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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2004

Hormoz Movassaghi, Alka Bramhandkar and Milen Shikov

This study examines the fund‐level correlates of return and share price discount or premium for the closed end funds (CEFs) investing in emerging and developed capital…

Abstract

This study examines the fund‐level correlates of return and share price discount or premium for the closed end funds (CEFs) investing in emerging and developed capital markets. It also compares the performance of CEFs investing in emerging markets with similar types of funds that invested in the developed markets, especially significant in light of recent economic crises experienced by a number of such emerging economies and their ripple (contagion) effects felt in other emerging or developed capital markets. Lastly, as emerging markets constitute a wide array of countries with very different economic records, this paper looks into the performance of emerging markets CEFs by region as well as the performance of single‐country versus regional funds. Findings confirmed results of many studies of domestic and international open‐ or closed‐end funds on determinants of return and share price discount or premium. Emerging capital markets also continued to provide an outlet for international investors to improve their portfolio return despite significant volatility that surrounded them during the study period. Lastly, this study did not find any compelling evidence for consistent superior performance by CEFs investing in any particular region or country within the emerging markets.

Details

Managerial Finance, vol. 30 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4358

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Article
Publication date: 2 June 2021

Fernando Angulo-Ruiz, Albena Pergelova and William X. Wei

This research aims to assess variations of motivations when studying international location decisions. In particular, this study aims to assess the influence of diverse…

Abstract

Purpose

This research aims to assess variations of motivations when studying international location decisions. In particular, this study aims to assess the influence of diverse motivations – seeking technology, seeking brand assets, seeking markets, seeking resources and escaping institutional constraints – as determinants of the international location choice of emerging market multinational enterprises (EM MNEs) entering least developed, emerging, and developed countries.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors develop a set of hypotheses based on the ownership–location–internalization framework and complement it with an institutional perspective. The conceptual model posits that the different internationalization motivations (seeking technology, seeking brand assets, seeking markets, seeking resources and escaping institutional constraints) will impact the location choice of EM MNEs in developed economies, emerging markets or least developed countries. This study uses the 2013 survey data collected by the China Council for the Promotion of International Trade and the Asia Pacific Foundation of Canada. The final sample of analysis of this research includes 693 observations.

Findings

After controlling for several variables, two-stage Heckman regressions show there is a variation of motivations when EM MNEs enter least developed countries, emerging markets and developed economies. EM MNEs are motivated to enter least developed countries to seek markets and resources. Conversely, those firms enter developed countries in their search for technological assets and to escape institutional constraints at home. While the present study findings show a clear difference in the motivations that lead to location choice in least developed vs developed countries, the results are not as clear for location in other emerging countries.

Research limitations/implications

The paper offers empirical support for the importance of motivations as crucial determinants of location choice.

Originality/value

This paper provides a detailed quantitative study on the internationalization location choice of EM MNEs based on their motivations. Though theoretical models underscore the importance of motivations, we know very little about how, in practice, motivations drive location choice. This study contributes to the international location choice literature a deeper understanding of how diverse motivations drive choices of expansion into developed economies, emerging markets or least developed countries.

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Article
Publication date: 12 April 2021

Maretno Agus Harjoto and Fabrizio Rossi

This study examines the market reaction to the World Health Organization (WHO) announcement of the novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) as a global pandemic on the…

Abstract

Purpose

This study examines the market reaction to the World Health Organization (WHO) announcement of the novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) as a global pandemic on the emerging equity markets and compares the reaction with developed markets. This study also compares the market reactions to the COVID-19 pandemic with the market reactions to the 2008 global financial crisis.

Design/methodology/approach

Using the Morgan Stanley Capital International daily stock indices data and the Carhart and the GARCH(1,1) models for an event study, the authors examine the cumulative abnormal returns during 30 and 10 trading days and the extended 60 days before and after the WHO pandemic announcement. It also compares the market reactions during the COVID-19 pandemic with the reactions to the Lehman Brothers' bankruptcy announcement during the 2008 global financial crisis.

