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Case study
Publication date: 1 December 2007

Herbert Sherman and Gina Vega

This is the fourth in a series of articles about case research, writing, teaching, and reviewing. In this article, the protagonist, Prof. Moore, consults experienced case…

Abstract

This is the fourth in a series of articles about case research, writing, teaching, and reviewing. In this article, the protagonist, Prof. Moore, consults experienced case teachers and learns many different approaches to use in the classroom. The article is written as if it were a case; it is fictitious.

Details

The CASE Journal, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 1544-9106

Book part
Publication date: 30 July 2012

Kevin Love

Purpose – To develop an alternate metaethical framework based upon a specific modality of difference.Methodology/approach – A radicalisation of Moore's naturalistic…

Abstract

Purpose – To develop an alternate metaethical framework based upon a specific modality of difference.

Methodology/approach – A radicalisation of Moore's naturalistic fallacy and the application of the open question argument within the broader context of the continental tradition allow one to direct the ethical question away from non-naturalism and towards a speculative ethics.

Findings – Suggesting an ethical modality irreducible to ontological description or political prescription, the chapter argues for a metaethics of ‘exhortation’.

Originality/value of chapter – The chapter opens a new space for thinking ethics, and further encourages the continuing rapprochement between continental and analytical traditions in philosophy.

Practical implications – Questions of practical ethics will find new modes of engagement and expression in the context of a hortative metaethics.

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Ethics in Social Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-878-6

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2004

Dorothy Perrin Moore

The Center for Women’s Business Research estimates women are now the majority owners in 6.7 million privately held businesses in the United States and equal owners in…

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Abstract

The Center for Women’s Business Research estimates women are now the majority owners in 6.7 million privately held businesses in the United States and equal owners in another 4.0 million firms. When part owners in multiple businesses are included the female ownership total climbs to an estimated 15.6 million businesses. Women majority owners account for nearly half (48 per cent) of the privately‐held firms in the United States. Their businesses generate $2.46 trillion in sales. They employ 19.1 million people and spend an estimated $492 billion on salaries and $54 billion on employee benefits. The number of women‐owned firms increases at twice the rate of all new firms (14 per cent versus 7 per cent) and the number of employees nearly as fast (30 per cent versus 18 per cent). Women owners are rapidly moving into all industries, with the fastest growth percentages in the fields of construction (30 per cent), transportation, communications and public utilities (28 per cent) and agricultural services (24 per cent). Worldwide, with women entrepreneurs in under developed countries leading the way, women‐owned firms now comprise between one‐fourth and one‐third of all businesses. Given the numbers, it would be almost impossible to overestimate the impact of women owned businesses in today’s global economy.

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Equal Opportunities International, vol. 23 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1998

Anghel N. Rugina

The economic science is again in a crisis and a new solution prolegomena to any future study in economics, finance and other social sciences has just been published by the…

Abstract

The economic science is again in a crisis and a new solution prolegomena to any future study in economics, finance and other social sciences has just been published by the International Institute of Social Economics in care of the MCB University Press in England. The roots of the major financial and economic problems of our time lie in an open conflict between theory and practice. In the 1930s and before the conflict was between classical theory and given realities. In the 1990s the conflict appears between the now prevailing modern, Keynesian theory and the actual realities. In addition during the twentieth century a great argument developed between the two schools of thought, argument which is not yet settled. In one sentence, the prolegomena tried and was successful to solve the conflict between theory and practice and the big doctrinal dispute of the twentieth century. It was a struggle of research and observation over half a century between 1947 and 1997.

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International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 25 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

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Book part
Publication date: 9 December 2003

Leo Zaibert

The justification of punishment is an age-old debate which continues unresolved. In late twentieth century several attempts were made to reconcile the two opposing…

Abstract

The justification of punishment is an age-old debate which continues unresolved. In late twentieth century several attempts were made to reconcile the two opposing justifications: retributivism and consequentialism. But these attempts focused narrowly on merely one manifestation of punishment, i.e.: criminal punishment carried out by the state. To the extent that these mixed justifications are successful, they relate to only one (undoubtedly important) manifestation of punishment. But clearly punishment can occur in many different institutional contexts, and the institutions in each context vary dramatically in complexity and relevance. I recommend analyzing punishment in its manifold manifestations.

Details

Punishment, Politics and Culture
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-072-2

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2011

Maria Eugenia Perez, Dan Padgett and Willem Burgers

The purpose of this paper is to assess the role that elapsed time and culture may play in affecting intergenerational influence (IGI) on brand preference. The results of…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess the role that elapsed time and culture may play in affecting intergenerational influence (IGI) on brand preference. The results of an empirical study conducted in Mexico reveal that coincidence in family life‐cycle stage emerges as an important factor in determining IGI strength.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 600 questionnaires were collected from 300 dyads of mothers/daughters. This research extends Moore et al.'s basic methodology and findings to the Mexican context by including daughters at different stages of their family life cycle covering a time frame of up to 15 years out of the parents' household.

