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1 – 10 of over 188000
Book part
Publication date: 12 October 2018

Chloe Downes, Roya Rahimi and Peter Robinson

This chapter investigates the role of social media in enhancing the interactions between customers and event management. It is based on a field study conducted on three UK…

Abstract

This chapter investigates the role of social media in enhancing the interactions between customers and event management. It is based on a field study conducted on three UK horse racing events using a set of interviews and questionnaires to probe the views of the audience and the managers. Findings underscore the growing importance of social media, which are progressively embraced by consumers as part of their daily communication mix. Horse racing customers are likely to use social media to leave event feedback. While there is demand for a reply, interviewed managers admit a weakness regarding the use of social media to gain post-event feedback − which can act as an important means to engage and co-create value with customers.

Details

Quality Services and Experiences in Hospitality and Tourism
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-384-1

Keywords

Abstract

Details

The Brexit Referendum on Twitter
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-294-9

Open Access
Book part
Publication date: 20 February 2023

Brita Ytre-Arne

This conclusion summarizes key insights from the former chapters, and highlights political dimensions of media use in digital everyday life. I particularly underline how

Abstract

This conclusion summarizes key insights from the former chapters, and highlights political dimensions of media use in digital everyday life. I particularly underline how our more digital everyday lives intensify communicative dilemmas, in which individuals in everyday settings negotiate with societal norms and power structures through their uses of media technologies. I also discuss how everyday media use connects us to different societal spheres and issues, also pointing to global challenges such as the pandemic and the climate crisis, arguing that everyday media use is key to our understandings of society. I discuss how to analyze this in media use research, emphasizing attention to processes of change and disruption.

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Media Use in Digital: Everyday Life
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80262-383-3

Article
Publication date: 11 October 2021

Kimberly W. O'Connor, Kimberly S. McDonald, Brandon T. McDaniel and Gordon B. Schmidt

The purpose of this exploratory study is to examine individual perceptions about the impact that social media use has on career satisfaction and perceived career benefits…

912

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this exploratory study is to examine individual perceptions about the impact that social media use has on career satisfaction and perceived career benefits. We examined whether informal online learning through “typical” types of social media behaviors (e.g. liking a post or messaging another user) and “networking” types of social media behaviors (e.g. endorsing another user, writing recommendations, going “live,” or looking for a job) impacted career-related perceptions.

Design/methodology/approach

In this study, we analyzed Amazon Mechanical Turk survey data gathered from adult participants (n = 475). We focused our inquiry specifically on two social media sites, Facebook and LinkedIn. We asked participants about their social media use and behaviors, as well as their perceptions of career satisfaction and career benefits related to social media.

Findings

We found that both typical and networking types of social media behaviors positively predicted the “knowing whom” career competency (defined as career relevant networks and contacts that individuals use to develop their careers) and career satisfaction. Only networking behaviors were positively associated with perceived career benefits of social media use. We further found that LinkedIn users’ career satisfaction was lower compared to non-LinkedIn users.

Originality/value

This study adds to the small, but growing body of career research focusing on social capital and social media. Our results suggest that informal online learning via social media may have a positive impact on employees’ career-related perceptions.

Details

Development and Learning in Organizations: An International Journal, vol. 36 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7282

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 23 August 2011

Nuria Lloret Romero

In all projections for 2011, ROI has become of the great challenges of social media marketing for the business environment. However in the case of non‐profit…

8719

Abstract

Purpose

In all projections for 2011, ROI has become of the great challenges of social media marketing for the business environment. However in the case of non‐profit organizations, there is no need for such calculations. It is not as necessary to know how the effort made in these media compares to the benefits that can be obtained. This paper aims to compare the parameters governing social media ROI at an enterprise level and at the level of non‐profit institutions. Additionally, the use of social media tools in a strategic plan and to save costs in the institution is discussed.

Design/methodology/approach

Where ROI is defined as a mere indicator of return on investment, it involves the direct costs and revenues of each transaction. Combining the world of social media marketing, which is full of intangibles, with the current crisis makes knowing “real” return one of the greatest current needs. When demanding returns from institutions that have never been analyzed from this standpoint, it is important to understand how a tool like this can be used to justify an entity's visibility, brand improvement and ultimately, an increase in the institution's quality and use by users. Also, it should be taken into account that while in 2010 branding was the primary goal of communication in social media, this year in view of the increasingly endemic crisis, a ROI analysis can help an institution to evidence how the cost savings inherent in using these as opposed to former marketing tools substantiate their use. However, this interest involves a great risk of simplification.

