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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1996

Daewoo Park

Notes that previous researchers have investigated the relationship between gender role (i.e. sex‐role identity) and leadership style, and they also have investigated the…

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Abstract

Notes that previous researchers have investigated the relationship between gender role (i.e. sex‐role identity) and leadership style, and they also have investigated the relationship between decision style and leadership style. However, points out that they have not investigated the relationship between gender role and decision style. Using three validated questionnaires with 90 participants, attempts to test the relationship between gender role, decision style and leadership style. Reveals, from the results, strong support for the proposed relationships: masculinity/directive/analytical/task‐oriented styles and femininity/conceptual/behavioural/relations‐oriented styles. Provides implications/application questions for practitioners, for example that “linking the people with the strategic needs of the business” (i.e. strategic human resource management emphasizing competence acquisition, development and utilization) requires an in‐depth analysis for many organizations. Suggests that instead of relying on a single measure, a combination of different measures may result in higher reliability and predictability. Concludes that the development of effective human resources training and management programmes requires further exploration of the relationship between gender role, decision style and leadership style.

Details

Women in Management Review, vol. 11 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-9425

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Article
Publication date: 7 March 2008

Richard J. Eberlin and B. Charles Tatum

The purpose of this paper is to show that participants read vignettes in which managers were assigned different roles. The vignettes depicted managers with two leadership…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to show that participants read vignettes in which managers were assigned different roles. The vignettes depicted managers with two leadership styles (transformational/transactional) and two decision‐making approaches (comprehensive/restrictive). The managers were then rated on patterns of organizational justice (social/ structural). Leadership and decision‐making styles affected different forms of justice.

Design/methodology/approach

Participants rated performance‐evaluation vignettes depicting leadership style, decision‐making approach, and organizational justice patterns on the part of hypothetical managers/leaders.

Findings

Managers portrayed as transformational leaders were rated high on social justice, whereas leaders rated as transactional were high on structural justice. Managers portrayed as restricted in their decision‐making approach were rated lower on social justice compared with managers who used a more comprehensive decision style. Justice ratings were significantly influenced by leadership style and decision

Practical implications

It is suggested that an increased awareness regarding organizational justice is imperative for all decision and leadership styles, and that social justice can occur in brief but powerful encounters that can be executed by any manager or leader.

Originality/value

If organizations, managers, and leaders attend to justice issues, they will foster healthier and more productive workplace environments that extend beyond immediate performance indicators (e.g. budget, quarterly profits, sales and revenue). A focus on organizational justice will create long‐term performance cultures (by fostering employee development, extending genuine regard for employee contributions and wellbeing, and leveraging employee commitment), and lead companies to sustainability.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 46 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 14 September 2012

Ismail Hussein Amzat and Datuk Abdul Rahman Idris

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the effect of management and decision‐making styles on the job satisfaction of academic staff in a Malaysian Research University.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the effect of management and decision‐making styles on the job satisfaction of academic staff in a Malaysian Research University.

Design/methodology/approach

The sample consisted of 218 respondents. The instruments used in the study were the Teacher Job Satisfaction Questionnaire and the Decision Style Inventory. Structural Equation Modelling (SEM) was used to determine the influence of decision‐making style and management style on the job satisfaction.

Findings

The findings showed that the research university had adopted an analytical decision‐making style. The hygiene factors were the predictors of job satisfaction as perceived by the academic staff at the research university in Malaysia.

Research limitations/implications

This research selected a top Malaysian research university and small samples were selected from the whole population under consideration, thus, the findings can be generalized as similar to other research universities. In addition, the university management determines the decision‐making style, and the job satisfaction of the academic staff is affected by the decision‐making style of the university.

Originality/value

A contribution is made to the literature as the research reinforces the view that the management style and decision‐making style can predict or affect the job satisfaction of the academic staff.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 26 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 March 2019

C. Muhammad Siddique and Hinna Fatima Siddique

This paper aims to examine managerial decision-making approaches, their antecedents and consequences in the Arabian Gulf context. Using recent survey data, the study…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine managerial decision-making approaches, their antecedents and consequences in the Arabian Gulf context. Using recent survey data, the study offers a critical assessment of prevailing myths about decision-making styles in the Arabian Gulf.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey data were collected from a sample of 432 managers working in public and private sector companies in the United Arab Emirates (UAE). A combination of statistical techniques including confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) and hierarchical regression analysis was used to test research hypotheses.

