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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2022

Xin Kuang, Bifeng Yin, Jian Wang, Hekun Jia and Bo Xu

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the dispersion stability and the wear properties of lubricating oil blends added with modified nanometer cerium oxide (CeO2) at…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the dispersion stability and the wear properties of lubricating oil blends added with modified nanometer cerium oxide (CeO2) at high temperature.

Design/methodology/approach

In this paper, CeO2 was self-made and it was chemically modified. The dispersion stability of CeO2 in lubricating oil was studied. And the wear test of lubricating oil blends added with modified CeO2 was carried out at high temperature.

Findings

The results showed that CeO2 was successfully modified by oleic acid and stearic acid. The dispersion stability of modified CeO2 in lubricating oil was improved. Adding modified nano-CeO2 with the concentration less than 50 ppm into the lubricating oil can improve the wear properties of friction pairs in different extent. With the increase of the amount of CeO2, the wear properties increased first and then decreased. The lubricating oil blend added with 25 ppm CeO2 has the best wear properties.

Originality/value

The raw material CeO2 in this paper is self-made and its shape and size are well controlled. Research on the addition of nano-CeO2 to the engine low viscosity finished lubricants is lacking. It is of great significance to study the dispersion stability and tribological properties of nano-lubricants under the new background of low viscosity of lubricating oil and close to the real engine working conditions. It has certain significance to promote the development of nano-lubricants for engines.

Details

Industrial Lubrication and Tribology, vol. 74 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0036-8792

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 19 March 2018

Naseem Ahamed and Nitya Nand Tripathi

Change of leadership is a big and important incident in the life of a company. As important as it is for the company, it is equally a difficult decision to make for the…

Abstract

Change of leadership is a big and important incident in the life of a company. As important as it is for the company, it is equally a difficult decision to make for the board of directors. Most of the big companies have a committee dedicated toward laying out a succession plan of the existing chief executive officer (CEO). The big dilemma, however, is whether to appoint someone from within the company and let him or her lead as he or she has been associated with the company and knows the internal dynamics better or to induct some outsider and take advantage of his or her expertise/reputation in the market. The balance appears lopsided when the result of this chapter is perused. Companies on an average seem to reap more benefits if an existing executive is promoted to the office of CEO rather than hiring an outsider. The benefits which are talked here from promoting insiders are indirect ones and do not have a direct bearing with the finances of the company. As shown by the results that insiders are more likely to continue with the company for a longer duration as the CEO as well as not as the CEO which defers the hiring and firing costs (screening candidates, conducting interviews, huge severance packages, golden parachutes, etc., are the costs referred to) for a longer period. Other benefits arising from insider CEOs are upfront awareness about the company’s work culture, production/service capacity, efficiency, strategies followed till date, etc., which gives him or her a head start compared to an outsider.

Details

Global Tensions in Financial Markets
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-839-0

Keywords

Abstract

Details

The Theory and Practice of Directors’ Remuneration
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-683-0

Book part
Publication date: 1 November 2008

Atreya Chakraborty and Shahbaz Sheikh

This study investigates the impact of corporate governance mechanisms on performance related turnover. Our results indicate that smaller boards and institutional block…

Abstract

This study investigates the impact of corporate governance mechanisms on performance related turnover. Our results indicate that smaller boards and institutional block holders are positively related to the likelihood of performance related turnover. CEOs that also hold the position of the chairman of the board or belong to a founding family face lower likelihood of turnover. CEO stock ownership is negatively related to turnover and CEOs who own 3 percent or more of their company stock face a significantly lower likelihood of performance related turnover. Moreover, protection from external control market has no effect either on the likelihood of turnover.

Details

Institutional Approach to Global Corporate Governance: Business Systems and Beyond
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-320-0

Article
Publication date: 28 February 2022

Clinton Longenecker and Jenell Lynn-Senter Wittmer

This study answers the question, “What are the learning experiences and drivers that provide CEOs with the knowledge, skills, and abilities that will allow them to lead…

104

Abstract

Purpose

This study answers the question, “What are the learning experiences and drivers that provide CEOs with the knowledge, skills, and abilities that will allow them to lead their enterprises through crises?”

