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Article
Publication date: 27 July 2011

Lamia Ben Hamida

The purpose of this paper is two‐fold: to discuss the key factors determining foreign direct investment (FDI) intra‐industry spillovers and to examine the presence and the…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is two‐fold: to discuss the key factors determining foreign direct investment (FDI) intra‐industry spillovers and to examine the presence and the extent of these spillovers in Switzerland, by testing them for the services/construction industry, where there is currently a scarcity of evidence.

Design/methodology/approach

The assessment of spillovers calls for a detailed analysis of these effects according to the mechanisms by which they occur (namely, the increase in competition, demonstration effects, and worker mobility), and whether the size and the extent of spillovers depend on the interaction between their mechanisms and the existing technological capacities of domestic firms.

Findings

The regression results are affirmative, in that domestic firms with high technological capacities appear to gain spillover benefits from FDI heightening competition, while mid‐ and low‐technology firms benefit a lot from demonstration effects. In addition, spillovers for high‐ and mid‐technology firms appear to be largely co‐determined by the level of their human capital. Only domestic firms that invested heavily in absorptive capacity benefit from spillovers.

Research limitations/implications

The evidence on spillover effects has not yet been conclusive. Hence, this paper proposes some components for a research agenda on FDI and intra‐industry spillovers.

Practical implications

The study provides insights for Swiss policy makers about how to promote the beneficial spillover effects of FDI.

Originality/value

The process of spilling over is correctly described in a more satisfactory model and then the impact of this process is accurately identified.

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Book part
Publication date: 1 January 2008

Lamina Ben Hamida and Philippe Gugler

This chapter examines intra-industry spillover effects from inward foreign direct investment (FDI) in Swiss manufacturing firms. It suggests that (a) the assessment of…

Abstract

This chapter examines intra-industry spillover effects from inward foreign direct investment (FDI) in Swiss manufacturing firms. It suggests that (a) the assessment of spillovers calls upon a detailed analysis of these effects according to the mechanisms by which they occur (viz. the increase of competition, demonstration effects, and worker mobility), and (b) spillovers depend on the interaction between their mechanisms and the levels of domestic absorptive capacity. Results are affirmative in that high-technology firms benefit from FDI heightening competition, while mid-technology firms benefit from demonstration effects. And low-technology firms, which are not able to benefit from foreign affiliates via demonstration effects alone, manage to reap the benefit via the recruitment of MNCs labor. In addition, only firms which largely invest in absorbing foreign technology benefit from spillovers.

Details

New Perspectives in International Business Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-279-1

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Article
Publication date: 16 October 2017

Chong-Hoe Kim and Byung Il Park

The purpose of this paper is to pinpoint key conduits promoting knowledge spillovers through inward foreign direct investment in the banking sector.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to pinpoint key conduits promoting knowledge spillovers through inward foreign direct investment in the banking sector.

Design/methodology/approach

The data were obtained by a survey. The survey data were collected from managers of five major local banks in Korea. The survey was conducted during May 10-June 30, 2015 with a total of 581 self-administered responses finally collected at the end (response rate: 60.5 percent).

Findings

Based on the survey data collected from the survey, the results indicate that knowledge spillovers from foreign to local banks occur in the Korean context. Demonstration effect, worker mobility and absorptive capacity of local banks are found to be effective conduits for knowledge spillovers. In addition, the authors have also found that competitive pressure negatively influences worker mobility leading to knowledge spillovers while two other elements (i.e. demonstration effect and absorptive capacity) positively mediate the relationship between competitive pressure and knowledge spillovers.

Practical implications

It is essential for the managers of multinational banks vigorously consider placing a strong emphasis on security of internal information and management of own personnel as the knowledge outflow through the demonstration effect and worker mobility is critical. For the managers of local banks, the discoveries suggest that active investment in human resources to maximize knowledge spillovers through the demonstration effect and through absorptive capacity is heightened by building an internal knowledge base.

Originality/value

The study contributes to the extant literature in the field of international business in two key ways. First, it examines the knowledge spillovers in the banking sector, a regulated industry, in Korea where empirical research is sparse. This paper’s second contribution is the finding of the key conduits of knowledge spillover phenomena by predicting and identifying the elements which affect the magnitude of knowledge flows from foreign to local banks.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 55 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Book part
Publication date: 17 June 2013

Tarun Banerjee

What is the relationship between a social movement and the media coverage it receives? Using data on the Tea Party and supplementing it with a broad dataset of coverage in…