Findings

The findings support results from previous research conducted in the USA, signaling IGI as influencing brand preferences. However, the results diverge by demonstrating that in certain cultural contexts (e.g. Mexico), coincidence in family life‐cycle may have a stronger influence on IGI than the amount of elapsed time not living with parents.

Research limitations/implications

Understanding how IGI evolves in different cultural contexts may be applicable in the design of product and communication strategies leading to brand preference.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the literature by providing knowledge about the factors affecting consumers' brand preferences in Mexico, a country sharing cultural values with an important number of nations (including Latin America) where research conducted on these issues is scarce and where effective brand strategies need to be developed.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

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Article
Publication date: 6 February 2018

Hepu Deng, Kanishka Karunasena and Wei Xu

The purpose of this paper is to propose and validate a public value-based framework for evaluating the performance of electronic government (e-government), leading to the…

1970

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to propose and validate a public value-based framework for evaluating the performance of electronic government (e-government), leading to the identification of the critical factors in creating public value through e-government in developing countries.

Design/methodology/approach

A comprehensive review of the related literatures is conducted for developing a public value-based framework. A survey of e-government users is conducted, and the survey data are analysed using structural equation modelling.

Findings

This study shows that information quality, e-services functionalities, user orientation, efficiency and openness of public organisations, equity, citizens’ self-development, trust, and environmental sustainability are the critical public values of e-government in developing countries. It reveals that the use of the public value concept is effective in evaluating the performance of e-government in developing countries.

Practical implications

This study provides a comprehensive investigation of the e-government performance for better understanding the value of e-government in developing countries. The findings can guide the development of e-government in developing countries.

Originality/value

This is the first study in testing and validating a public value-based framework for evaluating the performance of e-government in developing countries. It demonstrates how the concept of public value can be adopted for evaluating the performance of e-government.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 28 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2006

Eddie C.M. Hui

Mobility has wide‐range impacts on the financial management of property issues, such as consumption and investment. In the literature of residential mobility, household…

Abstract

Mobility has wide‐range impacts on the financial management of property issues, such as consumption and investment. In the literature of residential mobility, household life cycle is widely acknowledged as an important concept. An array of household demographic factors such as age has been repeatedly found to be significant in influencing mobility. Many previous researches offer few verifi able hypotheses or propositions and their results are conflicting. Some of them also suffer methodological inadequacies. This paper is an attempt to rectify this situation. There are two important contributions by the current research. One is a methodology that employs multivariate methods, which fills the gap of previous research. The second contribution is the large census dataset of Hong Kong which is rare in previous studies. The research is conducted under the framework of life cycle models with emphasis on economic and demographic variables of households. Demographic determinants are found to be more important in explaining population mobility among rental households while economic factors are more pertinent for owners. This may be explained by the different strategies adopted by renters and owners in satisfying their housing needs. Renters are envisaged to base their mobility decisions more on demographic factors. Owners, on the other hand, tend to view home buying as an investment as well and hence put more emphasis on economic factors. It is hoped that this research can shed more light on the topic of residential mobility by drawing on the experience of a large population residing in a small place, Hong Kong

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Journal of Financial Management of Property and Construction, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-4387

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Content available
Book part
Publication date: 2 June 2022

Abstract

Details

African American Young Girls and Women in PreK12 Schools and Beyond
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-532-0

Book part
Publication date: 21 August 2017

Rachel E. Friedensen and Ezekiel Kimball

Disability is a multivalent, fluid concept that encompasses a broad set of phenomena that shape the experiences of individuals as they interact with others; social systems…

Abstract

Disability is a multivalent, fluid concept that encompasses a broad set of phenomena that shape the experiences of individuals as they interact with others; social systems and processes; and legal structures. A disability identity also encompasses a range of different diagnoses and levels of visibility, which serve to influence whether others perceive a person to have a disability. Recognizing the multivalent nature of disability-as-identity makes it possible to understand more fully the experiences of students with disabilities in higher education institutions. Since there is no single theoretical framework that can account for the multivalent nature of disability identity, we utilize the concept of theoretical borderlands (Anzaldúa, 1987) – spaces where ideas come into conflict with one another – to bring crip theory (Kafer, 2013; McRuer, 2006) and critical queer theory (Muñoz, 1999; Wilchins, 2014) into conversation with each other to explore disability identity. We explore the medical, legal, diagnostic, environmental, social, and cultural dimensions of disability identity, concluding with a call to consider the intersectional nature of disability. We also consider the implications for higher education research and practice.

Details

Theory and Method in Higher Education Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-222-2

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