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Article
Publication date: 5 June 2019

Hongjun Xing, Kerui Xia, Liang Ding, Haibo Gao, Guangjun Liu and Zongquan Deng

The purpose of this paper is to enable autonomous door-opening with unknown geometrical constraints. Door-opening is a common action needed for mobile manipulators to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to enable autonomous door-opening with unknown geometrical constraints. Door-opening is a common action needed for mobile manipulators to perform rescue operation. However, it remains difficult for them to handle it in real rescue environments. The major difficulties of rescue manipulation involve contradiction between unknown geometrical constraints and limited sensors because of extreme physical constraints.

Design/methodology/approach

A method for estimating the unknown door geometrical parameters using coordinate transformation of the end-effector with visual teleoperation assists is proposed. A trajectory planning algorithm is developed using geometrical parameters from the proposed method.

Findings

The relevant experiments are also conducted using a manipulator suited to extreme physical constraints to open a real door with a locked latch and unknown geometrical parameters, which demonstrates the validity and efficiency of the proposed approach.

Originality/value

This is a novel method for estimating the unknown door geometrical parameters with coordinate transformation of the end-effector through visual teleoperation assists.

Details

Assembly Automation, vol. 39 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-5154

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 16 October 2017

Jiajun Li, Jianguo Tao, Liang Ding, Haibo Gao, Zongquan Deng, Yang Luo and Zhandong Li

The purpose of this paper is to extend the usage of stroke gestures in manipulation tasks to make the interaction between human and robot more efficient.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to extend the usage of stroke gestures in manipulation tasks to make the interaction between human and robot more efficient.

Design/methodology/approach

In this paper, a set of stroke gestures is designed for typical manipulation tasks. A gesture recognition and parameter extraction system is proposed to exploit the information in stroke gestures drawn by the users.

Findings

The results show that the designed gesture recognition subsystem can reach a recognition accuracy of 99.00 per cent. The parameter extraction subsystem can successfully extract parameters needed for typical manipulation tasks with a success rate about 86.30 per cent. The system shows an acceptable performance in the experiments.

Practical implications

Using stroke gesture in manipulation tasks can make the transmission of human intentions to the robots more efficient. The proposed gesture recognition subsystem is based on convolutional neural network which is robust to different input. The parameter extraction subsystem can extract the spatial information encoded in stroke gestures.

Originality/value

The author designs stroke gestures for manipulation tasks which is an extension of the usage of stroke gestures. The proposed gesture recognition and parameter extraction system can make use of stroke gestures to get the type of the task and important parameters for the task simultaneously.

Details

Industrial Robot: An International Journal, vol. 44 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-991X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 25 May 2012

Kirstin Steele

The purpose of the paper is to share a perspective new to the author, regarding how acquisitions problems in the library grow and present themselves.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the paper is to share a perspective new to the author, regarding how acquisitions problems in the library grow and present themselves.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper considers possible ways to prevent problems and minimize time spent solving them.

Findings

Filing, establishing standard operating procedures, and delegating problems might eliminate or prevent some problems, but unexpected staff shortages and intermittent or unusual problems will continue to occur.

Originality/value

It is hoped that the realization that not every situation can be anticipated will help faculty and staff be more patient with their colleagues in the library.

Details

The Bottom Line, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0888-045X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 9 June 2021

Chuang Cheng, Hui Zhang, Hui Peng, Zhiqian Zhou, Bailiang Chen, Zhiwen Zeng and Huimin Lu

When the mobile manipulator is traveling on an unconstructed terrain, the external disturbance is generated. The load on the end of the mobile manipulator will be affected…

Abstract

Purpose

When the mobile manipulator is traveling on an unconstructed terrain, the external disturbance is generated. The load on the end of the mobile manipulator will be affected strictly by the disturbance. The purpose of this paper is to reject the disturbance and keep the end effector in a stable pose all the time, a control method is proposed for the onboard manipulator.

Design/methodology/approach

In this paper, the kinematics and dynamics models of the end pose stability control system for the tracked robot are built. Through the guidance of this model information, the control framework based on active disturbance rejection control (ADRC) is designed, which keeps the attitude of the end of the manipulator stable in the pitch, roll and yaw direction. Meanwhile, the control algorithm is operated with cloud computing because the research object, the rescue robot, aims to be lightweight and execute work with remote manipulation.

Findings

The challenging simulation experiments demonstrate that the methodology can achieve valid stability control performance in the challenging terrain road in terms of robustness and real-time.

