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Article
Publication date: 24 October 2018

Kin Wai Michael Siu, Jia Xin Xiao and Yi Lin Wong

This study aims to address policy, implementation and management, the three stages of inclusive open space. It compares both the level of design and implementation of open…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to address policy, implementation and management, the three stages of inclusive open space. It compares both the level of design and implementation of open space in Beijing, Hong Kong and Taipei by following the inclusive guidelines. It also identifies recommendations for policy, implementation and management of inclusive open space and its facilities.

Design/methodology/approach

Field observations were conducted in 27 parks within three cities. In-depth interviews were conducted with a variety of participants, including visually impaired persons, government officers, representatives of non-governmental organisations, local communities and experts.

Findings

Most of the so-called inclusive environments and facilities have not been user-friendly in actual practice. The findings suggest that policies are an essential precondition; however, implementation and management must not be ignored because they ensure the effectiveness of inclusive design.

Research limitations/implications

Comprehensive and continuous studies on the proposed framework are recommended throughout the policy, implementation and management processes.

Practical implications

The findings serve as a reference and direction for taking a holistic approach to inclusive design of open space in densely populated cities.

Social implications

This study examines the levels of inclusive open space and illustrates how to provide barrier-free environments that can be used by the widest spectrum of people.

Originality/value

This study evaluates policy, implementation and management in the three cities based on 29 guidelines generated from seven principles of inclusive design. A research framework is proposed for researchers and policymakers to consider how to achieve effective inclusive open spaces.

Details

Facilities, vol. 37 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 25 July 2014

Helen Larkin, Claire Nihill and Marcia Devlin

This chapter explores a set of principles that underpin ensuring that the learning needs of all students are addressed in next generation learning spaces. With…

Abstract

This chapter explores a set of principles that underpin ensuring that the learning needs of all students are addressed in next generation learning spaces. With increasingly diverse higher education environments and populations, higher education needs to move from seeing student diversity as problematic and deficit-based, to welcoming, celebrating and recognising diversity for the contributions it makes to enhancing the experience and learning outcomes for all students. The principles of Universal Design for Learning (CAST, 2011) provide a framework for high-quality university teaching and learning, as well as guidance on the multiple methods and means by which all students can be engaged and learn in ways that best suit their individual styles and needs. An inclusive approach is important pedagogically and applies to both the physical and virtual environments and spaces inhabited by students. When the design of physical environments does not incorporate universal design principles, the result is that some students can be locked out of participating in campus or university life or, for some, the energy required to participate can be substantial. With the digital education frontier expanding at an exponential rate, there is also a need to ensure that online and virtual environments are accessible for all. This chapter draws on the relevant research and the combined experience of the authors to explore an approach to inclusive practices in higher education next generation learning spaces and beyond.

Details

The Future of Learning and Teaching in Next Generation Learning Spaces
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-986-7

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 28 May 2020

Malin Lindberg, Åsa Wikberg Nilsson, Eugenia Segerstedt, Erik Hidman, Kristina L. Nilsson, Helena Karlberg and Johanna Balogh

The purpose of this paper is to shed light on co-creative approaches for place innovation in an Arctic town, based on the relocation of Kiruna’s city center in northern…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to shed light on co-creative approaches for place innovation in an Arctic town, based on the relocation of Kiruna’s city center in northern Sweden. Three cases of co-creative innovation processes in Kiruna are investigated and compared: an R&D project about local perceptions and visions of attractive urban environments; an R&D project about norm-creative design principles for inclusive and attractive urban design; and an R&D project about cross-industrial synergies for city center attractiveness.

Design/methodology/approach

The study’s research design encompasses a comparative and participatory approach. The comparative approach implies investigation and comparison of three cases of co-creative innovation processes in Kiruna. The participatory approach implies joint development of new knowledge by researchers and local actors. The data consists of participatory observations of workshops and qualitative interviews with local actors.

Findings

The study reveals that the studied processes have harnessed the city center relocation as an opportunity to make Kiruna more attractive to residents and visitors, by using the co-creative approaches of Living Lab, Now-Wow-How and Norm-creative design. These approaches have enabled experts and local actors to jointly identify excluding patterns and norms in the relocation process and to envision inclusive and attractive (re-)configurations and (re-)conceptualizations of the future Kiruna.

Research limitations/implications

The results add to the academic strand of inclusive urban transformation, by providing insights into co-creative approaches for re-imagining an Arctic town in times of industrial and social change. New insights are provided regarding how the geographical, industrial and cultural identity of an Arctic town can be harnessed to envision new configuration, content and communication that is attractive and accessible for a diversity of residents and visitors.

