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Article
Publication date: 5 September 2019

Puja Khatri and Pragya Gupta

The purpose of this paper is to conceptualize a suitable measure for the employee wellbeing construct and validate this tool in Indian workplace settings, especially with…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to conceptualize a suitable measure for the employee wellbeing construct and validate this tool in Indian workplace settings, especially with reference to IT/ITes and BFSI sectors.

Design/methodology/approach

This study is descriptive and cross-sectional in nature. The literature was first reviewed to identify the underlying probable dimensions of employee wellbeing and its corresponding items. These items were then subjected to elaborate discussions with experts from industry as well as academia. The index, thus, developed was administered to collect primary data from employees working in IT/ITeS and BFSI sectors based in Delhi-NCR. PLS SEM 3 was applied as employee wellbeing was construed as a first-order reflective second-order formative construct. Thereafter, it was subjected to suitable assessments of reliability and convergent validity.

Findings

The findings reveal that employee wellbeing can be conceptualized as a construct having four dimensions namely, purpose in life (PIL), work–life balance (WLB), job wellness (JW) and physical wellness (PW). It was also revealed that all the dimensions identified in the study capture different facets of the employee wellbeing and collectively define the construct; omission of any items may lead to change in the nature of the construct. This investigation is unique as it frames the index of employee wellbeing with specifications of a formative measurement model. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, no published study so far has measured EWB as a formative construct.

Originality/value

Many earlier studies have incorporated a unidimensional approach to individual wellbeing and lacked a crucial outlook of having multi-dimensional understanding of the employee wellbeing construct in the social and work context. Furthermore, this paper contributes not only to the existing body of knowledge in employee wellbeing, but also brings forth an important aspect of measurement model specification, i.e. formative measurement model by bringing the specific reasons for taking employee wellbeing as a formative concept.

Details

International Journal of Workplace Health Management, vol. 12 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8351

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Article
Publication date: 4 March 2021

Poonam Mehta and Jyoti Sharma

There is dearth of studies in the literature which have discussed the relevance of personal and social resources of employees to protect them from adverse impacts of…

Abstract

Purpose

There is dearth of studies in the literature which have discussed the relevance of personal and social resources of employees to protect them from adverse impacts of emotional job demands. However, interaction effect of these two resources on wellbeing of the employees in context to emotional work is inadequate. The present study is aimed to address the existing gap and investigate the relevance of personal and social resources as moderators in the presence of each other between emotional work and employee wellbeing.

Design/methodology/approach

The research work has focused on employees working on frontline profiles of civil aviation industry of north India. The responses of 720 frontline employees have been collected through pretested questionnaire. To understand the moderation effect of two variables, model number 3 developed by Hayes (2012) has been applied.

Findings

The findings have revealed that moderator role of social support between emotional work and employee wellbeing. However, research has pointed out that at high level of social support personal resources of employees' start to decline which subsequently reduces the wellbeing of employees.

Research limitations/implications

The present research work has analysed the moderated moderation effect of personal and social resources between emotional work and employee wellbeing. Besides, the relative significance of personal resources vis-a vis social resources empirically in context of employee wellbeing in case of emotional work has also been highlighted in the work.

Practical implications

The results of the study have suggested the employees to receive less social support from friends, family and other significant relationships to protect their personal resources in emotional work settings. Moreover, research work has implicated for employers to draw out the various interventions through which personal resources of employees can be enhanced in emotional work settings. Also, the research has assisted in designing the key competencies for different job domains of emotional work setups.

Social implications

The present study is very substantial in offering various parameters over which wellbeing policies for individuals can be framed. Also, the study has outlined the consequences of receiving different levels of social support which is applicable for that set of population who wants to enhance their personal resources for attaining high wellbeing.

Originality/value

The study has empirically investigated interaction effect of social and personal resources of employees between emotional work and employee wellbeing which is scarce in the literature. Besides, a dark side of social support in emotional work context has also been highlighted which was scarcely discussed in emotional work settings previously.