Originality/value

This research facilitates the stable posture control of the end-effector of the mobile manipulator and maintains it in a suitable stable operating environment. The entire system can normally work even in dynamic disturbance scenarios and uncertain nonlinear modeling. Furthermore, an example is given to guide the parameter tuning of ADRC by using model information and estimate the unknown internal modeling uncertainty, which is difficult to be modeled or identified.

Details

Assembly Automation, vol. 41 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-5154

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2006

David J. Burns and Lewis Neisner

To examine the relative roles played by cognition and emotion in the development of customer satisfaction in a retail setting.

Abstract

Purpose

To examine the relative roles played by cognition and emotion in the development of customer satisfaction in a retail setting.

Design/methodology/approach

An experimental design was employed. Study participants were exposed one of two expectation scenarios depicting past experience with an unnamed retail store, with one developed to build high expectations and one developed to create low expectations. Study participants were then exposed to one of two performance scenarios depicting a new experience with the unnamed retail store, with one depicting a successful pleasurable experience and one depicting a performance failure. Participants were also asked to complete scales measuring their cognitive evaluation of the perceived performance and their emotional reaction to the perceived performance.

Findings

Both cognitive evaluation and emotional reaction were found to explain the level of satisfaction experienced in a retail setting. As opposed to a service setting, however, cognitive evaluation was found to be more important than emotional reaction in explaining customer satisfaction. When the individual treatment levels were examined, anger/delight and shame were observed to be significant only for the third treatment level (high expectations/poor performance).

Practical implications

The findings suggest that retailers whose customers possess high expectations will need to place explicit attention on their customers' emotions. If a performance is deemed as negative, not only will the negative performance affect level of satisfaction, but also the negative emotions associated with the poor performance will also likely affect level of satisfaction.

Originality/value

The paper examines the role of emotion in developing customer satisfaction in a retail setting.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 34 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 14 June 2021

Chuande Liu, Bingtuan Gao, Chuang Yu and Adriana Tapus

Many work conditions require manipulators to open cabinet doors and then gain access to the desired workspace. However, after opening, the unlocked doors can easily close…

Abstract

Purpose

Many work conditions require manipulators to open cabinet doors and then gain access to the desired workspace. However, after opening, the unlocked doors can easily close, interrupt a task and potentially break the operating end-effectors. This paper aims to address a manipulator's behavior planning problem for responding to a dynamic workspace released by door opening.

Design/methodology/approach

A dynamic model of the restricted workspace released by an unlocked door is established. As a whole system to treat, the interactions between the workspace and robot are analyzed by using a partially observable Markov decision process. A self-protective policy decision executed as a belief tree is proposed. To respond to the policy, this study has designed three types of actions: stay on guard in the workspace, using an elbow joint to defense the door and linear escape out of the workspace for self-protection by observing collision risk levels to trigger them. Finally, this study proposes self-protective motion controllers based on risk time optimization to act to the planned actions.

Findings

The elbow defense could balance robotic safety and work efficiency by interrupting the end-effector's work and using the elbow joint to prevent the door-closing in an active collision way. Compared with the stay and escape action, the advantage of the elbow defense is having a predictable performance to quick callback the interrupted work after the risk was relieved.

Originality/value

This work provides guidance for the safe operation of a class of robot operations and the upgrade of motion planning.

Details

Industrial Robot: the international journal of robotics research and application, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-991X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2001

Ihsan Faraj

In features based design systems that are underpinned by solid models, buildings are designed by applying features to the design domain. A feature may be translated and/or…

Abstract

In features based design systems that are underpinned by solid models, buildings are designed by applying features to the design domain. A feature may be translated and/or rotated in order to position it in the desired place. Contradiction between the applied features and resulting features may occur due to the features interaction, wrong positioning, or inadequate parameters supplied by the user during the product definition. Moreover, the application of other features may cause some features to degenerate to further features. Therefore, verification of the resulting features must be performed against the applied features to establish whether the resulting features conform to the underlying geometry. Current feature‐based design systems employ a mechanism of tagging feature labels onto geometry. This approach does not guarantee the geometric correctness of the resultant feature and knowledge of the topology of the resulting feature and a geometric analysis is necessary to correctly identify the validity of the resultant feature. The research reported in this paper proposes an alternative approach which uses a product model that permits all geometrical and technological information associated with the design and construction stages to be represented. Individual features can be extracted from the product model and analysed to determine their accessibility. Methods which use the product description and other construction data to determine feature validity, accessibility and machinability are used. Each volumetric feature corresponds to a solid that can be added by one or more construction process or removed by one or more machining operations; as a consequence of applying volumetric features, surface features are generated. These surface features provide enough information to enable the accessibility, and machinability of the individual features to be determined and establish the possible routes in which the feature can be accessed if any.

