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Article
Publication date: 26 October 2020

Vassilios Ziakas and Donald Getz

This paper aims to examine how various academic disciplines shape the field of event portfolio management. Given the complex nature of portfolios comprising different…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine how various academic disciplines shape the field of event portfolio management. Given the complex nature of portfolios comprising different genres that are studied separately from their respective disciplinary realms, the academic event portfolio landscape remains fragmented. This is against the nature of portfolios, which requires inter-disciplinarity and novel integration of genres, stakeholders and perspectives.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on a scoping literature review, this conceptual paper sets up a common ground for the academic study and industrial development of event portfolio management.

Findings

A comprehensive view of event portfolio literature across disciplines reveals its hypostasis as a compound transdisciplinary field. The authors suggest a set of foundational premises whereby they identify 22 principal thematic areas that comprise this emerging field.

Practical implications

The establishment of event portfolio management as a distinct field will help in the osmosis and diffusion of new ideas, models and best practices to run and leverage portfolios. The portfolio perspective highlights the need for cohesive learning to design comprehensive systems of events, implement joint strategies, solidify social networks, coordinate multiple stakeholders and develop methods of holistic evaluation.

Originality/value

By examining comprehensively event portfolio management as a transdisciplinary field, the authors have been able to identify principal research directions and priorities. This comprehensive analysis provides a synergistic ground, which at this embryonic stage of development, can be used to set out joint trajectories and reciprocal foci across the whole span of scholarship studying planned series of events.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 32 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Insights, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9792

Article
Publication date: 1 June 1999

Martin O’Neill, Donald Getz and Jack Carlsen

In stressing the importance of service quality to the events industry this paper seeks to investigate the conceptualisation and measurement of service quality and the…

7725

Abstract

In stressing the importance of service quality to the events industry this paper seeks to investigate the conceptualisation and measurement of service quality and the relationships between service quality, customer satisfaction and repeat visitation at events. It reports the findings from a recently conducted study into service quality at an international event in Western Australia. A visitor survey and unobtrusive observation method were both applied to a surfing event in order to ascertain visitor perceptions of service quality at the event and assist management in a more comprehensive evaluation. In so doing it highlights those features deemed essential.

Details

Managing Service Quality: An International Journal, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-4529

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 9 August 2021

Jeeyeon Jeannie Hahm, Karin Weber, Donald Getz and Rhodri Thomas

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 33 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Article
Publication date: 13 December 2021

Shekhar Shekhar, Anjali Gupta and Marco Valeri

This study aims to map the development of research on family business in tourism and hospitality and provides insights into the key contributors, key areas and current…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to map the development of research on family business in tourism and hospitality and provides insights into the key contributors, key areas and current dynamics, and suggests future research directions in the field.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses the Web of Science (WoS) database to identify the 124 articles published in the theme. The study uses bibliometric indicators such as the co-citation network, word co-occurrence network to analyze the publication and citation structure using Science of Science (Sci2), OpenRefine, and Gephi.

Findings

The top authors, top journals and major themes are recognized using bibliometric techniques. The study identifies six keyword clusters: entrepreneurship, innovation, and empirical collaborating with tourism, hospitality, and family business. The country-wise collaboration indicates the lack of research in the eastern hemisphere of the world. The co-authorship shows studies shared among individuals of a few organizations. The trends from bibliographic coupling depict the evolution of research.

Research limitations/implications

The scope of data collection for the network analysis is limited to the WoS. Incorporating papers from other databases might provide different network structures and insights.

Originality/value

The study is the first of its kind in the theme of family businesses in tourism and hospitality and will contribute to the literature by identifying future research directions.

Details

Journal of Family Business Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2043-6238

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1995

Claudio Minca and Donald Getz

Survey respondents are compared on strategic tourism planning issues in Banff, Alberta, and Niagara Falls (Ontario and New York). Findings reveal areas of consensus and…

Abstract

Survey respondents are compared on strategic tourism planning issues in Banff, Alberta, and Niagara Falls (Ontario and New York). Findings reveal areas of consensus and disagreement in perceptions of issues and preferences for strategies. Three specific issues are considered: the destination life cycle concept, capacity, and destination image. Conclusions are drawn on how public and private‐sector cooperation on destination planning can be fostered when significant differences in perception and preference occur.

