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Article
Publication date: 9 March 2010

A.W. Ruan, Y.B. Liao, P. Li and W.C. Li

With the growing system‐on‐a‐chip (SOC) design complexity, SOC verification has become a major congestion. In this context, efficient and reliable verification environment…

Abstract

Purpose

With the growing system‐on‐a‐chip (SOC) design complexity, SOC verification has become a major congestion. In this context, efficient and reliable verification environment is requested for SOC design before it is committed to production. The purpose of this paper is to judge whether the hardware and or software (HW/SW) co‐verification environment can handle SOC verification and provide the necessary performance in terms of co‐verification speed and throughput, power and resource consumption, timing analysis, etc.

Design/methodology/approach

A finite‐impulse‐response filter is utilized as a device‐under‐test to compare pure SW simulation, Modelsim simulator in this case, and HW/SW co‐verification approaches to decide on whether the HW/SW co‐verification environment can do work or not. In addition, the performance of the HW/SW co‐verification environment is estimated based on specifications such as co‐verification speed and throughput, power and resource consumption, and timing analysis.

Findings

From experiment results, conclusions can be drawn that the more complicated SOC is, the greater the potential speedup of the co‐verification approach over SW simulation is. However, the communication between SW and HW in HW/SW co‐verification system is a major congestion, which may offset the acceleration achieved by moving large computation from the SW to the HW side.

Originality/value

Performance estimation for the HW/SW co‐verification environment has been conducted in terms of co‐verification speed and throughput, power and resource consumption, timing analysis, etc.

Details

COMPEL - The international journal for computation and mathematics in electrical and electronic engineering, vol. 29 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0332-1649

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Book part
Publication date: 6 July 2005

Jan E. Stets and Peter J. Burke

Identity control theory has long posited that there are positive emotional consequences to identity verification and negative emotional consequences to the lack of…

Abstract

Identity control theory has long posited that there are positive emotional consequences to identity verification and negative emotional consequences to the lack of identity verification. While some of the positive consequences of identity verification have been discussed, little work has been done to elaborate the variety of negative emotions that result for a discrepancy between meanings held in the identity standard and meanings perceived in the situation. This paper elaborates the nature of this discrepancy and hypothesizes the variety of negative emotions that arise depending upon the source of the discrepancy, the source of the identity standard, and the relative power and status of the actor and others in the situation. In this way, the emotional consequences of identity non-verification are shown to depend upon the context of the social structure in which the non-verification occurs.

Details

Social Identification in Groups
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-223-8

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Book part
Publication date: 9 July 2004

Jan E Stets

This research continues to advance the role of emotion in identity theory by examining how the external social structure influences internal identity processes to produce…

Abstract

This research continues to advance the role of emotion in identity theory by examining how the external social structure influences internal identity processes to produce negative emotions. According to identity control theory, negative arousal emerges when one experiences identity feedback that is non-verifying, persistent, and from a source who is familiar compared to unfamiliar to one. While other research has not definitively supported these relationships (Stets, 2003, 2005), the current research examines whether the identity theory hypotheses are conditioned upon one’s status in the social structure. Using the diffuse status characteristic of gender where the status of male is high and the status of female is low, I investigate the role of status (both as the recipient and source of non-verifying identity feedback), persistence, and familiarity in producing negative emotions. The data are based on a laboratory experiment that simulates a work situation and invokes the worker identity. Workers of high or low status are the recipients of identity non-verification that is persistent or non-persistent and that is from a familiar or unfamiliar other. Managers of high or low status and who are familiar or unfamiliar with the workers are the source of persistent or non-persistent identity non-verification. The results reveal that the status of actors both as the recipient and source of identity non-verification are significant for negative emotions, suggesting that status effects need to be incorporated into the theoretical development of emotions in identity theory.

Details

Theory and Research on Human Emotions
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-108-8

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Book part
Publication date: 20 October 2020

Brennan J. Miller and Will Kalkhoff

Purpose – This chapter explores the effects of persistent identity nonverification on the emotional, cognitive, and behavioral responses used to “reclaim” an identity…

Abstract

Purpose – This chapter explores the effects of persistent identity nonverification on the emotional, cognitive, and behavioral responses used to “reclaim” an identity within the perceptual control model of identity theory.

Methodology/Approach – We conducted a within-subjects experiment invoking the “student” identity to examine the relationship between the persistence of nonverification and emotional, cognitive, and behavioral reactions.

Findings – Contrary to identity theory, we find the effect of persistent nonverification on negative emotion and behavior change is curvilinear (rather than linear). Low persistence produced the least negative emotion, but medium and high persistence produced comparably higher levels of negative emotion. For behavior change, the relationship is curvilinear and opposite what identity theory would expect: low persistence produced the greatest (rather than least) behavior change. For cognitive reactions, we find support for identity theory: persistent nonverification has a negative (linear) effect on the perceived accuracy of feedback. We conclude that while individuals accurately perceive the degree to which identity-relevant feedback is discrepant, “too much” nonverification produces excessive negative emotion and dismissal of social feedback with little behavioral modification.

