Search results

1 – 10 of over 57000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 2 April 2019

Ruchini Senarath Jayasinghe, Raufdeen Rameezdeen and Nicholas Chileshe

The purpose of this paper is to explore the synergies between post-end-of-life of building (PEoLB) concepts and operations to achieve sustainability.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the synergies between post-end-of-life of building (PEoLB) concepts and operations to achieve sustainability.

Design/methodology/approach

A systematic literature review (SLR) was conducted using 65 articles published between 2006 and 2017, and it has been subjected to descriptive and thematic analysis.

Findings

The descriptive analysis revealed that the majority of the articles were about (60 per cent) PEoLB operations, followed by (23 per cent) PEoLB concepts. Only 17 per cent of the articles have dealt with PEoLB-related strategic approaches. The thematic analysis elaborated on the literature development; interrelationships between PEoLB concepts and operations; impediments of introducing sustainability on these operations, remedial measures and information-based strategic approaches to achieve sustainability. Based on the findings, a conceptual framework for sustainable PEoLB operations is proposed. Furthermore, four areas of potential future research are discussed.

Research limitations/implications

This study presents a future research agenda including best practices to plan PEoLB operations and the development of optimisation models, risk management and information-based strategic approaches.

Practical implications

The proposed conceptual research framework triggers and nurtures potential pathways to introduce sustainable PEoLB operations under sound information flow. This could create a basis for future empirical studies in filling the identified gaps in literature. The framework could also assist practitioners in mitigating risks associated with transportation, storing and contamination of salvaged materials through enhanced information flow. In addition, the framework provides some managerial guidance to organisations seeking ways of establishing sustainability during reverse logistics (RL) operations.

Originality/value

This paper presents an SLR of an emerging area of research that encapsulates closed-loop supply chain through sustainable RL operations. The study highlights the interrelationships between PEoLB concepts and operations. It develops a robust approach to effectively manage the PEoLB operations underpinned by a sound information flow to facilitate sustainability.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 26 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 24 August 2018

Farshid Baniassadi, Amin Alvanchi and Ali Mostafavi

Safety and productivity are key concerns in the construction projects. While safety looks to the construction workers need to work in a safe environment, productivity…

Abstract

Purpose

Safety and productivity are key concerns in the construction projects. While safety looks to the construction workers need to work in a safe environment, productivity affects the project’s profitability and is of a paramount importance from the project owner’s view. The different perspective to the safety and productivity from these two major players in construction projects poses a potential for the conflict between the two. This problem can be fundamentally addressed by methods concurrently improving project safety and productivity. The paper aims to discuss this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

To this aim, a discrete event simulation (DES) based framework applicable was proposed for complex and hazardous operations. The utility of the framework was tested using a case study of an eight-story residential building in the north-east part of Tehran, Iran. The excavation and stabilization operation was identified as the most hazardous and critical operation in this case. The framework could improve safety and productivity of this operation by 38 and 4 percent, respectively.

Findings

This framework is a complement to the conventional construction project safety and productivity planning methods. Its main application is in complex and hazardous construction operations.

Originality/value

For the first time, a comprehensive framework for concurrently improving safety and productivity of an entire project was proposed in this research. DES was used as the main modeling tool in the framework to provide an ex-ante evaluation foundation applicable to a wide range of construction projects.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 25 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 9 June 2021

Alhusain Taher, Faridaddin Vahdatikhaki and Amin Hammad

This study proposes a framework for Earthwork Ontology (EW-Onto) to support and enhance data exchange in the project and the efficient decision-making in the planning and…

Abstract

Purpose

This study proposes a framework for Earthwork Ontology (EW-Onto) to support and enhance data exchange in the project and the efficient decision-making in the planning and execution phases.

Design/methodology/approach

The development of EW-Onto started from defining the concepts and building taxonomies for earthwork operations and equipment following the METHONTOLOGY approach. In addition, several rules have been extracted from safety codes and implemented as SWRL rules. The ontology has been implemented using Protégé. The consistency of EW-Onto has been checked and it has been evaluated using a survey.

Findings

The assessment of EW-Onto by experts indicates an adequate level of consensus with the framework, as an initial step for explicit knowledge exchanges within the earthwork domain.

Practical implications

The use of an ontology within the earthwork domain can help: (1) link and identify the relationships between concepts, define earthwork semantics, and classify knowledge in a hierarchical way accepted by experts and end-users; (2) facilitate the management of earthwork operations and simplify information exchange and interoperability between currently fragmented systems; and (3) increase the stakeholders' knowledge of earthwork operations through the provision of the information, which is structured in the context of robust knowledge.