Abstract

What is the relationship between a social movement and the media coverage it receives? Using data on the Tea Party and supplementing it with a broad dataset of coverage in nearly 200 state and local newspapers over an 18-month period, I address key questions on the recursive relationship between media coverage and mobilization. Results provide support for the mobilizing influence of the media. Instead of following protest activity as post-facto news, coverage tended to precede mobilization and was its most important predictor. Second, the conservative media occupied a distinct and indirect position in impacting mobilization. Though not direct predictors of mobilization, conservative media coverage was a strong predictor of subsequent coverage in the broader media. Further, this influence was asymmetrical, with the general media having no impact on conservative media. Finally, results suggest that the conservative frame of “liberal media bias” enabled a unique mobilizing effect where negative coverage in the broader media increased mobilization. These findings shed light on the dynamic relationship between movements, protests, and the media, and that of conservative movements in particular.

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Research in Social Movements, Conflicts and Change
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-732-0

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Article
Publication date: 3 April 2009

Yufen Chen and Jin Chen

Whether foreign direct investment (FDI) can promote technology progress in the host country, or not, has become an issue in recent decades. The purpose of this paper is to…

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1456

Abstract

Purpose

Whether foreign direct investment (FDI) can promote technology progress in the host country, or not, has become an issue in recent decades. The purpose of this paper is to analyze the impact of FDI on regional technological capabilities.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper first analyzes the spillover effects of FDI with reference to actual conditions in foreign‐funded enterprises in China, then uses correlation analysis and regression analysis to show the impact of FDI on technological capabilities. This paper compares the R&D expenditures in foreign‐funded enterprises and FDI origin countries between three typical regions – Shanghai, Jiangsu, and Guangdong – to show the influencing factors of spillovers.

Findings

The impact of FDI on regional technological capabilities is found to be weak; FDI has little use for enhancing indigenous innovation capability. The regions with higher technological capabilities will attract the higher quality of inward FDI, and the powerful technological capabilities and abundant human capitals in domestic enterprises are essential factors to stimulate the spillover effects of FDI.

Research limitations/implications

The arguments could be discussed more fully if an empirical model could be established to disclose the determinants of spillover effects. How to measure the spillover effects quantitatively is a key problem for future research.

Originality/value

This paper discloses the mutual relationship between domestic and foreign‐funded enterprises. The findings in this paper provide some insights for both the host countries and the foreign investors.

Details

Journal of Knowledge-based Innovation in China, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-1418

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Article
Publication date: 21 September 2015

Christopher A. Hartwell and Bryane Michael

The penetration of foreign banks into emerging markets has been linked with financial sector deepening and expansion of credit. However, there is little research into the…

Abstract

Purpose

The penetration of foreign banks into emerging markets has been linked with financial sector deepening and expansion of credit. However, there is little research into the interaction of financial sector institutions with broader transition and development dynamics. The purpose of this paper is to examine if the presence of foreign financial institutions helped to shape a better business environment over the long-run in emerging markets.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors use aggregate, country-level annual data for 107 developed and emerging market countries over a shifting 30-year time span (1983-2012). The authors use Prais-Winsten and System-GMM techniques on stationary variables to highlight linkages between foreign banks and the overall business environment. Where data were found to be non-stationary, the authors applied panel cointegration approaches, including Granger Causality and full-modified OLS, to research the same relationship.

Findings

The results show that foreign bank entry in emerging markets has had a positive effect in the broader business environment, with the biggest effects on legal protection, competitiveness, and time to import/export.

Research limitations/implications

This paper does not consider the broader effects of foreign bank entry on competition within emerging markets, an area that the authors are considering as fruitful for future research.

Originality/value

The issue of financial sector impact on broader business environment issues has not been studied in the extant literature. Moreover, this study makes an important contribution for policymakers who are grappling with issues related to financial sector regulation in the post-global financial crisis world.

Details

International Journal of Emerging Markets, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-8809

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 26 June 2019

Ting-gui Chen, Gan Lin and Mitsuyasu Yabe

The purpose of this paper is to study the impact of outward foreign direct investment (OFDI) on the productivity of parent firms over the food industry.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study the impact of outward foreign direct investment (OFDI) on the productivity of parent firms over the food industry.

Design/methodology/approach

The main data in this paper are derived from the China Industrial Enterprise Database 2005–2013 and a data set of Chinese firms’ OFDI information. Then this paper uses propensity score matching to match the treatment and control groups with firm characteristics and combines that with the differences-in-differences method to estimate the real effect of OFDI on total factor productivity.