Practical implications

The results highlight the potential to harness Arctic and rural characteristics in the promotion of urban attractiveness and public well-being, especially when combined with co-creative identification and transformation of excluding norms and patterns.

Originality/value

The results provide new insights into how co-creative approaches may facilitate innovative and inclusive renewal of towns and cities in the Arctic and beyond.

Details

Journal of Place Management and Development, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8335

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 26 July 2010

Sam Waller, Pat Langdon and John Clarkson

This paper summarises the ‘what’, ‘why’ and ‘how’ of inclusive design, and presents key contributions of the 2006‐2010 i‐design research consortium, the third successive…

Abstract

This paper summarises the ‘what’, ‘why’ and ‘how’ of inclusive design, and presents key contributions of the 2006‐2010 i‐design research consortium, the third successive research consortium funded by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council as part of the Extending Quality of Life initiative. Throughout 10 years of i‐design research, the overarching goals have been to provide industrial decision makers with mechanisms for understanding the significance of age‐ and capability‐related factors, and to provide the design community with the techniques and guidance required to deliver better products and services for people of all ages and abilities. In this latest period of research, the specific emphasis has been on quantifying design exclusion and enabling designers to work with users.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 February 2008

The paper aims investigate the “Inclusive Design Toolkit” developed by researchers at Cambridge University's Engineering Design Centre (EDC)..

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Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims investigate the “Inclusive Design Toolkit” developed by researchers at Cambridge University's Engineering Design Centre (EDC)..

Design/methodology/approach

The paper looks at the new and freely available ‐ “Inclusive Design Toolkit”.

Findings

The “Inclusive Design Toolkit” is intended to help UK companies to design mainstream products and/or services that are accessible to, and usable by, as many people as reasonably possible, without the need for special adaptation or specialized design. With populations aging, there is an increasingly strong business case for making the effort to design inclusive products.

Originality/value

The “Inclusive Design Toolkit” is presented which, it is hoped, will result in better products with greater user satisfaction and greater commercial success, whilst reducing product development risk.

Details

Strategic Direction, vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0258-0543

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2013

Evrim Demir Mishchenko

Planning and design of university campuses is as important as the instructional philosophy of universities for determining academic and social development of university…

Abstract

Planning and design of university campuses is as important as the instructional philosophy of universities for determining academic and social development of university students. However, mainstream university campuses have often been designed with typical “normal” or “abled” users in mind and have neglected the needs of students with physical, sensory, and developmental disabilities. Universal design perspective with its equality, social inclusion and social justice agenda can be helpful in giving insights for inclusive educational environments. This study presents a research based design process conducted at a university campus in Turkey to create an inclusive educational environment for the students with disabilities, and to improve their participation in campus' academic and social life. For this purpose, existing campus spaces were evaluated for their inclusiveness both objectively through a checklist and subjectively through participatory workshops and meetings. The findings from both studies were used to identify the needs of the users with disabilities in the campus' settings. The results obtained from these studies were used to inform the implementations, and a holistic plan for creating an inclusive campus environment was developed. This study provides the implications for architectural and urban needs of users with physical, sensory, and vision disabilities or restraints in campus environments, develops methodology for future studies with similar context, and informs about the challenges and opportunities present in the process of creating inclusive university campus environments. .

Details

Open House International, vol. 38 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0168-2601

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 November 2021

JooYoung Seo and Gabriela T. Richard

In response to the underexplored need for holistically inclusive makerspaces for learning, we put propose the “SCAFFOLD” framework, which considers equity, inclusion and…

Abstract

Purpose

In response to the underexplored need for holistically inclusive makerspaces for learning, we put propose the “SCAFFOLD” framework, which considers equity, inclusion and accessibility in the design of spaces and activities for socioculturally diverse learners.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper proposes a universal design (UD) framework that is intersectionally inclusive for learners with diverse needs in makerspaces and maker activities. This paper provides conjecture mapping to put forth theoretical and empirical arguments for the design of holistically inclusive makerspaces that consider gender equity and cultural inclusivity, as well as accessibility for diverse learners with divergent and unique abilities and dis/abilities.

Findings

Combining related literature and three existing UD frameworks (i.e. UD, web accessibility and UD for learning) and prior research on equity and inclusivity in making, this paper proposes the integration of eight principles, which leverage individuals’ diverse abilities to become agentic makers: simplicity, collaboration, accessibility, flexibility, fail-safe, object-oriented, linkability and diversity.

Research limitations/implications

Researchers who have implemented conjecture maps (Lee et al., 2018) have found them to be useful for developing theory and learning designs grounded in research and practice. However, it should be noted that design research is iterative and contextual, and conjecture maps are effective in providing visibility and rigor, but are meant to be flexible and responsive to changes in context (Lee et al., 2018; Sandoval, 2014).