Originality/value

This paper proposes a framework for Earthwork Ontology (EW-Onto) to support and enhance data exchange in the project and the efficient decision-making in the planning and execution phases. EW-Onto represents the semantic values of the entities and the relationships, which are identified and formalized based on the basic definitions available in the literature and outlined by experts.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 April 2001

K.F. Pun, I.K. Hui and W.K. Lee

The increasing consciousness of environmental protection has fostered the development of environmental management systems (EMS). ISO 14001 is an international standard…

Downloads
2437

Abstract

The increasing consciousness of environmental protection has fostered the development of environmental management systems (EMS). ISO 14001 is an international standard that provides guidance for the establishment and monitoring of EMS implementation. Investigates the development of environmentally‐friendly construction operations based on a recent study in Hong Kong. Contributes to identifying the elements and processes of EMS implementation, and explaining the procedural guideline of a seven‐step EMS approach in managing construction practice. Incorporating the compliance requirements of ISO 14001, the approach addresses the policy, the implementation and monitoring, and continuous improvement of construction operations. The tangible and intangible benefits of the approach are also discussed with reference to the experiences of the Housing Department in Hong Kong. The approach may also be useful for construction practitioners to manage the EMS processes and assess their environmental performance towards continuous improvement.

Details

The TQM Magazine, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-478X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 February 1998

EDIZ ALKOC and FUAT ERBATUR

Computer simulation in construction planning has been the subject of research for the last few decades. The present paper describes simulation models geared toward…

Abstract

Computer simulation in construction planning has been the subject of research for the last few decades. The present paper describes simulation models geared toward improving the productivity of concreting operations. It is primarily concerned with a study of the sensitivity of concreting operations to a set of possible resource combinations. Thirteen models are examined by the two well‐known methods of concreting: (1) crane and bucket; and (2) the pump. Concreting into slabs, beams and columns are considered. The simulation software Micro‐CYCLONE is used for the actual generation of models. Sensitivity parameters considered in resource combinations include the number of truck‐mixers, buckets and labourers in concrete placing crews. The simulation models developed are compared and the results are discussed. The results enable planners to realize how the resource quantities and capacities in one cycle affect the ones in another period for cyclic operations like concreting. It can be concluded that the maximum number of resources, the interaction of work crews caused by work space limitations and the interaction of equipment because of sharing with other activities of the project may bring limitations.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 1998

EDIZ ALKOC and FUAT ERBATUR

The present paper reports on the development of SITE EXPERT: a prototype knowledge‐based expert system. It is an advisory system. SITE EXPERT is intended to be used for…

Abstract

The present paper reports on the development of SITE EXPERT: a prototype knowledge‐based expert system. It is an advisory system. SITE EXPERT is intended to be used for productivity improvement in construction and provides advice on: (1) the productivity of three basic operations of construction, i.e. pouring and placing of concrete, erection and removal of formwork, and fixing reinforcement; and (2) human resources and site layout as productivity factors. The system uses information from construction experts, text books, data recorded at construction sites and the engineer's own knowledge, as well as knowledge obtained by running simulation models. In the present paper, the development, operation and evaluation of the prototype system is described. The results of this prototype system development demonstrate that artificial intelligence methodologies provide powerful facilities for capturing information about construction processes and advising the practitioners of construction on productivity improvement within a computer format close to human reasoning.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 5 February 2020

Teresa Beste

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the effect of a systematic commissioning process on project management performance of construction projects, expressed as cost…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the effect of a systematic commissioning process on project management performance of construction projects, expressed as cost, time, quality and customer satisfaction. The building commissioner in focus uses the term systematic completion (SC), defining it as a structured process, throughout the whole project assuring the fulfillment of functional requirements in the building.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative single case study was used to analyze the effect of a SC process by one Norwegian building commissioner in the public sector, exemplified with four projects. The analysis was conducted by studying project documents and conducting interviews.

Findings

SC has a positive effect on the performance of a construction project, enabling completion on cost, schedule and with fewer defects at handover. Involving facility management assures mutual learning, trained operations personnel and potentially lower costs of operations because of fewer corrections and optimized systems. Higher efforts and resource use in the early phases of the project and in testing are largely offset by the generated benefits.

Research limitations/implications

This case study is limited to the building commissioner’s perspective in four projects. The design team’s, the contractor’s and the client’s perspectives are not represented in the study. Only one of the projects is completed, which limits the ability to draw quantitative conclusions.

