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Article
Publication date: 9 February 2015

John Rodwell and Julia Ellershaw

The purpose of this paper is to explore the currency underlying the employment relationship of allied health workers by investigating the mechanisms of their psychological…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the currency underlying the employment relationship of allied health workers by investigating the mechanisms of their psychological contracts.

Design/methodology/approach

Path analyses were conducted on the survey responses from Australian allied health professionals (n=112; a 46 per cent response rate).

Findings

The analyses revealed that psychological contract promises decreased organizational citizenship behaviours relating to the organization (OCBO), while contract fulfilment increased commitment and reduced psychological distress. Contract breach reduced organizational commitment.

Originality/value

The results indicate that obligations may be the primary currency in their psychological contract, with career commitment forming a set of obligations by which employees determine their OCBO, highlighting the nature of the resources exchanged to be targeted to their perceived source, in this case organizational promises begetting discretionary contributions to the organization. Further, fulfilment may reduce uncertainty, which in turn can reduce strain and increase OCBO.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 37 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

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Article
Publication date: 3 June 2019

Richa Chaudhary

This paper aimed to examine the status of implementation of green human resource management (GHRM) practices in Indian automobile Industry. Specifically, the level of…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aimed to examine the status of implementation of green human resource management (GHRM) practices in Indian automobile Industry. Specifically, the level of implementation of five GHRM practices: green recruitment and selection, green training and development, green performance management, green compensation and rewards and green employee involvement was assessed. In addition, an attempt was made to understand how various GHRM practices influence the task-related and voluntary green performance behaviors of employees.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from employees working in automobile industries in India. In all, 91 employees working at various hierarchical levels in the organizations responded to the survey. SPSS 24 was used for the purpose of data analysis.

Findings

The results indicate very low level of implementation of various GHRM practices in the sampled automobile organizations. Among the five GHRM practices, the average score for only green training and development and green employee involvement could reach 3. The lowest scores were found for green performance management and green compensation and rewards. Further, all five GHRM practices were found to significantly predict the task-related and voluntary employee green behaviors.

Practical implications

The findings by providing empirical evidence on the positive association of GHRM practices with employee green behaviors carry significant implications for practicing managers in automobile industry in terms of providing incentives for integrating HRM practices with the environment management systems in the organization.

Originality/value

This paper is one of the pioneer attempts to assess and report the extent of implementation of GHRM practices in Indian automobile industry. This paper also contributes to the limited theoretical literature available on GHRM by empirically investigating its linkage with green performance behaviors of employees.

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Book part
Publication date: 1 March 2012

Ibrahim Duyar and Inayet Aydin

This study focuses on assistant principals, the “forgotten future workforce” of educational leadership. We explored the current landscape of assistant principalship within…

Abstract

This study focuses on assistant principals, the “forgotten future workforce” of educational leadership. We explored the current landscape of assistant principalship within the context of work performance, including both task and discretionary performance, and the future career aspirations of assistant principals from a cross-national perspective. Specifically, the study aimed to fulfill the following objectives: (a) to identify the factors affecting the task and discretionary performance of assistant principals, (b) to identify the factors affecting three future career aspirations of assistant principals, and (c) to determine whether the influences of these factors differ by national origin. Personal initiative and perceived organizational support (POS) were the independent variables. This study also examined the demographic attributes of the participants and their schools. Two randomly selected samples, which composed of 227 Turkish and 144 American assistant principals were the participants. The data-gathering instrument incorporated the revised versions of the Personal Initiative Scale (Fay & Frese, 2001), the Perceived Organizational Support Scale (Eisenberger, Huntington, Hutchison, & Sowa, 1986), and the School Organizational Citizenship Behavior Scale (DiPaola & Tschannen-Moran, 2001). The findings of the study showed that personal initiative and POS significantly predicted the task performance, discretionary performance, and certain future career aspirations of assistant principals. National origin appeared to be a significantly differentiating factor of the assistant principals' task performances, discretionary performances, and future career aspirations. We drew conclusions and provided suggestions for future research.

Details

Discretionary Behavior and Performance in Educational Organizations: The Missing Link in Educational Leadership and Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-643-0

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Article
Publication date: 21 July 2020

Sophia Soyoung Jeong, M. Audrey Korsgaard and Daniel Morrell

The authors test the proposition that there are dark sides to conscientiousness that are revealed when examining lower-level facets. The authors propose that potentially…

Abstract

Purpose

The authors test the proposition that there are dark sides to conscientiousness that are revealed when examining lower-level facets. The authors propose that potentially dysfunctional behavior is triggered by context cues that are relevant to duty versus achievement striving.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conducted two laboratory experiments designed to test how context cues that are specific to duty and achievement striving influence the relationship between these facets and quality versus quantity dimensions of task performance.

Findings

In Study 1, the authors found that normative quality cues led to a stronger relationship between duty and discretionary quality performance. In Study 2, achievement striving was associated with lower levels of quality performance in the presence of competitive feedback cues.