Findings

The food firm’s OFDI significantly improves the parent firm’s productivity (known as the OFDI own-firm effect), but this promotion only exists in the short term. The OFDI own-firm effect of food firms differs remarkably as the sub-sectors, regions and ownership of firms vary. The food firm’s OFDI in “non-tax havens” and high-income destinations has a significantly stronger effect on the parent firm’s productivity. FDI, R&D and exporting can effectively strengthen the OFDI own-firm effect of food firms.

Originality/value

The effect of OFDI on food industry productivity has not been researched yet. This paper aims to fill this gap. This paper further divides the characteristics of food firms into different sub-sectors, regions and ownership types for a comparative analysis, with the aim of conducting a more comprehensive study at the micro-level of firms. In addition, an investigation into which factors influence the degree of the OFDI own-firm effect at the micro-level has not been found in the literature. This paper will draw its own conclusions.

Details

China Agricultural Economic Review, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-137X

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Article
Publication date: 21 May 2009

Xiaowen Tian and Shuanglin Lin

Using panel data of 11324 firms in China from 1996 to 1999, the study finds that FDI tends to generate positive technology spillovers to domestic firms within the same…

Abstract

Using panel data of 11324 firms in China from 1996 to 1999, the study finds that FDI tends to generate positive technology spillovers to domestic firms within the same industry, but adversely affect productivity of domestic firms in other industries. It is also found that both the positive and the adverse effects are more significant at the local than the national level. Evidence from China thus suggests that FDI technology spillovers are in favor of domestic firms within the same industry rather than domestic firms in other industries, and are most likely to affect domestic firms within the same locality. The finding has significant implications for the study of the interaction between MNEs and local firms in emerging markets.

Details

Journal of Asia Business Studies, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1558-7894

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 27 May 2021

Ying Song, Yi Zhang, Yafei Wang, Bowen Zhang and Jiafu Su

Taking 30 provincial samples from 2001 to 2017 in mainland China as the research objects, this paper aims to evaluate the impact and effects of foreign direct investment…

Abstract

Purpose

Taking 30 provincial samples from 2001 to 2017 in mainland China as the research objects, this paper aims to evaluate the impact and effects of foreign direct investment (FDI) on the urban–rural income gap and reveals heterogeneity across regions.

Design/methodology/approach

Firstly, the Theil index is used to measure the income gap between 30 provinces in mainland China from 2001 to 2017, then the spatial econometric model is used to empirically test the impact of foreign direct investment on China’s urban–rural income gap and its heterogeneity across regions. Finally, a robustness test is performed.

Findings

The results show that there is a significant inverted U-shaped relationship between FDI and the urban–rural income gap in China. That is, FDI expands the urban–rural income gap in the short term and helps to converge it in the long term. In the eastern region, FDI has a convergence effect on the urban–rural income gap in the short term, which increases the long term. However, in the central and western regions, the relationship between FDI and urban–rural income gap has a weak inverted U shape.

Originality/value

By assessing the impact of FDI on the urban–rural income gap, this work provides decision-making support for China and other developing countries to improve investment policies and income distribution policies.

Details

Kybernetes, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

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Article
Publication date: 8 August 2018

Ran Zhou, Kyriaki Kaplanidou, Dimitra Papadimitriou, Nicholas D. Theodorakis and Kostantinos Alexandris

The purpose of this paper is to explore the sources of inspiration for active participants in sport events, and the link between inspiration sources and event-related…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the sources of inspiration for active participants in sport events, and the link between inspiration sources and event-related outcomes (i.e. life satisfaction and behavioral intentions).

Design/methodology/approach

Research questions were examined using a Greek (n=264) and a US (n=103) sample of participants of two small-scale running events. Content analysis was used to identify and code the themes of inspiration, while a multivariate analyses of variance was performed to test the inspiration group differences on life satisfaction and behavioral intentions.

Findings

The qualitative findings revealed three categories of inspiration source identified in each sample. The quantitative results showed that the interaction between inspiration source and event type had an overall effect on participants’ life satisfaction and future participation intention. Specifically, findings highlighted the different roles of inspiration on influencing life satisfaction and participation intention of short-distance (i.e. 5 and 10k) event participants than those of long-distance (i.e. marathon) runners.

Research limitations/implications

This study identifies the sources of inspiration in small-scale sport events and provides preliminary empirical evidence where inspiration source and event type jointly influence participants’ life satisfaction and behavioral intentions.

Practical implications

Understanding the sources of inspiration provides event leveraging opportunities to inspire citizens to become more active in sports. Given that the sources of inspiration vary among different segments of event participants, event managers need to adopt differential communication and promotional activities geared to the needs of these targets.

Originality/value

The study provides the first empirical work exploring the sources of inspiration among active participants in small-scale sport events.

Details

International Journal of Event and Festival Management, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1758-2954

Keywords

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