Originality/value

Existing studies focus on the technical aspect of SC. The present study provides valuable insights into the effect of SC on project management performance, especially on its implications for the takeover of the building by operations.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 18 December 2018

Fatih Cavdur, Betul Yagmahan, Ece Oguzcan, Nazli Arslan and Nurbanu Sahan

The purpose of this paper is to present a methodology for using simulation models together with value stream mapping (VSM) for designing lean service systems and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present a methodology for using simulation models together with value stream mapping (VSM) for designing lean service systems and illustrate it with a case study.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors propose a methodology combining simulation and VSM. Simulation models for both current and future states are developed to validate the results of the corresponding maps of current and future states, respectively.

Findings

The results illustrate the advantages of the suggested design represented by the future state map. Additionally, using simulation models together with VSM for validating current and future states also allows decision makers to perform comprehensive analyses on the system and draw statistical conclusions.

Originality/value

Although some lean applications in educational services exist in previous studies, according to the best of the authors’ knowledge, this study is the first one combining VSM and simulation for the implementation of the lean concepts in the construction and technical services of a public university.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 25 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 16 April 2018

Roberta Pellegrino and Nicola Costantino

The purpose of this paper is to focus on productivity as it unfolds during the execution of a particular task, i.e., reinforced concrete operations. The main aim is…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to focus on productivity as it unfolds during the execution of a particular task, i.e., reinforced concrete operations. The main aim is understanding whether the learning effect explaining the improvement of productivity in subsequent cycles of a given repetitive construction process is mainly attributable to a pure worker learning (independent on the specific site) or to the experience developed by the crew on the site conditions.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conduct a research that empirically investigates and compares the change in productivity data of a single worker during his/her working life and that of a crew involved in specific repetitive work, such as the concreting activities of a multi-storey building.

Findings

The findings suggest differentiating between productivity gain as a result of the learning effect of the individual worker throughout his/her working life (which is independent of the specific project and site) and that of a crew composed by more workers which repeat reinforced concrete operations in a given specific project.

Research limitations/implications

Despite the great attention reserved to learning in construction, few researchers discuss on the real applicability of the learning curve (LC) theory in the construction industry. The authors contribute to this literature by empirically investigating the contributions that the learning effect of the individual worker and that of a crew repeating a given task (i.e. reinforced concrete operations) in a given project have on the productivity improvement for subsequent cycles of the repetitive construction process.

Practical implications

The findings of this study have important managerial implications. The shape of the LC of the individual worker implies that learning increases relatively slowly in his/her working life (particularly after one to two years), while the effects of the crew experience are immediately significant in a time range of few weeks. This means that a single “one-off” multi-storey building project will show in the first storey the “historical,” individual productivity of the individual workers (i.e. not going to vary significantly in the next few weeks). The productivity improvement in the further storeys will only depend on the project-specific (and collective, for the crew) “learning” due, for example, to better coordination or to other issues that are progressively solved moving from the first storey to the following ones. So, the project-specific LC increases in a faster way than the individual one, and the overall productivity can be improved by accelerating the project-specific learning rate with more accurate project-specific design and management.

Originality/value

This paper enhances the understanding of the contributions that the learning effect of the individual worker and that of a crew repeating a given task (i.e. reinforced concrete operations) in a given project have on the productivity improvement for subsequent cycles of the repetitive construction process. This will contribute to improve the planning and control of site work activities, avoiding time and money wastefulness.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 25 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 5 October 2012

Heng Li, Neo K.Y. Chan and Martin Skitmore

Rehearsing practical site operations is without doubt one of the most effective methods for minimising planning mistakes, because of the learning that takes place during…

Abstract

Purpose

Rehearsing practical site operations is without doubt one of the most effective methods for minimising planning mistakes, because of the learning that takes place during the rehearsal activity. However, real rehearsal is not a practical solution for on‐site construction activities, as it not only involves a considerable amount of cost but can also have adverse environmental implications. One approach to overcoming this is by the use of virtual rehearsals. The purpose of this paper is to investigate an approach to simulation of the motion of cranes in order to test the feasibility of associated construction sequencing and generate construction schedules for review and visualisation.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper describes a system involving two technologies, virtual prototyping (VP) and four‐dimensional (4D) simulation, to assist construction planners in testing the sequence of construction activities when mobile cranes are involved. The system consists of five modules, comprising input, database, equipment, process and output, and is capable of detecting potential collisions. A real‐world trial is described in which the system was tested and validated.

Findings

Feedback from the planners involved in the trial indicated that they found the system to be useful in its present form and that they would welcome its further development into a fully automated platform for validating construction sequencing decisions.

Research limitations/implications

The tool has the potential to provide a cost‐effective means of improving construction planning. However, it is limited at present to the specific case of crane movement under special consideration.

Originality/value

This paper presents a large‐scale, real life case of applying VP technology in planning construction processes and activities.

Details

Construction Innovation, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-4175

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 57000