Research limitations/implications

The findings illustrate that the dark side of duty and achievement striving emerges in two ways. First, when there is normative pressure for quality, dutiful individuals are apt to sacrifice efficiency. Second, when there is competitive feedback, achievement striving individuals focus on performance standards at the detriment of quality.

Practical implications

The findings point to the importance of precision and specificity when using personality measures for staffing. Equally important is the informational content of cues conveyed by the social, task and organizational context, in leveraging the impact of personality in the workplace.

Originality/value

This paper clarifies the dark side and bright side contradiction of conscientiousness, adding to the growing literature on unique and often competing consequences of duty and achievement striving. The authors also draw attention to the importance of the content of contextual cues, in trait activation of personality.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 10 June 2019

Albert Amankwaa, Michael Asiedu Gyensare and Pattanee Susomrith

The purpose of this paper is to examine simultaneously multiple mediating mechanisms through which transformational leadership affects innovative work behaviour (IWB)…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine simultaneously multiple mediating mechanisms through which transformational leadership affects innovative work behaviour (IWB). Specifically, the authors test job autonomy, affective commitment and supportive management as the three mediating paths through which transformational leadership predicts innovative wok behaviour.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 358 employees working in large retail banks in Accra, the capital of Ghana. A partial least squares structural equation modelling technique was used to estimate the measurement and structural models.

Findings

Job autonomy and supportive management rather than affective commitment mediated the relationship between transformational leadership and IWB. In addition, transformational leadership positively relates to job autonomy, affective commitment, supportive management and IWB.

Practical implications

By adopting leadership behaviours that seek to offer employees freedom on the job, a feeling of attachment to the organisation and positive perception of leadership support, managers and HR professionals can potentially foster employee innovation. This could stimulate organisational innovation and business success in the financial sector.

Originality/value

Although it is important to understand the mechanisms or processes through which transformational leadership behaviour promotes IWB, research in this area is scanty and scarce. This study theorises and empirically examines job autonomy and support management as novel mechanisms through which transformational leadership behaviour translates into workers’ innovative behaviour in formal banking institutions.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 40 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2019

Adela McMurray, Don Scott and Claire A. Simmers

The purpose of this paper is to examine the constituents of personal discretionary non-work activities and their influence on the work values ethic (WVE).

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the constituents of personal discretionary non-work activities and their influence on the work values ethic (WVE).

Design/methodology/approach

The constituents of personal discretionary non-work activities and their relationship to the WVE for 1,349 employees drawn from three manufacturing companies were surveyed. The data was used to test a measure of WVE, to develop a valid measure of personal discretionary non-work activities and to test a model of the relationship between personal discretionary non-work activities and a WVE.

Findings

Data obtained from the survey enabled the identification of a valid measure of personal discretionary non-work activities and the components that made up this measure. A measure of WVE was shown to be both valid and reliable, and a model of the relationship between personal discretionary non-work activities and WVE was tested.

Research limitations/implications

A positive relationship between personal discretionary non-work activities and WVE was identified. However, the study was not designed to investigate motivations and such relationships should be the subject of future research.

Practical implications

Personal discretionary non-work activities were shown to be of importance for a major proportion of the study’s respondents and to contribute to the employees’ work ethic.

Originality/value

The study has extended the non-work and work literature and has identified a formative non-work measure that was able to be tested in an overall model.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 40 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

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Article
Publication date: 27 November 2020

Lenna V. Shulga and James A. Busser

The purpose of this study is to deepen the understanding of consumers value collaboration with a service provider, specifically, how consumer self-determination affects…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to deepen the understanding of consumers value collaboration with a service provider, specifically, how consumer self-determination affects value co-creation outcomes.

Design/methodology/approach

Self-determination theory (SDT) need-based motivational factors were operationalized in co-creation as commitment to resources (autonomy), feedback (competence) and collectives (relatedness). A between–within factorial experimental design (3 × 2 × 4) was conducted using online scenarios depicting value co-creation in a destination resort setting. Respondents were randomly and equally assigned to strong and weak SDT factor conditions. Next, they were exposed to scenarios depicting four types of value co-creation: co-innovation, co-creation of marketing, co-creation of experience and co-recovery, followed by an assessment of their co-created value (CCV), well-being, satisfaction and service advantage perceptions.

Findings

Results revealed that overall strong SDT conditions produce better outcomes. Consumers’ relatedness showed the strongest difference between strong and weak SDT conditions on the CCV dimensions. Further analysis revealed that autonomy and relatedness are crucial for collaboration. CCV meaningfulness is central for customers to improve their well-being, satisfaction and competitive advantage perceptions through co-creation.