Originality/value

This paper provides practical guidelines and principles for researchers, educators, instructional designers and product developers to assess and redesign makerspaces and activities that are intersectionally and universally inclusive, equitable and accessible.

Details

Information and Learning Sciences, vol. 122 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-5348

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 September 2018

Raymond P. Fisk, Alison M. Dean, Linda Alkire (née Nasr), Alison Joubert, Josephine Previte, Nichola Robertson and Mark Scott Rosenbaum

The purpose of this paper is to challenge service researchers to design for service inclusion, with an overall goal of achieving inclusion by 2050. The authors present…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to challenge service researchers to design for service inclusion, with an overall goal of achieving inclusion by 2050. The authors present service inclusion as an egalitarian system that provides customers with fair access to a service, fair treatment during a service and fair opportunity to exit a service.

Design/methodology/approach

Building on transformative service research, a transformative, human-centered approach to service design is proposed to foster service inclusion and to provide a platform for managerial action. This conceptual study explores the history of service exclusion and examines contemporary demographic trends that suggest the possibility of worsening service exclusion for consumers worldwide.

Findings

Service inclusion represents a paradigm shift to higher levels of understanding of service systems and their fundamental role in human well-being. The authors argue that focused design for service inclusion is necessary to make service systems more egalitarian.

Research limitations/implications

The authors propose four pillars of service inclusion: enabling opportunity, offering choice, relieving suffering and fostering happiness.

Practical implications

Service organizations are encouraged to design their offerings in a manner that promotes inclusion and permits customers to realize value.

Originality/value

This comprehensive research agenda challenges service scholars to use design to create inclusive service systems worldwide by the year 2050. The authors establish the moral imperative of design for service inclusion.

Details

Journal of Service Management, vol. 29 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-5818

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 June 2020

Thomas Peter Gumpel, Judah Koller, Naomi Weintraub, Shirli Werner and Vered Wiesenthal

This article presents a conceptual synthesis of the international literature on inclusive education while expanding upon, and incorporating, the articles in this special…

Abstract

Purpose

This article presents a conceptual synthesis of the international literature on inclusive education while expanding upon, and incorporating, the articles in this special issue. The authors present their 3P model (philosophy, policy and praxis) and relate each paper in this special issue to different aspects of their model.

Design/methodology/approach

This article serves as an epilogue to this special issue of the Journal of Educational Administration as well as a discussion of historical and conceptual distinctions between mainstreaming and inclusion while examining global trends in understanding the move toward inclusive education.

Findings

The authors examined the detrimental effects of ableism and a medical model of disability and their effects on the educational system. They conducted an analysis based on examining the philosophy, policy and practice of the inclusive movement, specifically by examining conceptual models and inclusive decisions, conceptual frameworks for describing inclusive policy and a focus of the application to educational administration. The authors examined the global movement from segregation/exclusion to integration and then to inclusionary praxis.

Research limitations/implications

The authors maintain that the inclusion literature lacks a sound positivistic empirical base, and so they present throughout the article possible avenues for such research as well as future directions for comparative research.

Practical implications

Understanding the philosophical underpinnings of the inclusive movement is central to developing viable inclusive educational settings. The authors distinguish between inclusive schools and local educational authorities where stakeholders have moved toward an inclusionary system (the minority) versus locales who are reluctant to move systems to actual change.

Originality/value

This article takes a wider view of inclusionary practices, from one focusing on children with disabilities to one focusing on historical and traditional exclusionary practices. By widening the scope of the inclusion discussion, to one of exclusion, the authors present a viably wider lens to educational administration.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 58 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 4 February 2015

Robin Drogan and Darlene Perner

This chapter describes the influences that are fundamental to facilitating a system of support for inclusive education for students with low-incidence disabilities. Some…

Abstract

This chapter describes the influences that are fundamental to facilitating a system of support for inclusive education for students with low-incidence disabilities. Some of the major factors are values and beliefs, rights, relationships and a sense of belonging, policy, and effective practices (Smith, 2006; Walther-Thomas, Korinek, McLaughlin, & Williams, 2000). Within each of the features, collaboration is inherent and essential. A summary of literature on each feature is provided with examples to support the importance for students with low-incidence disabilities. The effective practices of Universal Design for Learning (UDL), co-teaching, peer supports, and school-based teams are highlighted. In order to move forward, educators and administrators need to take responsibility for all children. Effective leadership models are characterized by collaborative efforts that foster a shared responsibility of the team, emphasize thoughtful planning, and identify and allocate the necessary resources and supports.

Details

Including Learners with Low-Incidence Disabilities
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-250-0

Keywords

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