Search results

1 – 10 of over 2000

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Building Pathology and Adaptation, vol. 40 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-4708

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Building Pathology and Adaptation, vol. 38 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-4708

Article
Publication date: 1 November 2018

Kinjiro Amano, Eric C.W. Lou and Rodger Edwards

Building information modelling (BIM) is a digital representation of the physical and functional characteristics of a building. Its use offers a range of benefits in terms of…

Abstract

Purpose

Building information modelling (BIM) is a digital representation of the physical and functional characteristics of a building. Its use offers a range of benefits in terms of achieving the efficient design, construction, operation and maintenance of buildings. Applying BIM at the outset of a new build project should be relatively easy. However, it is often problematic to apply BIM techniques to an existing building, for example, as part of a refurbishment project or as a tool supporting the facilities management strategy, because of inadequacies in the previous management of the dataset that characterises the facility in question. These inadequacies may include information on as built geometry and materials of construction. By the application of automated retrospective data gathering for use in BIM, such problems should be largely overcome and significant benefits in terms of efficiency gains and cost savings should be achieved.

Design/methodology/approach

Laser scanning can be used to collect geometrical and spatial information in the form of a 3D point cloud, and this technique is already used. However, as a point cloud representation does not contain any semantic information or geometrical context, such point cloud data must refer to external sources of data, such as building specification and construction materials, to be in used in BIM.

Findings

Hyperspectral imaging techniques can be applied to provide both spectral and spatial information of scenes as a set of high-resolution images. Integrating of a 3D point cloud into hyperspectral images would enable accurate identification and classification of surface materials and would also convert the 3D representation to BIM.

Originality/value

This integrated approach has been applied in other areas, for example, in crop management. The transfer of this approach to facilities management and construction would improve the efficiency and automation of the data transition from building pathology to BIM. In this study, the technological feasibility and advantages of the integration of laser scanning and hyperspectral imaging (the latter not having previously been used in the construction context in its own right) is discussed, and an example of the use of a new integration technique is presented, applied for the first time in the context of buildings.

Details

Journal of Facilities Management, vol. 17 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-5967

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 26 January 2022

The-Quan Nguyen, Eric C.W. Lou and Bao Ngoc Nguyen

This paper aims to provide an integrated BIM-based approach for quantity take-off for progress payments in the context of high-rise buildings in Vietnam. It tries to find answers…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide an integrated BIM-based approach for quantity take-off for progress payments in the context of high-rise buildings in Vietnam. It tries to find answers for the following questions: (1) When to start the QTO processes to facilitate the contract progress payments? (2) What information is required to measure the quantity of works to estimate contract progress payment (3) What are the challenges to manage (i.e. create, store, update and exploit)? What are the required information for this BIM use? and (4) How to process the information to deliver BIM-based QTO to facilitate contract progress payment?

Design/methodology/approach

The paper applied a deductive approach and expert consensus through a Delphi procedure to adapt to current innovation around BIM-based QTO. Starting with a literature review, it then discusses current practices in BIM-based QTO in general and high-rise building projects in particular. Challenges were compiled from the previous studies for references for BIM-based QTO to facilitate contract progress payment for high-rise building projects in Vietnam. A framework was developed considering a standard information management process throughout the construction lifecycle, when the BIM use of this study is delivered. The framework was validated with Delphi technique.

Findings

Four major challenges for BIM-based QTO discovered: new types of information required for the BIM model, changes and updates as projects progress, low interoperability between BIM model and estimation software, potentiality of low productivity and accuracy in data entry. Required information for QTO to facilitate progress payments in high-rise building projects include Object Geometric/Appearance Information, Structural Components' Definition and Contextual Information. Trade-offs between “Speed – Level of Detail–Applicable Breadth” and “Quality – Productivity” are proposed to consider the information amount to input at a time when creating/updating BIM objects. Interoperability check needed for creating, authoring/updating processing the BIM model's objects.

Research limitations/implications

This paper is not flawless. The first limitation lies in that the theoretical framework was established only based on desk research and small number of expert judgment. Further primary data collection would be needed to determine exactly how the framework underlies widespread practices. Secondly, this study only discussed the quantity take-off specifically for contract progress payment, but not for other purposes or broader BIM uses. Further research in this field would be of great help in developing a standard protocol for automatic quantity surveying system in Vietnam.

Originality/value

A new theoretical framework for BIM-based QTO validated with Delphi technique to facilitate progress payments for high-rise building projects, considering all information management stages and the phases of information development in the project lifecycle. The framework identified four types of information required for this QTO, detailed considerations for strategies (Library Objects Development, BIM Objects Information Declaration, BIM-based QTO) for better managing the information for this BIM use. Two trade-offs of “Speed – LOD–Applicable Breadth” and “Quality – Productivity” have been proposed for facilitating the strategies and also for enhancing the total efficiency and effectiveness of the QTO process.