Originality/value

The study contributes to a line of research on successful voluntary value co-creation processes between consumers and a company. The integration of service-dominant logic (SDL), axiology of value (AOV) and SDT, uniquely operationalized as commitment to resources as autonomy, feedback as competence and co-creation collective as relatedness offers a better understanding of how customers appraise the dimensions of CCV and outcomes of well-being, satisfaction and competitive advantage.

Details

Journal of Service Theory and Practice, vol. 31 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2055-6225

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Article
Publication date: 13 May 2014

Sebastian Salicru and John Chelliah

The purpose of the paper is to present a model of leadership fulfiling the need of our times: The leadership psychological contract (LPC). In the current socio-economic…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the paper is to present a model of leadership fulfiling the need of our times: The leadership psychological contract (LPC). In the current socio-economic environment of uncertainty and unprecedented change, both business environments and the community at large are marked by leadership crises. This instability makes an understanding of the relational aspects impacting the relationship between leaders and their constituencies both important and urgent. Now, more than ever before, extraordinary leadership is required. The psychological contract (PC) is recognised as one of the most emergent areas in organisational research. Its contribution to the leadership domain, however, is as yet undiscovered.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper addresses this deficiency by integrating contemporary leadership and PC literature. This paper also addresses criticisms raised in the leadership literature in the past 25 years relating to the scarce leadership research conducted at the unit/team level, despite the rhetoric that the main aim of leadership is in the collaborative domain, as well as the impact of leaders on emotional constructs and motivational or ‘extra-role’ behaviours.

Findings

The LPC is a predictive model that comprises three dependent variables (fulfillment of expectations, trust and fairness) – which constitute the health of the contract or the leader’s integrity/credibility, and four dependent variables (affective commitment, satisfaction, discretionary effort and innovation), which constitute the ‘consequences of the contract’ or the leader’s impact. The LPC model complements previous models of transformational leadership and leader–member exchange theory and addresses various criticisms and recommendations made in literature.

Originality/value

Frameworks such as authentic leadership, ethical leadership, moral leadership, spirituality and leadership each emphasise positive leader – follower relations. Taking into account the LPC and incorporating it into theory and practice should allow researchers to predict leadership effectiveness more completely and effectually than existing positive leadership approaches. The LPC model aims to enhance and refresh the value of effective and ethical leadership approaches that are emerging in response to the current socioeconomic landscape and leadership crises.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 35 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

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Article
Publication date: 4 February 2019

Anita Mohan and Sharon Sophia

The purpose of this paper is to give prominence and further understand the Coleman and Borman (2000) citizenship performance model. This study also aims to determine and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to give prominence and further understand the Coleman and Borman (2000) citizenship performance model. This study also aims to determine and validate the scale formed from the behaviour statements defined by Coleman and Borman in the Indian context by using standard validating measures.

Design/methodology/approach

The citizenship performance construct was measured and validated with a sample of 150 employees working in the IT/ITES sector in Chennai, India. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses were performed on the 27 behavioural statements proposed by Coleman and Borman (2000), which were converted into a five-point Likert scale.

Findings

This paper proposes that citizenship performance can be reliably measured by the 17 items which are based on the 27 citizenship performance behaviour (CPB) statements provided by Coleman and Borman. In addition, it also confirms that citizenship performance is a second-order multi-dimensional construct.

Research limitations/implications

An acceptable but constrained sample was used in this study. The sample frame was limited to the IT/ITES sector in Chennai, a city in Tamil Nadu, India, to minimise cultural influences on the study.

Originality/value

This paper bridges and backs the conceptualisation of the Coleman and Borman (2000) model and the validation of a questionnaire based on their proposed set of CPB statements in the Indian context. This helps to measure the model with its intended questionnaire rather than borrowing items from other scales measuring other dimensions of the OCB domain.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 51 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

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Article
Publication date: 17 October 2016

Muhammad Ali Asadullah, Mehwish Mumtaz, Zillae Batool and Imran Hameed

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effect of leaders’ positive emotions on their followers’ perceptions of leaders’ effectiveness through a serial mediation…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effect of leaders’ positive emotions on their followers’ perceptions of leaders’ effectiveness through a serial mediation mechanism that employed followers’ positive emotions and leaders’ helping behaviors as mediators.

Design/methodology/approach

This study is quantitative in nature. The data for it were collected from supervisors and subordinates in the restaurant and hotel industries of Pakistan. This study used a mix of convenient and purposive/judgmental sampling and the sample consisted of 400 dyads.

Findings

This study has found statistical support for all its hypotheses. In particular, the results of this study have demonstrated that followers’ emotions and leaders’ helping behaviors mediate the relationships between leaders’ positive emotions and followers’ perceptions about their leaders’ effectiveness, acting in the form of a chain.

Practical implications

This study has implications for organizational leaders who are in the process of implementing emotional regulation in the workplace.

Originality/value

This is one of the few studies that has tested a serial mediation model to examine the conditions under which leaders’ positive emotions determine their effectiveness.

Details

South Asian Journal of Global Business Research, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2045-4457

Keywords

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