Practical Implications – Program interventions based on identity theory may focus on maximizing identity verification as a means of shaping positive identities and behaviors. Our research suggests that there may be a “goldilocks zone” where small amounts of nonverification lead to more positive outcomes.

Originality/Value of the Chapter – This chapter examines persistence of identity nonverification in connection with more or less immediate cognitive and behavioral (not just affective) responses, which has not yet been done in identity theory research.

Details

Advances in Group Processes
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-232-1

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Article
Publication date: 31 August 2020

Sohei Ito, Dominik Vymětal and Roman Šperka

The need for assuring correctness of business processes in enterprises is widely recognised in terms of business process re-engineering and improvement. Formal methods are…

Abstract

Purpose

The need for assuring correctness of business processes in enterprises is widely recognised in terms of business process re-engineering and improvement. Formal methods are a promising approach to this issue. The challenge in business process verification is to create a formal model that is well-aligned to the reality. Process mining is a well-known technique to discover a model of a process based on facts. However, no studies exist that apply it to formal verification. This study aims to propose a methodology for formal business process verification by means of process mining, and attempts to clarify the challenges and necessary technologies in this approach using a case study.

Design/methodology/approach

A trading company simulation model is used as a case study. A workflow model is discovered from an event log produced by a simulation tool and manually complemented to a formal model. Correctness requirements of both domain-dependent and domain-independent types of the model are checked by means of model-checking.

Findings

For business process verification with both domain-dependent and domain-independent correctness requirements, more advanced process mining techniques that discover data-related aspects of processes are desirable. The choice of a formal modelling language is also crucial. It depends on the correctness requirements and the characteristics of the business process.

Originality/value

Formal verification of business processes starting with creating its formal model is quite new. Furthermore, domain-dependent and domain-independent correctness properties are considered in the same framework, which is also new. This study revealed necessary technologies for this approach with process mining.

Details

Journal of Modelling in Management, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5664

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Article
Publication date: 3 July 2020

Jinyoung Min, Youngjin Yoo, Hyeyoung Hah and Heeseok Lee

Rather than viewing social network technology (SNT) as a mere tool to access a networked audience, we emphasize its role as both a means and a social actor to help verify…

Abstract

Purpose

Rather than viewing social network technology (SNT) as a mere tool to access a networked audience, we emphasize its role as both a means and a social actor to help verify people’s self-images in an online social context.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing upon self-verification theory, this study investigates a mechanism of how users are willing to use SNTs continuously through the cognitive and affective reactions on two different SNTs. Structural equation modeling was used via data collected from 320 Facebook and 313 Twitter users.

Findings

Our results demonstrated that Facebook users regard it only as a useful tool for presenting self-images, while Twitter users are likely to feel an emotional attachment to technology as a social actor when ideal self-verification is gained, and that different types of SNTs create differential contexts for self-verification.

Research limitations/implications

This study suggests a new lens to understand SNT’s role as a social actor in the self-verification process, further identifying the SNT context in which SNT takes different roles.

Practical implications

In a certain SNT usage context, users are attached to SNTs, suggesting SNT providers consider features that enable SNT users to fulfill their own self-verification motives.

Originality/value

This study explores the roles of SNTs from a self-verification perspective. Our conceptualization of technology as a self-verifying social actor can further extend existing discussions on the role of SNT in response to self-verifying needs, while also promoting the continued use of SNTs in the future.

Content available
Article
Publication date: 3 June 2019

Tae-Yeol Kim, Brad Gilbreath, Emily M. David and Sang-Pyo Kim

The purpose of this paper is to test whether self-verification striving serves as an individual difference antecedent of emotional labor and explore whether various…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to test whether self-verification striving serves as an individual difference antecedent of emotional labor and explore whether various emotional labor tactics acted as mediating mechanisms through which self-verification striving relates to employee outcomes.

Design/methodology/approach

The sample used in this paper consisted of supervisor–subordinate dyads working in six hotels in South Korea and used multi-level analyses and the Monte Carlo method to test the research hypotheses presented in this paper.

Findings

Self-verification striving was positively and directly related to job performance as well as two out of three forms of emotional labor (i.e. the expression of naturally felt emotions and deep acting). Self-verification striving also indirectly related to job satisfaction through the expression of naturally felt emotions and indirectly related to job performance through deep acting.

Practical implications

The findings of this paper suggest that organizations should consider self-verification striving as an employment selection criterion and provide training programs to help their customer service employees engage in appropriate types of emotional labor.