Details

International Journal of Building Pathology and Adaptation, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-4708

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 26 March 2021

Eric C.W. Lou, Angela Lee and Yoke Mui Lim

While there is an established body of literature that discusses the importance of stakeholder management, and also the need for involvement of all stakeholders so that all values…

Abstract

Purpose

While there is an established body of literature that discusses the importance of stakeholder management, and also the need for involvement of all stakeholders so that all values of a heritage site can be captured in a heritage management plan, the concepts are not generally developed in ways that make them useful in practice. This research seeks to bring greater clarity to the practice of stakeholder engagement in built heritage, so that organisations can manage their stakeholders in ways that meet their strategic goals. This study proposes a novel method to identify stakeholders, a stakeholder preference mapping approach, which will depict their influence on decisions based on a of power-interest scale.

Design/methodology/approach

This research posits a stakeholder preference mapping approach. Virtual Stakeholder Groups (VSG) were identified and stakeholder's significance impacts were measured using the RIBA Plan of Work 2013 to determine in-depth consideration of each stakeholder's power and interest against differing stages of a heritage project. Participants were convened through a 5-day workshop, consisting of 20 Malaysian and 19 international participants (80% academics and 20% Malaysian civil servants). The Multi-Attribute Decision Analysis (MADA) technique was then used to demonstrate how stakeholder identification and analysis can be used to help heritage teams meet their mandates.

Findings

The research identified eight virtual VSG (Extremist, Expert, Economic, Social, Governance and Tourists) and their scale of power-interest influence at different stages of the heritage management process. The findings reveal varying levels of engagement from each of the different groups of stakeholders at each work stage – with Stage 5 (Construction) being the least engaged.

Originality/value

It is anticipated that through stakeholder preference mapping, heritage teams can increase the robustness of their strategies by identifying and effectively managing the important concepts; heritage teams can effectively manage the interface between the many (often competing) demands of differing stakeholders. Using Georgetown as a case study, the research team were able to delineate the interaction and interplay between the various stakeholders in the complex decision-making processes for a UNESCO heritage site. Applying the RIBA 2013 Plan of Work as a framework to the heritage management process enables a formalised mapping approach to the process.

Details

Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1266

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 17 August 2010

E.C.W. Lou and J.S. Goulding

Electronic readiness (e‐readiness) presents a measure to which an organisation or business may be ready, prepared or willing to obtain benefits which arise from the digital…

Abstract

Purpose

Electronic readiness (e‐readiness) presents a measure to which an organisation or business may be ready, prepared or willing to obtain benefits which arise from the digital economy. In this context, an advanced state of organisational e‐readiness is needed for businesses to expand domestically and internationally; to compete readily in the global open market. It is therefore imperative that organisations align their business strategies with e‐readiness strategies. This paper aims to focus on these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper investigates the initiation, development and practice of e‐readiness of nations, and presents a case for possible adoption for the built environment area. By combining key indicators of e‐readiness of nations and achieving business success and competitive advantage, the pervasiveness of e‐readiness within the built environment arena is determined. The validity of this initial research is further endorsed through industry collaboration research.

Findings

The relationship between people, process, and technology are common themes and enablers of e‐readiness. In this respect, built environment organisations are no different. These elements are highly interrelated, as developing competence in one element must be accompanied by improvement in the others. Contextually therefore, the key elements of organisational e‐readiness should embody each nation's (national) e‐readiness reports, rankings, assessments and measuring tools as their fundamental building blocks.

Originality/value

This paper presents an argument that the industry needs to adopt a “measured approach” to help them be “e‐ready” – the rubrics of which should be augmented through some form of a practical framework which allows them to measure their e‐readiness capability. This paper postulates that any such model should embrace both the “hard” and “soft” issues associated with people, technology, and process.

Details

Journal of Systems and Information Technology, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1328-7265

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 23 September 2019

Felipe Mellado, Eric C.W. Lou and Christian L. Correa Becerra

There is a long-standing interest in performance improvement within the construction industry. Approaches based upon cost, time and quality (often called the Iron Triangle), have…

1299

Abstract

Purpose

There is a long-standing interest in performance improvement within the construction industry. Approaches based upon cost, time and quality (often called the Iron Triangle), have been the focus of attention despite criticism of the validity of the Iron Triangle as a performance measure due to its simplistic approach. Furthermore, little emphasis has been placed on synthesising performance to understand whether this concept has evolved from the traditional view. An analysis of prominent literature was reviewed by classifying performance indicators which establish criteria for measuring performance in the construction industry. The purpose of this paper is to review the literature (1998–2018) on performance at a project level to determine a final rank of key performance indicators (KPIs) which will establish how projects are currently being measured.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper uses a combined qualitative and quantitative approach – a comprehensive literature review on overall performance at a project level and the statistical Kendall’s W test to find concordance among the authors on performance in the construction industry to determine a final rank of KPIs.