Details

The Tourist Review, vol. 50 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0251-3102

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1999

Donald Getz, Ross Dowling, Jack Carlsen and Donald Anderson

Generic factors influencing the development and marketing of wine tourism, both in destinations and at wineries, are examined. Results of surveys of wine and tourism…

2264

Abstract

Generic factors influencing the development and marketing of wine tourism, both in destinations and at wineries, are examined. Results of surveys of wine and tourism industry professionals in Australia and in Washington State, USA, are presented, enabling identification of critical success factors. These are grouped as quality (of wine, service and experiences), wine country appeal, winery appeal, and developmental and marketing factors. Agreement on certain critical success factors did emerge, with quality considered to be the most important success factor, but some significant differences existed between respondents from the two countries examined. Recommendations for ongoing research on wine tourism are made.

Details

International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 March 2010

Donald Getz, Tommy Andersson and J. Carlsen

The purpose of this paper is to develop both a systematic framework and priorities for comparative and cross‐cultural festival management studies, based on literature…

18228

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop both a systematic framework and priorities for comparative and cross‐cultural festival management studies, based on literature review and results of a four‐country study.

Design/methodology/approach

This research is based on four samples of festivals in Sweden, Norway, UK, and Australia that are systematically compared. The survey is designed to profile the festivals in terms of vision/mandate, ownership, age, size, assets, venues used, decision‐making structure, and programs. Costs and revenues are examined in some detail, including trends in each category. Festivals' use of volunteers and sponsors are specifically addressed. Levels of dependence on a number of types of stakeholders and other strategic management issues are also explored. Respondents are also asked to respond to statements regarding challenges and threats to their festival and organization.

Findings

The empirical research identifies important similarities and differences that exist within the UK, Sweden, Norway, and Australia, by three ownership types, in how festivals are organized, their operations and strategies, stakeholder influences and dependencies, threats, and strategies.

Research limitations/implications

In the recommended framework are five components: antecedents; planning and management; planned event experiences and meanings; outcomes and the impacted and dynamic patterns; and processes. Specific points of comparison are enumerated within each component, foundation theories and concepts are identified, and some research priorities suggested for each.

Originality/value

The framework developed in this paper can help advance both the process and applications of comparative festival studies.

Details

International Journal of Event and Festival Management, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1758-2954

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 June 2015

Steve Brown, Donald Getz, Robert Pettersson and Martin Wallstam

The purpose of this paper is to define event evaluation, develop a conceptual model of its process and elements, review pertinent literature, and draw conclusions…

14448

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to define event evaluation, develop a conceptual model of its process and elements, review pertinent literature, and draw conclusions pertaining both to the discourse on evaluation and its praxis.

Design/methodology/approach

General review of literature and development of a conceptual model of the evaluation process.

Findings

The review suggests that impact assessments have dominated, but are only one type of evaluation; research and papers on evaluating the worth of events has been minimal, while those on the evaluation of various management and marketing functions is fragmented.

Research limitations/implications

It is concluded that little has been written about evaluation paradigms and systems, although the discourse on sustainability and triple bottom line accountability has led to a greater emphasis on non-economic considerations.

Originality/value

The conceptual model of the evaluation process and its components offers a systematic approach to shaping evaluation discourse and methods. Conclusions are drawn on how to advance evaluation research and methods applied to events.

Details

International Journal of Event and Festival Management, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1758-2954

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 May 2006

Donald Getz and Graham Brown

This paper seeks to develop a framework for comparisons and benchmarking between wine tourism destinations.

3327

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to develop a framework for comparisons and benchmarking between wine tourism destinations.

Design/methodology/approach

A regional case study was undertaken, including data from a survey of 23 wineries in Canada's Okanagan Valley, British Columbia. The survey provides the winery perspective on development of wine tourism, as well as opinions on what should be done to improve wine tourism.

Findings

Wineries were found to be pursuing tourism developments, but kept little data on visitors and related spending. Their goals and opinions on what is needed in the region revealed that they are mostly oriented toward domestic, independent travelers. One hypothesis emerging from this case study is that the growth and increasing sophistication of wine tourism infrastructure, both at wineries and elsewhere in the region, is in large part a function of market potential. On the supply‐side, a critical mass can be facilitated through establishment of major, landmark wineries that are purpose‐built as tourist attractions.

Practical implications

Using this profile of the Okanagan, implications are drawn for comparisons and benchmarking among wine tourism destinations, including a suggested process and measures.

Research limitations/implications

The single case study limits generalizability to other destinations, and the achieved sample of wineries does not necessarily reflect the major corporate wineries in the Okanagan Valley. More systematic comparison of wine regions is recommended.

Originality/value

This research makes an original contribution for applying the concept and method of benchmarking to wine tourism destinations. It is of value to the wine industry, destination marketers, and host community planners.

Details

International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

Keywords

1 – 10 of 61