Design/methodology/approach

Thirty chief executive officer (CEO) interviews were conducted with two trained interviewers that lasted an average of 76 min. These interviews covered CEO experiences in challenges faced, adaptation, learning and lessons gleaned during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Findings

The interview responses were content analyzed to provide ten main drivers of CEO learning during the pandemic.

Originality/value

The size and scope of the pandemic provides for lessons on leadership learning never experienced before. This study provides in-depth insights from CEO experiences during the pandemic.

Details

Strategic HR Review, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1475-4398

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 August 2021

Thomas Covington, Steve Swidler and Keven Yost

The previous literature finds evidence from birth dates of CEOs that the relative-age effect continually influences their career success. The authors look at a…

Abstract

Purpose

The previous literature finds evidence from birth dates of CEOs that the relative-age effect continually influences their career success. The authors look at a significantly larger collection of CEOs and more exact information on school cut-off dates to reexamine the relative-age effect.

Design/methodology/approach

The relative-age effect suggests that older individuals within a cohort are more successful. This study investigates if the relative-age effect exists for CEOs in the S&P 1500 by analyzing the distribution of their relative age. The authors utilize an identification strategy that allows to calculate a CEO's relative age in months and enables to resolve known identification problems.

Findings

The authors find no support for the existence of the relative-age effect for CEOs either by season of birth or relative age in months. On the whole, the distribution of CEO birth dates is similar to the US population. Additionally, the authors find no evidence of a relative-age effect on firm performance.

Practical implications

Contrary to previous findings, there appears to be no relative-age cohort effect for CEOs of major corporations.

Originality/value

Research shows that CEO characteristics shape firm strategy that in turn affects firm performance. Despite previous work that suggests a relative-age effect, the authors provide a more comprehensive data set and better measurement of relative-age within a cohort. The authors find that the relative-age effect does not continue throughout a CEO's career, and therefore, birth dates are not a characteristic that influences firm strategy and performance.

Details

Managerial Finance, vol. 48 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4358

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 August 2022

Fernando Maciel Ramos, Letícia Gomes Locatelli, Graça Azevedo and Cristiano Machado Costa

Social factors can shape economic decisions. Corporate governance (CG) studies and guidelines usually neglect that the chief executive officer (CEO) and board members may…

Abstract

Purpose

Social factors can shape economic decisions. Corporate governance (CG) studies and guidelines usually neglect that the chief executive officer (CEO) and board members may be socially tied. This study investigates the effects of social ties between the CEO and board members on earnings management (EM).

Design/methodology/approach

The authors run a series of regressions using a sample of Brazilian companies listed on the Brazilian Stock Exchange [B]³ between 2011 and 2017 to assess the effect of the social ties between the CEO and board members on EM using a social ties index. The authors also employ five robustness tests to verify the consistency of results, including alternative proxies of EM and social ties and an estimation using fixed effects.

Findings

After developing and computing a social ties index between the CEOs and members of the board of directors (BD) and the fiscal council (FC), the study’s findings indicate that a significant level of social ties between the CEO and BD has a negative impact on EM. However, for FC members, the authors found non-significant results.

Originality/value

Unlike previous studies, the authors built a social tie index (STI) from five elements of social ties assessed in an environment with a two-tier board system. Results show that elements of social interactions and personal relationships can benefit the company, as a CEO's level of social ties with the BD reduces EM practices.

Details

Journal of Accounting in Emerging Economies, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-1168

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 August 2022

Jieyu Zhou, Mengmeng Bu and Liangding Jia

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how CEO humility influences inter-firm collaboration (IFC) and the moderating roles of firm status (a firm's relative position…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate how CEO humility influences inter-firm collaboration (IFC) and the moderating roles of firm status (a firm's relative position in a social order) and environmental uncertainty on such an effect.