Originality/value

This paper is the first to explore the underlying mechanisms through which self-verification striving relates to employee outcomes. It also empirically bolsters the notion that expressing naturally felt emotions is an important means of authentic self-expression that positively contributes to job satisfaction. Further, the authors found that self-verification striving positively relates to job performance partially through deep acting. Moreover, they have shown that self-verification striving, as an individual differences variable, is an antecedent of different types of emotional labor.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 31 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2005

Oleksiy Mazhelis, Jouni Markkula and Jari Veijalainen

To report the work on the design of an integrated identity verification system architecture aimed at approaching high verification accuracy, continuous security, and…

Abstract

Purpose

To report the work on the design of an integrated identity verification system architecture aimed at approaching high verification accuracy, continuous security, and user‐friendliness.

Design/methodology/approach

The reported research corresponds to the building process in the design science research paradigm. The requirements to an identity verification system are defined and used in the selection of architecture components. Furthermore, various issues affecting the suitability of component distribution between a terminal and a remote server are considered.

Findings

In order to meet the stated requirements, in the proposed architecture static and dynamic identity verification is combined. The use of the dynamic part enables continuous and user‐friendly verification, while the static part is responsible for accurate verification. A suitable distribution of architecture components between the terminal and the remote server is proposed.

Research limitations/implications

The proposed architecture represents a specification that corresponds to the computational viewpoint of the reference model for open distributed processing. Other specifications, such as engineering or technological specifications, which are needed for successful implementation of the system, are not provided in the paper.

Practical implications

The paper provides a specification of the integrated identify verification system architecture that can be utilised during further design and subsequent implementation of the system.

Originality/value

While available approaches to identity verification in a mobile environment concentrate mainly on connectivity identity verification (employed in accessing communication services), the proposed architecture focuses on application‐level identity verification needed to access application‐level resources, remotely or locally on the terminal.

Details

Information Management & Computer Security, vol. 13 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-5227

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Article
Publication date: 19 June 2017

Jia Chen Tu, Xiao Ming Qian and Pei Huang Lou

The paper aims to propose general design rules and route plan for automated guided vehicle system (AGVS). The AGVS is applied to automated meter verification areas through…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to propose general design rules and route plan for automated guided vehicle system (AGVS). The AGVS is applied to automated meter verification areas through a case study of meter verification shop floor to verify the feasibility.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper gives an appropriate route design for AGVS and proposes an optimized strategy for designed routes and a control system to manage traffic conflict.

Findings

This case study indicates that the application of AGVS can highly improve the efficiency of manufacturing and production. Besides, a reasonable transportation plan is beneficial in making the system run smoothly and in cutting conveying time.

Practical implications

The application of AGVS integrates a variety of advanced technologies (i.e. information technology, artificial intelligence, etc.) into the electricity meter verification system, which brings great economic and social benefits via enhancing the verification efficiency and reducing the total labor costs.

Originality/value

The application proposed in the paper solves the problem that the verification almost relies on workers, labor intensity is high and work efficiency is hard to improve. Furthermore, the general rules and strategies of AGVS transportation can be applied not only to the automated electricity meter verification but also in other industrial areas.

Details

Industrial Robot: An International Journal, vol. 44 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-991X

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 24 June 2019

Pim Klamer, Vincent Gruis and Cok Bakker

Information verification is an important factor in commercial valuation practice. Valuers use their professional autonomy to decide on the level of verification required…

Abstract

Purpose

Information verification is an important factor in commercial valuation practice. Valuers use their professional autonomy to decide on the level of verification required, thereby creating an opportunity for client-related judgement bias in valuation. The purpose of this paper is to assess the manifestation of client attachment risks in information verification.

Design/methodology/approach

A case-based questionnaire was used to retrieve data from 290 commercial valuation professionals in the Netherlands, providing a 15 per cent response rate of the Dutch commercial valuation population. Descriptive and inferential statistics have been used to test research hypotheses involving relations between information verification and professional features that may indicate client attachment such as an executive job level and brokerage experience.

Findings

The results reveal that valuers acting at partner level within their organisation obtain lower scores on information verification compared to lower-ranked valuers. Also, brokerage experience correlates negatively to information verification of valuation professionals. Both findings have statistical significance.

Research limitations/implications

The results reflect valuers’ reasoning behaviour rather than actual behaviour. Replication of findings through experimental design will contribute to research validity.

Practical implications

Maintaining close client contact in a competitive environment is important for business continuity yet may foster client attachment. The associated downside risks in valuation practice call for higher awareness of (subconscious) client influence and the development of attitudinal scepticism in valuer training programmes.

Originality/value

This paper is one of the few that explore possible sources of valuer judgement bias by relating client-friendly valuer features to a key area of valuation i.e. information verification.

Details

Journal of Property Investment & Finance, vol. 37 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-578X

Keywords

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