well as workers who are not married and urban residents, and the results of the logistic regression models consistent with the transition probabilities matrix results, except for few cases. Based on the above findings, there is enough evidence to accept the null hypothesis that no education has a positive significant impact to transition unemployed individuals from unemployment to employment, while less than intermediate as well as higher education have a negative significant impact to transition unemployed individuals from unemployment to employment.

Originality/value

This paper proposes to address the problem of the unemployment among highly educated which is much higher compared with illiterates and try to understand the impact of different levels of education separately on the transition from unemployment to employment, to help the policymakers to eradicate the gap between education and the demand of the labor market in Egypt.

Details

Review of Economics and Political Science, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2356-9980

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Article
Publication date: 7 September 2021

Alex Scrimpshire and Marcia Lensges

The purpose of this paper is to study how the interplay of the emotion of fear and the personality trait of resilience affect time to reemployment after job termination…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study how the interplay of the emotion of fear and the personality trait of resilience affect time to reemployment after job termination. The authors carried out the research by extending affective events theory (AET) beyond the workplace.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is a conceptual paper intended to lay the groundwork for future analysis in the areas of fear and resilience, specifically in the time after job termination.

Findings

The paper suggests that fear is a natural response to job termination, and there are two responses to fear: one of action to rid oneself of fear (“fight or flight”) and one of paralysis, in which an individual remains in a fear state. The authors put forth that one's level of resilience is a factor in determining time to reemployment.

Originality/value

While there are numerous studies on the role emotions play in the workplace and in particular, the role of fear about potentially getting fired, there are few, if any, studies on the role of fear after losing a job. The authors feel this is a warranted area of study as fear can have both positive and negative responses. The authors also contend that a major diver of these fear responses is an individual's level of resilience, and this can be a significant predictor of the individual's time to reemployment.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 20 September 2021

Amna Akhound, Aseem Majeed Rizvi, Waqar Ahmed and Muhammad Nadeem Khan

Energy-saving behavior of individuals is essential to minimize energy use and reduce the emission of toxic gases. This study's actual focus is to find out the determinants…

Abstract

Purpose

Energy-saving behavior of individuals is essential to minimize energy use and reduce the emission of toxic gases. This study's actual focus is to find out the determinants of the energy-saving behavior of individuals in the workplace.

Design/methodology/approach

As a theoretical research model, the extended theory of planned behavior (TPB) has been used to analyze the determinants of energy-saving intentions. A survey method is used to collect 289 valid data, and structural equation modeling (SEM) is used to analyze the data.

Findings

The final result shows that the variables attitude at home, subjective norm (SN) and descriptive norms positively impact intention to save energy at the workplace. In contrast, the construct attitude and perceived behavior control is insignificant in this research. On the other hand, the personal moral norm (PMN) is a powerful predictor of individual energy-saving intentions at the workplace.

Originality/value

This research provides insights that will help the organizations understand the behavior of individuals at the workplace for energy-saving intentions to formulate such policies that will enhance individuals' practice for energy savings.

Details

Management of Environmental Quality: An International Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7835

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Article
Publication date: 16 September 2021

Selim Aren and Hatice Nayman Hamamci

This study aims to examine the impact of conscious and unconscious processes on risky investment intention. In this framework, the effect of individual cultural values and…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the impact of conscious and unconscious processes on risky investment intention. In this framework, the effect of individual cultural values and phantasy on risky investment intentions was investigated. In addition, the mediating role of phantasy in the relationship between individual cultural values and risky investment intentions was also analyzed.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected between May 14, 2020 and June 01, 2020, when our graduate students voluntarily shared the online survey link on their social networks. In this way, 1,934 people in total answered the questionnaire. To test the study model, structural equation modeling (SEM) was performed using the AMOS program. In addition, ANOVA and independent sample t-test analyses were conducted using the SPSS program to analyze whether individual cultural values and risky investment intent differ according to demographic variables.

Findings

According to the analysis results, power distance, collectivism, masculinity and long-term orientation are seen as antecedents of phantasy. While a positive relationship was found between power distance, collectivism and risky investment intention, a negative relationship was found between uncertainty avoidance and risky investment intention. Statistical findings regarding the mediating effect of phantasy on the relationship between individual cultural values and risky investment intentions were also determined. In addition to these, the differences in individual cultural values and risky investment intentions according to age, education level, sex and marital status were investigated. Individuals with the highest uncertainty avoidance level were in the 41–50 age group. Individuals with the highest long-term orientation level were individuals aged 41 and over. Individuals with the lowest risky investment intentions were in the +51 age group. Collectivism and power distance did not differ according to age. There were no differences in the relevant variables according to the level of education. Males have higher levels of risky investment intention, power distance, masculinity and collectivism than females, and married individuals have higher levels of uncertainty avoidance, masculinity and collectivism than singles.

Originality/value

This study is the first to investigate the impact of conscious and unconscious processes on risky investment intentions together. On the other hand, the number of studies empirically investigating the relationship between phantasy and risky investment intention is quite limited, and the authors have also provided the findings for the existence of a relationship between these two variables.

Details

Journal of Economic and Administrative Sciences, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1026-4116

Keywords

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