Findings

The findings of this study question the myth that UAE or Gulf managers mostly pursue consultative and participative styles of management. Most UAE managers continue to practice an autocratic and a pseudo-consultative style of decision-making, undermining the value of employee input in the decision-making process. The data revealed a strong negative relationship between autocratic management style and a range of personal and organizational outcomes such as job satisfaction, organizational commitment, organizational citizenship behavior, performance and innovative human resource management practices pertaining to work-family life balance and diversity programs. Most employees perceived autocratic management style as a major source of job stress, absenteeism and turnover. Socio-demographic characteristics of managers and their work organizations, considered as antecedents of decision-making styles, played a limited role in shaping decision-making approaches or their consequences. Globalization and associated socio-cultural changes that UAE and other Gulf region countries have experienced over the past two decades seem to have only a marginal impact on decision-making styles.

Research limitations/implications

Use of perceptual survey data places some constraints on the generalizability of our findings. Future research may address this issue with multiple data sources including an in-depth case study.

Practical implications

The findings of this research should be of special interest to both domestic and multinational companies in seeking alignment of their management approaches with the emerging competitive business environment in UAE and other Gulf countries. Theoretically, the paper documents the value of the continuum theory of managerial behavior in UAE and the Arabian Gulf context.

Originality/value

The study represents a first major effort to develop and test a comprehensive conceptual model of antecedents and consequences of managerial decision-making styles in UAE, which may be extended to other countries in the Arabian Gulf region. The value-added contribution of the study may be seen in its critical analysis of prevailing beliefs and assumptions about management practices in the Arabian Gulf.

Article
Publication date: 15 February 2021

Arosha S. Adikaram and Pavithra Kailasapathy

The decision-making styles of human resource professionals (HRPs) in resolving complaints of sexual harassment are extremely important as they form the backbone of…

Abstract

Purpose

The decision-making styles of human resource professionals (HRPs) in resolving complaints of sexual harassment are extremely important as they form the backbone of effectiveness in the resolution of a complaint. The purpose of this paper is to explore these decision-making styles and gauge their effectiveness in resolving such complaints.

Design/methodology/approach

Employing a qualitative research approach, semi-structured interviews were conducted with 35 HRPs of 30 companies in Sri Lanka.

Findings

We found eight decision-making styles used by HRPs in resolving complaints of sexual harassment: (1) analytical, (2) behavioural, (3) directive, (4) conceptual, (5) avoidant, (6) dependent, (7) intuitive and judgemental, and (8) manipulative and persuasive. HRPs were found to generally adopt combinations of these styles, with one or two styles being dominant while one or two were used as back-up styles. In resolving complaints of sexual harassment, certain combinations of these styles were found to be more effective than others because they led to procedural, distributive and interactional justice.

Practical implications

The implications of these findings for self-reflection and in training for the HRPs are also discussed.

Originality/value

The findings of this study assist us in understanding how and why HRPs make different decisions when resolving seemingly similar complaints and the effectiveness of such decisions.

Details

Employee Relations: The International Journal, vol. 43 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1987

Larry B. Pate and Donald C. Heiman

It should be re‐emphasized, however, that the [Vroom‐Yetton] model is explicitly normative in character in that it specifies what leaders should do in various…

Abstract

It should be re‐emphasized, however, that the [Vroom‐Yetton] model is explicitly normative in character in that it specifies what leaders should do in various organizational circumstances — rather than attempting to summarize what leaders do do and what the effects of those actions are. Thus, if the assumptions in the model about the outcomes which result from various leader behaviors are incorrect, the model will lead to faulty behavioral prescriptions.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Article
Publication date: 11 February 2022

Sumedha Weerasekara and Ramudu Bhanugopan

This study aims to investigate the impact of entrepreneurs’ decision-making styles on enterprise performance and suggests several entrepreneurial ecosystems – factors are…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the impact of entrepreneurs’ decision-making styles on enterprise performance and suggests several entrepreneurial ecosystems – factors are impacting this relationship. The authors extend this line of work by examining how regional entrepreneurial culture, educational institutional support and business and social networks mediating the relationship between entrepreneurs’ decision-making style and small medium enterprises (SME)s’ financial performance.