Findings

The results demonstrate there is no congruent correlation on what performance is and the traditional iron triangle of “cost-time-quality” is still the preferred method of analysing performance, despite it being proven to be ineffective.

Originality/value

Performance in the construction industry is an ambiguous concept that can be interpreted differently by the construction industry’s stakeholders. Despite this lack of concordance, a starting point on the definition of performance can be obtained from the literature. The paper presents a final rank of KPIs.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 27 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 26 February 2018

Moath Al Yahya, Martin Skitmore, Adrian Bridge, Madhav Nepal and David Cattell

The purpose of this paper is to varied a conceptual model for e-Tendering readiness in any construction organisation prior of implementing e-Tendering system.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to varied a conceptual model for e-Tendering readiness in any construction organisation prior of implementing e-Tendering system.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on conceptual model called e-Tendering readiness model (e-TRM), this paper empirically examines the e-TRM’s interactions and causal relationships between e-Tendering constructs and e-Tendering readiness. The paper uses the structural equation modelling technique to test the hypothesised positive inter-relationships. A questionnaire survey is conducted for respondents of construction organisations in Saudi Arabia to understand their current e-Tendering readiness and importance of e-Tendering variables.

Findings

Supported by empirical evidence, this paper recognised that three out of nine constructs have direct influences on the e-Tendering readiness. However, one of the constructs, which is for the first time hypothesised and tested has the most effect.

Research limitations/implications

Ultimately, the empirical test for the e-TRM is conducted in certain case (Saudi Arabia); however, the e-TRM needs to be tested in other case area for more verification.

Practical implications

The study findings update previous information technology/information system models in construction by adding this tested model to the research literature on traditional and electronic tendering and the body of knowledge in the construction industry.

Originality/value

The service providers construct is proposed and tested for the first time, which is necessary to support the successful e-Tendering implementation.

Details

Construction Innovation, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-4175

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 December 2020

Phui Fung Wong, Fah Choy Chia, Mee San Kiu and Eric C.W. Lou

Prior literature lacks concrete and systematic review of the current blockchain application in smart sustainable city that covered to the full extent of various components. Thus…

Abstract

Purpose

Prior literature lacks concrete and systematic review of the current blockchain application in smart sustainable city that covered to the full extent of various components. Thus, this study explores the integration of blockchain technology in making the city smarter, safer and sustainable.

Design/methodology/approach

This study conducted a systematic literature review of 49 publications published globally. Data were analysed by coding of the publications whereby the codes were generated based on frequency of appearance (n).

Findings

The results showed that smart sustainable city could leverage blockchain technology in several areas such as governance, mobility, asset, utility, healthcare and logistics. Blockchain technology could also aid smart sustainable city in achieving social, environmental and economic sustainability.

Originality/value

This study proposes a smart sustainable city with blockchain technology framework: guiding city planners and policymakers by deploying blockchain that supports technology within smart sustainable city framework. This facilitates the digital transformation of a city towards smart and sustainable through the use of blockchain.

Details

Smart and Sustainable Built Environment, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6099

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 April 2018

Nipuni Nilakshini Wimalasena and Sachie Gunatilake

Tendering is a process undertaken to obtain offers from interested contractors to carry out specific packages of construction work. Presently, most construction stakeholders in…

1284

Abstract

Purpose

Tendering is a process undertaken to obtain offers from interested contractors to carry out specific packages of construction work. Presently, most construction stakeholders in developing countries use a paper-based tendering method, which is time-consuming, costly and labour-intensive. It may be argued that considering increased calls towards efficiency improvements in the construction industry, adopting e-tendering can bring about several benefits by allowing electronic exchange of information and avoiding the errors of traditional tendering. However, the question of readiness of construction stakeholders to embrace this change remains. The aim of this study is to investigate the readiness of Sri Lankan construction contractors and consultants (who are the two key parties involved in the tendering process) to adopt e-tendering.

Design/methodology/approach

A mixed-methods research approach was used to achieve the aim. Initially, a literature review was used to compare typical conventional and e-tendering processes. Subsequently, a questionnaire survey was conducted to identify the current level of usage of e-tendering and to investigate the readiness levels of consultants and contractors to implement e-tendering. Finally, seven expert interviews were conducted to propose suitable solutions to achieve a successful e-tendering implementation.

Findings

The analysed data revealed that both consultants and contractors used electronic media in the tendering process but they were still not ready for complete e-tendering implementation. However, consultants were more hesitant than contractors. The main barrier that limited e-tendering implementation was the lack of legal rules to cover e-tendering.

Originality/value

E-tendering implementation should be initiated from the government sector. Therefore, it is recommended to update the procurement guideline and required legal policies to enrich the current usage level of e-tendering among construction stakeholders.

Details

Construction Innovation, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-4175

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 2000