Findings

This study finds that the COVID-19 pandemic had a significantly greater negative impact to the stock markets in emerging countries than in the developed countries. The negative impact on the emerging markets is more pronounced for firms with small market capitalizations and for growth stocks. The negative impact of the COVID-19 pandemic is stronger in the energy and financial sectors in both emerging and developed markets. The positive impact of the COVID-19 pandemic occurred in healthcare and telecommunications for the emerging markets and information technology for the developed markets. This study also finds that the equity markets in both emerging and developed countries recovered faster from the COVID-19 pandemic relative to the 2008 global financial crisis.

Social implications

Investors' desire to diversify their risks across different countries and sectors in the emerging markets could bring superior returns. The diversification strategies bring critical financial supports to forestall the contagion of COVID-19, to protect lives, and to save the emerging economies, especially for those financially constrained countries that are facing twin health and economic shocks by channeling their investments to countries with weak healthcare systems.

Originality/value

This study extends the literature that examines market reactions to stock market shocks by examining the market reactions to the COVID-19 outbreak on the emerging and developed equity markets across different market capitalizations, valuation and sectors. This study also finds that the markets recovered quicker from the COVID-19 pandemic announcement than during the 2008 global financial crisis.

Details

International Journal of Emerging Markets, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-8809

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Article
Publication date: 29 October 2018

Morungwa Lumka Phala, Yaeesh Yasseen, Nirupa Padia and Waheeda Mohamed

This study aims to compare the extent of voluntary strategy disclosure in the annual/integrated reports of listed companies in an emerging market with the extent of…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to compare the extent of voluntary strategy disclosure in the annual/integrated reports of listed companies in an emerging market with the extent of strategy disclosure in the annual/integrated reports of listed companies in a developed market.

Design/methodology/approach

A developed market sample that was made up of the top 50 companies on the New York Stock Exchange and the Australian Stock Exchange was compared to an emerging market sample that was made up of the top 50 companies on the Johannesburg Stock Exchange and the Bombay Stock Exchange. The comparison was conducted by scoring the amount of strategy disclosure reported in the annual/integrated reports of the companies for the years 2011, 2012 and 2013.

Findings

The emerging market companies had average to good strategy disclosures in their annual reports, whereas the annual reports of companies in the developed market showed low strategy disclosure.

Originality/value

This study expanded upon the limited research available on strategy disclosure by comparing the extent of strategy disclosures in two developmental markets (the developed and emerging market).

Details

Journal of Indian Business Research, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-4195

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Book part
Publication date: 25 September 2020

Letife Özdemir

Purpose: Through globalization, financial markets have become more integrated and their tendency to act together has increased. The majority of the literature states that…

Abstract

Purpose: Through globalization, financial markets have become more integrated and their tendency to act together has increased. The majority of the literature states that there is a cointegration between developed and emerging markets. How do positive or negative shocks in developed markets affect emerging markets? And how do positive or negative shocks in emerging markets affect developed markets? For this reason, the aim of the study is to investigate the asymmetric causality relationship between developed and emerging markets with Hatemi-J asymmetric causality test.

Design/methodology/approach: In this study, the Dow Jones Industrial Average (DJIA) index was used to represent developed markets and the Morgan Stanley Capital International (MSCI) Emerging Market Index was used to represent emerging markets. The asymmetric causality relationship between the DJIA Index and the MSCI Emerging Market Index was investigated using monthly data between January 2009 and April 2019. In the first step of the study, the Johansen Cointegration Test was used to determine whether there is a cointegration between the markets. In the next step, the Hatemi-J asymmetric causality test was applied to see the asymmetric causality relationship between the markets.