Design/methodology/approach

As the firms were nested in township clusters, the theoretical model was tested using hierarchical linear modeling to analyze a multisource and multilevel onsite survey from 254 firms in Chinese township clusters. CEO humility was measured using an 18-item scale reported by both the human resource managers and the financial managers. Besides using CEO self-reported ratings as the measurement of IFC, this study employed additional measurements to further validate the findings, including the IFC reported by the administrative managers and two alternative measures for IFC reported by both CEO and the administrative managers of each firm.

Findings

This study found that CEO humility is positively related to IFC (H1), and that this association is marginally more salient when firms have high status (H2) but less salient when firms face a high level of environmental uncertainty (H3).

Practical implications

Findings suggest that firms with humble CEOs may benefit from better inter-firm collaborative relationships, especially when firms have high status (i.e. possess many well-known trademarks), but not when they are in an uncertain environment.

Originality/value

Previous humility studies focused on the influence of leader humility on individual and team outcomes, but little attention has been paid to organizational outcomes. This research extends the implications of leader humility to inter-firm relationships. Moreover, this paper explores the boundary conditions of the influence of CEO humility, thus advancing the contextual understanding of leader humility.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 August 2022

Mohammed W.A. Saleh, Derar Eleyan and Zaharaddeen Salisu Maigoshi

This study examines the impact of institutional ownership (IO) on firm performance. It also investigates whether powerful CEOs using a “CEO score index” moderate IO and…

Abstract

Purpose

This study examines the impact of institutional ownership (IO) on firm performance. It also investigates whether powerful CEOs using a “CEO score index” moderate IO and firm performance nexus by drawing on insights from the agency and resource dependency theories.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were obtained from annual reports of companies listed on the Palestine Security Exchange from 2009 to 2019. Panel data regressions were conducted based on 528 observations. In addition, this study repeated the analysis using a one-step generalized method of moments (GMM) and two-stage least squares analysis to deal with the endogeneity issue.

Findings

Results show that IO and CEO power is positively associated with firm performance. Besides, it has been established that CEO power strengthens the relationship between IO and performance. Thus, this can be summarized that IO improves firm performance; however, with the powerful CEO intervention, the performance will improve even more.

Originality/value

Studying IO is timely given since the type of ownership is paramount to identify which form of a high degree of ownership affects the performance negatively, especially, in the Palestine environment which is dominated by institutional investors. This is of great importance to the investors as it will enable them to identify the type of firms to which they can commit their funds, and which firm excels through the CEO power. Besides, the inconsistency results in previous literature on IO, and firm performance indicates that there is an indirect effect that needs alternative explanations.

Details

EuroMed Journal of Business, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1450-2194

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 July 2021

Haynes Cooney, Peter Korsten and Anthony Marshall

The recent IBM Institute for Business Value CEO survey of 3,000 chief executives globally offers insight into CEO attitudes and behaviors in order to discern the…

Abstract

Purpose

The recent IBM Institute for Business Value CEO survey of 3,000 chief executives globally offers insight into CEO attitudes and behaviors in order to discern the strategies and actions most highly correlated to successful digital transformation and performance.

Design/methodology/approach

The IBM Institute for Business Value, in collaboration with the Oxford Economics, surveyed 3,000 CEOs and senior public sector executives between September and November 2020. The analysis identified a group of CEOs whose outlook on transformation and success with digital implementation sets them apart from others.

Findings

These Dynamic CEOs, who represent 38 percent of all commercial leaders in the IBM IBV research, shared two crucial insights: that traditional business models no longer differentiate their organizations; their organization?s digital transformation journey will never be complete.

Practical/implications

These Dynamic CEOs are almost 70 percent more likely to lead high performing organizations than other top leaders.

Originality/value

Almost 90 percent of Dynamic CEOs expect their business and IT investments to deliver a material improvement in business performance over the next three years, with the greatest emphasis on investments in customer experience improvement, decision-making processes and business agility.

Details

Strategy & Leadership, vol. 49 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1087-8572

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