Findings

The analysis used to measure ROI can follow these lines: The consumption by previous users can be compared with that of current arrivals on the network. Comparisons can be made between the behavior of a user prior to following the library on social media and after doing so. The extent to which the success of new developments, events etc. has improved after being communicated in social networks can be measured. The influence of brand perception on users' consumption and the extent to which the new media have changed this perception can be measured.

Originality/value

Conducting a ROI analysis of a library's social media marketing campaign can help it evaluate various aspects in the library. Social media can be considered as an interesting information dissemination tool requiring only minimal effort which can be used by the library to promote reading and publicize its informational and cultural efforts. Social media can also be used as dynamic, provision of service and marketing resources with a clear reduction in costs compared to other more traditional types of advertising and publicizing. Given that in the management of these tools, it is the contents and ideas that are essential rather than the economic resources available, social media are particularly useful for small and medium libraries as they provide the possibility of increasing the visibility of the institution and improving its service and its users' experience. Opening a new channel of communication with users on the internet is a challenge for libraries that can be optimized with the development of a strategy for the use of social media. The library should make an effort to manage these resources efficiently and obtain the largest possible return on their use.

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The Bottom Line, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0888-045X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2003

Will Collin

Account planning grew out of a combination of the complementary roles of consumer research and media planning. Over time it has moved away from the traditional advertising…

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Abstract

Account planning grew out of a combination of the complementary roles of consumer research and media planning. Over time it has moved away from the traditional advertising agencies to media independents that act as ever more influential advisors into their clients’ marketing communications strategies. Media strategists have usurped part of the original account planning role in giving advice on how to reach consumers, but they stop short of recommending what the message should be when contact is finally made. This remains the preserve of account planning and the creative team. However, account planners and media planners exhibit their own vested interests. This paper reports on an emerging new generation of marketing communications strategists who seek to overcome the limitations of both. They extend their perspectives on marketing communications beyond advertising and have no vested interest in any particular media solution (media neutrality). These companies do not execute the implementation of the campaign, produce the creative content, or pay for its delivery, yet they act as campaign integrators.

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Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 21 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1972

Kjell Grønhaug

Reports on an empirical study of media decisions: the findings show, not unexpectedly, that advertising agencies with a separate media department use more information and…

Abstract

Reports on an empirical study of media decisions: the findings show, not unexpectedly, that advertising agencies with a separate media department use more information and carry out more detailed selection processes. Decides to consider some of the factors that may influence the choice of media and believes the type of insight this approach could give might be of benefit to the parties involved. Considers advertising to be an effective weapon in competition – it is they who bear the advertising costs. Sums up that it is reasonable to assume that better media choice can be achieved by taking account of the conditions to which attention is drawn.

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European Journal of Marketing, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1999

Raymond Boyle

The last number of years has seen a growing importance placed on media relations by police forces throughout the UK. This has resulted in an increased concern with public…

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Abstract

The last number of years has seen a growing importance placed on media relations by police forces throughout the UK. This has resulted in an increased concern with public relations practice and in particular that area focused on media relations. This study centres on Strathclyde Police, the largest force in Scotland and among the largest in the UK. Outside of the Metroplitan Police, Strathclyde, has been throughout the 1990s at the forefront in developing more pro‐active media relations strategies. This paper examines the development of the Spotlight Intiative which attempted to tackle low level, quality of life crime (in some quarters associated with the phrase “zero tolerance”). Central to Spotlight has been the development of a more systematic and structured approach to public relations focused on the role of the media, specifically local and Scottish national newspapers, in communicating with local communities. This research argues that the growing importance of media relations at the Strathclyde force has broader implications for police‐media relations throughout the UK.

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Corporate Communications: An International Journal, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1356-3289

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1991

Paula J. Haynes

Advertising effectiveness depends on good media selection. Mediadecisions are typically based upon consummatory, or usage, measures.Though perceived usefulness…

1771

Abstract

Advertising effectiveness depends on good media selection. Media decisions are typically based upon consummatory, or usage, measures. Though perceived usefulness (instrumental media behaviour) is generally not a consideration, consumers′ perceptions of media types as useful have definite implications for advertising and promotional decisions. Moreover, perceived usefulness of a media type cannot simply be inferred from usage data. This study examines both the reported use of and perceived usefulness of media categories. Though newspapers were reported by respondents to be the most useful media type, the relationship between amount of use (consummatory) and perceived usefulness (instrumental) was strongest for magazines and radio. Findings suggest that television advertising may have less impact, and radio advertising greater impact than often assumed. Findings also suggest a segment of instrumentally prone media users.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 9 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

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