Details

Construction Innovation, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-4175

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2003

Ihsan Faraj

This paper discusses an approach for constructing product models in terms of features. In particular, the work focused on features verification and their accessibility…

Abstract

This paper discusses an approach for constructing product models in terms of features. In particular, the work focused on features verification and their accessibility using the solid model representation of the design. The research was motivated by the inadequacy of the current geometric modellers to perform verification and accessibility analyses, resulting in possible contradictions between the intended and the resultant features. Consequently, the wrong data are passed to the applications that use the data. The paper describes an alternative approach that considers the geometry, topology of the design and other construction and engineering information of the product rather than the simplistic approach, which is implemented in many geometric modellers; and is based on tagging feature labels on geometry. Individual features are extracted from the product model, where all the information about the product is held, for analyses. Each volumetric feature corresponds to a solid. As a consequence of applying volumetric features to the design model, surface features are generated. These surface features provide enough information to enable the validity and accessibility of the individual features to be determined and establish the possible routes in which the feature can be accessed, if any. The algorithms that are used to determine the validity and accessibility of features will be discussed.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 6 July 2020

Ehsan Mousavi, Vivek Sharma, Dhaval Gajjar and Shervin Shoai Naini

The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of the control cubes for dust control in health-care facilities. Research shows that more than 80% of pathogenic…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness of the control cubes for dust control in health-care facilities. Research shows that more than 80% of pathogenic agents in hospitals are spread into the air, where they either remain airborne or deposit on the surface. At the same time, renovation and repair activities, including regular maintenance, are a necessity in active health-care facilities and a multitude of studies have documented their impact on indoor air quality. The dust that is generated by construction activities may potentially carry pathogenic agents, varying from coarse particles (≤10 µm, PM10) to fine particles (≤2.5 µm, PM2.5), including airborne bacteria, and fungal spores linked to high patient mortality in immune-compromised patients.

Design/methodology/approach

This study measures the impact and effectiveness of one such preventative measure, namely, the control cube (CC), on air quality during renovation and repair. CC is a temporary structure, typically made from stainless steel, around the local repair zone to minimize the spread of dust and potential microorganisms. The current paper presents a comparative analysis to identify the effectiveness of a CC equipped with the high-efficiency particulate filtration (HEPA) filter in a hospital setting by simulating construction renovation and repair work.

Findings

A baseline was established to measure the effectiveness of CCs and the impact of negative pressure on the indoor air quality in a hospital during simulated renovation work. Results showed that CCs are very effective in minimizing the spread of dust due to construction activities in the hospital. However, it is imperative to ensure that the air inside the CC is cleaned via filtration.

Originality/value

CCs are very effective, and this paper investigates the best approach for facility managers to implement this strategy.

Details

Journal of Facilities Management , vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-5967

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 6 July 2012

Phil Banfill, Sophie Simpson, Victoria Haines and Becky Mallaband

Mechanical ventilation with heat recovery (MVHR) is increasingly being promoted in the UK as a means of reducing the CO2 emissions from dwellings, and installers report…

Abstract

Purpose

Mechanical ventilation with heat recovery (MVHR) is increasingly being promoted in the UK as a means of reducing the CO2 emissions from dwellings, and installers report growing activity in the retrofit market. However, the airtightness of a dwelling is a crucially important factor governing the achievement of CO2 reductions, and the purpose of this paper is to understand the technical implications of airtightness levels in an experimental dwelling, purpose built to typical 1930s standards, at the same time as gaining the users’ perspectives on airtightness and ventilation in their homes.

Design/methodology/approach

In‐depth interviews were carried out with 20 households to collect information on their retrofit and improvement strategies, attitudes to energy saving and their living practices as they impinge on ventilation. The experimental house was sealed in a series of interventions, leading to successive reductions in the air permeability as measured by a 50 Pa pressurisation test. The behaviour of a whole‐house MVHR system installed in the experimental house, was simulated using IES Virtual Environment, using a range of air permeability values corresponding to those achieved in the retrofit upgrading process.

Findings

In the house considered, air permeability must be reduced below 5 m3/m2h for MVHR to make an overall energy and CO2 saving. However, to achieve this required a level of disruption that, on the basis of the views expressed, would be unlikely to be tolerated by owners of solid wall dwellings.

Originality/value

The paper is the first to combine results from a user‐centred approach to exploring the existing practices of householders with a simulation of the energy and CO2 performance at different levels of airtightness of an experimental house in which MVHR has been installed.

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