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Work values ethic and personal discretionary non-work activities

Adela McMurray (College of Business, RMIT University, Melbourne, Australia)
Don Scott (Southern Cross University, Lismore, Australia)
Claire A. Simmers (Department of Management, Erivan K Haub School of Business, Saint Joseph’s University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA)

International Journal of Manpower

ISSN: 0143-7720

Article publication date: 16 January 2019

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the constituents of personal discretionary non-work activities and their influence on the work values ethic (WVE).

Design/methodology/approach

The constituents of personal discretionary non-work activities and their relationship to the WVE for 1,349 employees drawn from three manufacturing companies were surveyed. The data was used to test a measure of WVE, to develop a valid measure of personal discretionary non-work activities and to test a model of the relationship between personal discretionary non-work activities and a WVE.

Findings

Data obtained from the survey enabled the identification of a valid measure of personal discretionary non-work activities and the components that made up this measure. A measure of WVE was shown to be both valid and reliable, and a model of the relationship between personal discretionary non-work activities and WVE was tested.

Research limitations/implications

A positive relationship between personal discretionary non-work activities and WVE was identified. However, the study was not designed to investigate motivations and such relationships should be the subject of future research.

Practical implications

Personal discretionary non-work activities were shown to be of importance for a major proportion of the study’s respondents and to contribute to the employees’ work ethic.

Originality/value

The study has extended the non-work and work literature and has identified a formative non-work measure that was able to be tested in an overall model.

Keywords

Acknowledgements

Ethical approval: all procedures performed in studies involving human participants were in accordance with the ethical standards of the institutional and/or national research committee and with the 1964 Helsinki declaration and its later amendments or comparable ethical standards.

Citation

McMurray, A., Scott, D. and Simmers, C.A. (2019), "Work values ethic and personal discretionary non-work activities", International Journal of Manpower, Vol. 40 No. 4, pp. 704-716. https://doi.org/10.1108/IJM-04-2018-0133

Publisher

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Emerald Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2019, Emerald Publishing Limited