Details

Asia-Pacific Journal of Business Administration, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-4323

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Article
Publication date: 7 March 2008

Nicole Renee Baptiste

The purpose of the paper is to show that, though essential, the achievement of business‐oriented performance outcomes has obscured the importance of employee wellbeing at…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the paper is to show that, though essential, the achievement of business‐oriented performance outcomes has obscured the importance of employee wellbeing at work, which is a neglected area of inquiry within the field of human resource management. Instead the emphasis typically placed on the business case for HRM suggests a one‐sided focus on organisational outcomes at the expense of employees. With this in mind, this paper seeks to examine the effects of HRM practices on employee wellbeing and performance.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from a public sector (local government) organisation to identify the link between HRM practices, employee wellbeing at work, and performance. A preliminary staff survey of employees provides a brief overview of the link between HRM practices, employee wellbeing at work and performance.

Findings

HRM practices adopted have a significant impact on employee wellbeing at work and tend to be more positive than negative. Overall a consistent result in the study was that management relationship behaviour in the form of support and development of trust, promoted employee wellbeing at work amongst workers. In general, the findings will prove helpful to human resource practitioners, management, policy makers and business practice.

Research limitations/implications

HRM practices that help to maximise employee wellbeing at work are not necessarily the same as those that make up “high performance” HR practices. Moreover, the promotion of wellbeing at work is not likely to be a result of the HRM practices but can be linked to line management leadership and relationships.

Practical implications

The importance of management relationships, support and employees' trust was found to predict wellbeing at work. The decision by management to embrace the business case for employee wellbeing at work is likely to complement more conventional methods of improving employee attitudes and productivity, which in turn can enhance organisational effectiveness and decision making.

Originality/value

This paper builds on existing work within HRM and provides a framework for establishing the linkage between HRM practices, employee wellbeing at work and performance in the public sector that it is suggested could improve individual and organisational outcomes through enhanced efficiency and productivity.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 46 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 7 April 2015

Connie Zheng, John Molineux, Soheila Mirshekary and Simona Scarparo

Work-life balance (WLB) is an issue of focus for organisations and individuals because individuals benefit from having better health and wellbeing when they have WLB and…

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16620

Abstract

Purpose

Work-life balance (WLB) is an issue of focus for organisations and individuals because individuals benefit from having better health and wellbeing when they have WLB and this, in turn, impacts on organisational productivity and performance. The purpose of this paper is to explore relevant WLB factors contributing to employee health and wellbeing, and to understand the interactive effects of individual WLB strategies and organisational WLB policies/programmes on improving employee health and wellbeing.

Design/methodology/approach

Using the data collected from 700 employees located in Queensland, Australia, multiple regression analysis was conducted to examine the variables related to individual WLB strategies and organisational WLB programmes. Several multiple regression models were used to evaluate interrelated relationships among these variables and their combined effects on employee health and wellbeing.

Findings

The authors found that employees exercising their own WLB strategies showed better health conditions and wellbeing that those who do not; they were also more capable of achieving WLB. Both availability and usage of organisational WLB programmes were found to help employees reduce their stress levels, but interestingly to have no direct association with WLB and employee health. Several control variables such as age, working hours, education level and household incomes were found to have moderate effects on employee health and wellbeing.

Originality/value

Employee health and wellbeing are determined by multiple factors. In distinguishing from prior research in this field, this study discovers an important interface between individual WLB strategies and organisational provision of WLB policies/programmes supplemented by several exogenous factors in addressing overall employee health and wellbeing. The results have implications for organisational delivery of WLB policies and other human resource management practices to support employees.

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Article
Publication date: 23 August 2021

Jnaneswar K and M.M. Sulphey

Mental wellbeing brings in multiple benefits to employees and their organizations like better decision-making capacity, greater productivity, resilience and so on. The…

Abstract

Purpose

Mental wellbeing brings in multiple benefits to employees and their organizations like better decision-making capacity, greater productivity, resilience and so on. The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship of a few antecedents of mental wellbeing like workplace spirituality, mindfulness and self-compassion, using structural equation modeling (SEM).