Design/methodology/approach

The data were collected through an e-survey of SME owners in New South Wales, Australia. This study developed a model combining a set of entrepreneurial ecosystem factors, entrepreneurs’ decision-making styles and SMEs’ financial performance. Data were analysed using partial least square structural equation modelling.

Findings

The results suggest regional entrepreneurial culture, educational institutional support and business and social networks mediate the relationship between entrepreneurs’ decision-making style and SMEs’ financial performance. Hence, this study developed a more complete methodical understanding of entrepreneurs’ decision-making styles and their impact on SMEs’ financial performance. This study provides deeper insights into the conditions and processes by which an entrepreneurs’ decision-making style impacts SMEs’ financial performance.

Originality/value

The focus of this study was to understand the relationship of entrepreneurs’ decision-making styles on SMEs’ financial performance. The authors identified that the entrepreneurs’ decision-making style positively impacts SMEs’ financial performance. This study augments the body of knowledge by proposing ways in how the entrepreneurs’ decision-making style can be more strengthened.

Article
Publication date: 15 October 2021

Gentrit Berisha, Besnik Krasniqi and Rrezon Lajçi

This paper aims to reveal the effects of birth order in decision-making style, conflict handling style and propensity for participative decision-making. The intention is…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to reveal the effects of birth order in decision-making style, conflict handling style and propensity for participative decision-making. The intention is to open the perspective of birth order research in organizational studies, as an important individual difference of managers.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was conducted with 230 managers from different industries in Kosovo. Self-report measures were used for decision-making style, conflict handling style and participatory decision-making constructs.

Findings

Results indicate that only children are more avoidant and spontaneous decision-makers. Firstborns are rational in decision-making and prefer problem-solving in conflict handling. Middleborns are intuitive decision-makers and use compromising in conflict handling. Lastborns make decisions rationally and use both compromising and problem-solving in conflicting situations. In addition, lastborns appeared to have a more positive attitude toward participative decision-making, followed by middleborns, firstborns and only children.

Research limitations/implications

Birth order affects managers’ behaviors in decision-making and conflict situations. Relationship dynamics in sibships are reflected in organizational settings, affecting how people behave in decision-making and conflict handling.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study to attest how birth order influences the ways managers make decisions, handle conflicts and involve others in decision-making. As birth order cannot be changed, such knowledge is critical.

Article
Publication date: 14 November 2017

Gihani S. Rajapakse and K. Kiran

The purpose of this paper is to explore succession planning in academic libraries, specifically to understand how succession planning is carried out and how the decisions

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore succession planning in academic libraries, specifically to understand how succession planning is carried out and how the decisions-making styles of library managers influence each stage of the succession planning.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative approach was used to gather data through a document analysis and interviews with library managers at four Sri Lankan university libraries. Data analysis was done applying the framework analysis (FA) tool.

Findings

The study revealed that succession planning has been practiced in Sri Lankan university libraries to develop a bench strength, skilled backup for key positions at all levels, while inculcating leadership competencies in their respective positions. The dominant decision style is the identifiable decision-making style within the succession planning process.

Research limitations/implications

The volume of the data obtained depends largely on the participants’ responses, and the interpretation of the data is subjected to minimum personal biasness of the researcher.

Practical implications

An understanding of how decision-making styles influence practices of succession planning contributes to assist library managers to carry out succession planning within the limitations of their autonomy to do so. The findings of this study benefit library managers in recognizing their own decision-making styles and the level of succession planning they have achieved.

Social implications

Library managers’ decision-making style can have an influence on how succession planning is carried out successfully at an academic library to ensure continuity of the library’s mission and vision.

Originality/value

This is the first known study to investigate how decision-making style of the manager influences each level of the succession planning at an academic library. The use of a systematic FA method for the qualitative data analysis reveals trustworthy results.

Details

Library Management, vol. 38 no. 8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 1998

Darwish A. Yousef

This study focuses primarily on exploring the role of organizational culture and level of technology used in the organization as predictors of decision‐making styles in a…

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Abstract

This study focuses primarily on exploring the role of organizational culture and level of technology used in the organization as predictors of decision‐making styles in a non‐western country, the United Arab Emirates. Results suggest that organizational culture, and level of technology used in the organization in addition to decision‐maker’s education and management levels are good predictors of decision‐making styles in such an environment. Results also indicate that a tendency towards the participative style prevails among Arab, young, middle management and highly educated managers.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 19 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

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