Findings: There is a weak correlation between developed and emerging markets. This result is important for international investors who want to diversify their portfolios. As a result of the Johansen Cointegration Test, it was found that there is a long-term relationship between the MSCI Emerging Market Index and the DJIA Index. Therefore, investors who make long-term investment plans should not forget that these markets act together and take into account the causal relationship between them. According to the asymmetric causality test results, a unidirectional causality relationship from the MSCI Emerging Market Index to the DJIA Index was determined. This causality shows that negative shocks in the MSCI Emerging Market Index have positive effects on the DJIA Index.

Originality/value: This study contributes to the literature as it is one of the first studies to examine the asymmetrical relationship between developed and emerging markets. This study is also useful in predicting the short- and long-term relationship between markets. In addition, this study helps investors, portfolio managers, company managers, policymakers, etc., to understand the integration of financial markets.

Details

Uncertainty and Challenges in Contemporary Economic Behaviour
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-095-2

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Book part
Publication date: 13 June 2013

Venkatesh Shankar and Nicole Hanson

Purpose – The purpose of the paper is to advance knowledge on how firms should rethink and develop their innovation architecture by leveraging emerging market

Abstract

Purpose – The purpose of the paper is to advance knowledge on how firms should rethink and develop their innovation architecture by leveraging emerging market opportunities.Design/methodology/approach – The paper provides a conceptual framework comprising the drivers and consequences of innovation architecture across emerging and developed markets. It also highlights emerging market innovation characteristics using detailed examples.Findings/conclusions – Most of the future growth in the global economy will come from emerging markets. Successful global firms will have to rethink and develop their innovation architecture by leveraging innovations developed for emerging markets. By balancing the long-term costs and benefits of innovations in both developed and emerging markets, global firms can successfully reshape their innovation architecture.Practical implications – From a practical perspective, the paper provides guidelines to executives for managing innovation architecture across emerging and developed markets. Innovations appropriately developed and launched in emerging markets have the potential to expand global consumer base and increase shareholder value.Social implications – From a societal standpoint, the paper helps improve consumer welfare in emerging markets by offering a roadmap to develop safe, relevant, and affordable products for mainstream customers. Reverse innovations, developed primarily for emerging markets also benefit consumers in developed markets and enhance their social welfare.Value/originality – The paper provides an original theoretical contribution in an important and underexplored research area – emerging market innovation. It is the first to develop an in-depth analysis of innovation architecture, advance a conceptual framework of the role of emerging markets in the development and consequences of innovation architecture, and offer a roadmap for strategic management of innovation architecture. Academic researchers, practitioners, and policy makers will benefit from this paper.

Details

Review of Marketing Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-761-0

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Article
Publication date: 24 May 2018

Ankur Srivastava and M.S. Balaji

Despite the increasing attention on consumers in emerging markets, there is limited research on the emerging market consumers’ evaluation of global brands. The purpose of…

Abstract

Purpose

Despite the increasing attention on consumers in emerging markets, there is limited research on the emerging market consumers’ evaluation of global brands. The purpose of this paper is to address this research gap by examining the role of consumer dispositions – cosmopolitanism, need for uniqueness and materialism in attitude and purchase intentions toward global brands from emerging vs developed markets.

Design/methodology/approach

A mall intercept method was used to collect responses from shoppers in four major cities in India. The intercept method produced a usable sample of 613 respondents. Each respondent was asked to mark his or her response concerning two global brands – one each from developed and emerging markets separately.

Findings

The findings show that cosmopolitanism and need for uniqueness determine emerging market consumers’ attitude toward global brands. Specifically, the authors find that while cosmopolitanism has a higher positive impact on global brands from the developed market, need for uniqueness has a negative impact on global brands from emerging market.

Research limitations/implications

The study findings show that need for uniqueness negatively affects attitude toward global brands from emerging markets. This presents a significant challenge for global brands from emerging market when competing with the counterparts from developed markets.

Practical implications

The findings show that managers of global brands in emerging markets should develop unique brand positioning that differentiates from international brands. By carefully managing their marketing mix elements (e.g. price, design, distribution), they can induce counter-conformity among consumers for brands that originate in emerging markets.