Design/methodology/approach

Using the convenience sampling method, data were collected from 333 employees of various organizations in India and SEM was performed using the R Program to test the hypotheses.

Findings

Results suggest that mindfulness and self-compassion influenced the mental wellbeing of employees. It was also observed that workplace spirituality has a significant influence on both mindfulness and self-compassion.

Originality/value

An in-depth review of the literature revealed that no previous studies had examined the complex relationship between workplace spirituality, mindfulness, self-compassion and the mental wellbeing of employees. This research suggests that workplace spirituality, mindfulness and self-compassion are important factors that influence employees' mental wellbeing, and it empirically tests this in a developing country context. The present study enriches the literature studies on mental wellbeing, mindfulness, self-compassion and workplace spirituality by integrating “mindfulness to meaning theory”, “socio-emotional selectivity theory”, and “broaden and build theory”.

Details

South Asian Journal of Business Studies, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-628X

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Article
Publication date: 2 November 2010

Mikael Holmgren Caicedo, Maria Mårtensson and Robin Roslender

The purpose of this paper is to identify the case for taking employee health and wellbeing into account in some way and to consider a range of objections that might be…

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3541

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify the case for taking employee health and wellbeing into account in some way and to consider a range of objections that might be raised against such exercises.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper identifies the existence of a persistent sickness absence as a cause for concern for a range of stakeholders and how it might be accounted for in the light of recent developments within the intellectual capital field. Attention then turns to some of the difficulties such well meaning interventions might encounter, and briefly considers how a self‐accounting approach might in some part overcome these.

Findings

The paper finds that a programme of empirical research within the field of employee health and wellbeing is now required to ensure that employee health and wellbeing into account.

Practical implications

While predominantly a discursive contribution to the literature, the paper incorporates some discussion of innovative accounting interventions.

Originality/value

In contrast to viewing sickness absence from a cost perspective, the paper encourages stakeholders to embrace a wider spectrum of ways of seeing to better understand employee health and wellbeing issues in the work place.

Details

Journal of Accounting & Organizational Change, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1832-5912

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Article
Publication date: 23 February 2010

Gordon Tinline and Kim Crowe

The purpose of this paper is to present how Mersey Care NHS Trust introduced a unique integrated leadership development and employee wellbeing programme from UK business…

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3211

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present how Mersey Care NHS Trust introduced a unique integrated leadership development and employee wellbeing programme from UK business psychologists, Robertson Cooper, to help it prepare for Foundation Trust equivalent (FTe) status. A priority for the Trust was to ensure that staff felt involved and supported throughout the restructure and felt good about coming to work and engaged by their roles.

Design/methodology/approach

Robertson Cooper designed a programme to integrate management and leadership development with work to assess and improve levels of employee engagement and wellbeing. It used its employee survey ASSET to measure the levels of psychological wellbeing, engagement and productivity of employees in Mersey Care NHS Trust and assess the impact of the change.

Findings

Using the results, individual employee action plans were designed to improve wellbeing and engagement, and inform managers about how to address staff priorities and become more effective leaders. Of the senior managers and clinicians who completed the evaluation, 83 percent agreed that the content of the development centres met their expectations.

Originality/value

The paper describes a concrete example of how Mersey Care NHS Trust is improving employee engagement by focusing on wellbeing.

Details

Strategic HR Review, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1475-4398

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Article
Publication date: 5 October 2010

Veronika I.D. Buech, Alexandra Michel and Karlheinz Sonntag

Suggestion systems offer the opportunity for organizations to benefit directly from their employees' innovativeness. The purpose of this paper is to investigate processes…

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4419

Abstract

Purpose

Suggestion systems offer the opportunity for organizations to benefit directly from their employees' innovativeness. The purpose of this paper is to investigate processes underlying employees' involvement with suggestion systems. It examines the relationship between interactional justice of the suggestion system, valence of the suggestion system (VSS), employees' wellbeing, and their motivation to submit suggestions.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected in a German manufacturing company. In total, 142 questionnaires were completed (response rate: 71 percent). The paper applies the bootstrapping method in order to test the hypothesized relationships.

Findings

Results support the hypothesized moderated mediation model, in that VSS mediated the positive relationship between interactional justice and motivation to submit suggestions when wellbeing was high or moderate, but not when wellbeing was low.

Research limitations/implications

The results reflect only subjective appraisals. However, the studied variables are ultimately based on what employees perceive. Nonetheless, future research should generate and include more objective measures.

Practical implications

The paper provides evidence, first, that companies should consider the important role of employees' wellbeing in the innovation context and try to enhance it. Second, the interactional justice and the VSS contribute to employees' motivation to submit suggestions and should be strengthened.

Originality/value

While the existing literature mostly focuses on innovative behaviour in general, this paper analyzes employees' motivation to submit suggestions.

Details

European Journal of Innovation Management, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1460-1060

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 11 January 2016

Matthew Xerri, Rod Farr-Wharton, Yvonne Brunetto and Dennis Lambries

The purpose of this paper is to compare the impact of management and colleagues on the perception of work harassment and outcomes of local government employees in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to compare the impact of management and colleagues on the perception of work harassment and outcomes of local government employees in Australia and the USA.

Design/methodology/approach

Completed surveys from local government employees (265 from the USA and 250 from Australia) were analysed using structural equation modelling and an ANOVA.

Findings

The results depict support for the overall measurement and structural models showing that workplace relationships impact on work harassment, and in turn employee outcomes (psychological wellbeing and Organisational Citizenship Behaviour-Individual (OCB-I)), although not all paths were accepted for each country. Statistically significant differences were found between the Australian and USA samples for both the measurement and structural models, with the sample from the USA showing much higher levels of satisfaction with workplace relationships, higher levels of psychological wellbeing, OCB-I, and lower perceptions of work harassment.

Practical implications

The findings provide implications that Australian and US local government employees, positioned closest to the public, experience work harassment probably as a result of chronic under-resourcing both in terms of manpower and other resources, and coupled with unrealistically high-performance targets. The results depict that such work harassment is resulting in lower psychological wellbeing (USA only) and lower extra-role behaviour associated with OCB-I (Australia and USA).

Originality/value

The value of this paper is that it benchmarks the impact of workplace relationships on work harassment for local government employees across two Anglo-American countries.

Details

International Journal of Public Sector Management, vol. 29 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3558

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Article
Publication date: 20 July 2010

A.J. McMurray, A. Pirola‐Merlo, J.C. Sarros and M.M. Islam

This exploratory study aims to examine the effects of leadership on organizational climate, employee psychological capital, commitment, and wellbeing in a…

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12332

Abstract

Purpose

This exploratory study aims to examine the effects of leadership on organizational climate, employee psychological capital, commitment, and wellbeing in a religious/church‐based non‐profit organization.

Design/methodology/approach

Leadership effects are investigated using established scales including the transformational leadership scale, (TLS), organizational climate questionnaire (OCQ), positive and negative affect scale (PANAS), psychological capital (PsyCap), and organizational commitment. It is a context‐based study that considers a unique organizational culture that comprises social, political, economic, technological, personnel, and personal facets. The survey was administered across a large religious/church‐based non‐profit organization.

Findings

The findings show strong positive relationships between employee ratings of their immediate supervisor's transformational leadership and employee ratings of organizational climate, wellbeing, employee commitment and psychological capital. Additional analyses which explored the impact of demographic variables revealed older employees recorded significantly higher scores on psychological capital than younger employees. These findings inform organizational sustainability where the principles of socially responsible management practices form the heart of responsible stewardship.

Research limitations/implications

Risks of method variance or response biases are likely as all data are drawn from employee surveys, and some selection bias as respondents could not be directly compared with non‐respondents.

Originality/value

This study makes a significant contribution to the non‐profit literature by providing further evidence of the impact of leadership on organizational climate, with the added dimensions of psychological capital, employee wellbeing, and commitment adding to the knowledge of these relationships.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 31 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

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