Originality/value

While prior studies suggest that emerging market consumers prefer foreign brands than domestic brands, little attention was focused on the antecedents for such preference. This study considers consumer dispositions, which were not examined in prior research in addressing this research gap.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 36 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

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Article
Publication date: 15 February 2013

Andreas Größler, Bjørge Timenes Laugen, Rebecca Arkader and Afonso Fleury

The vast majority of literature relating to operations management originates from studies in developed markets. Emerging markets are increasingly important in global…

Abstract

Purpose

The vast majority of literature relating to operations management originates from studies in developed markets. Emerging markets are increasingly important in global business. With this in mind, the purpose of this paper is to analyze differences in outsourcing strategies between manufacturing firms from emerging markets and from developed markets.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on statistical analyses of a large data set of manufacturing firms obtained from the International Manufacturing Strategy Survey (IMSS).

Findings

The findings suggest that companies that outsource internationally focus on achieving cost benefits, while companies that outsource domestically focus on achieving capacity flexibility. In addition, the reasons to outsource were found to be independent of the location of firms in both emerging and developed markets. However, within the group of firms from emerging markets, strategies seem to differ according to whether firms are domestically owned or are subsidiaries of companies from developed markets.

Practical implications

The decisions of firms to outsource do not differ much whether the firms are located in developed‐ or in emergingmarket economies. Firms outsource domestically when they want to increase their capacity flexibility; they outsource internationally when looking for cost advantages.

Originality/value

The value of the paper is that it illuminates an important contemporary phenomenon based on analyses on data from a large‐scale international survey encompassing firms both in developed and in emerging markets.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 33 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 26 October 2012

Paurav Shukla

Despite the growing debate about differences in consumer attitudes and behavior in emerging and developed markets, there is little research on the differences in consumer…

Abstract

Purpose

Despite the growing debate about differences in consumer attitudes and behavior in emerging and developed markets, there is little research on the differences in consumer value perceptions and their influence on purchase intentions. Focusing on the theory of impression management, the purpose of this paper is to introduce a conceptual framework incorporating the social (conspicuousness and status), personal (hedonism and materialism) and functional (uniqueness and price‐quality perceptions) value perceptions using the context of luxury goods.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected through a structured questionnaire‐ based study of consumers in four countries, representing two leading Western developed luxury markets (the US and the UK) and two important Eastern emerging markets (India and Malaysia). Multiple‐group SEM analysis was used to analyze the data.

Findings

The findings show several differences in the influence of value perceptions on consumer purchase intentions in the Western developed and Eastern emerging markets. The study highlights the importance of understanding the homogeneity and heterogeneity in consumer consumption decisions and provides managers with a basis to adapt their strategic responses.

Originality/value

The results offer needed empirical support and cross‐cultural stability to the much theorized construct of value perceptions by exploring their effects within and between Western developed and Eastern emerging markets. Additionally, it unifies and complements the previous work by integrating the theory of impression management and value perceptions framework, thus providing a comprehensive theoretical framework with empirical support.

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Article
Publication date: 2 October 2009

Sabur Mollah and Asma Mobarek

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the time‐varying risk return relationship and the persistence of shocks to volatility within GARCH framework both in developed

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the time‐varying risk return relationship and the persistence of shocks to volatility within GARCH framework both in developed and emerging markets.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper uses nonlinear ARCH and GARCH‐family models for testing the volatility both in developed and emerging markets.

Findings

The findings of the paper suggest that there is a long‐term persistence shock in emerging markets compared to developed markets.

Research limitations/implications

The data set used for the developed and emerging markets is not consistent in terms of sample period. However, this paper explores the venues for further research on the global diversification.

Practical implications

The implication of volatility measurement is vital in determining the cost of capital for investment and portfolio management, option pricing and for market regulations.

Originality/value

The unique features of the paper include large sample size with updated data set that reveals the nature of world economy and empirical evidence on volatility testing that reports the risk return characteristics of both developed and emerging markets.

Details

Studies in Economics and Finance, vol. 26 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1086-7376

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