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Article
Publication date: 5 January 2021

Merideth Thompson, Dawn S. Carlson and K. Michele Kacmar

The authors examine a boundary management tactic for managing the work–family interface: putting family first (PFF). PFF is a boundary management tactic defined as the voluntary…

Abstract

Purpose

The authors examine a boundary management tactic for managing the work–family interface: putting family first (PFF). PFF is a boundary management tactic defined as the voluntary behavior of intentionally putting family obligations ahead of work obligations in a way that violates organizational norms

Design/methodology/approach

In Study 1, The authors develop a theoretically derived measure of PFF and distinguish it theoretically and empirically from similar existing constructs, examining convergent and discriminate validity to demonstrate its uniqueness. In Study 2, the authors demonstrate PFF's predictive validity beyond the job incumbent using a three-way matched sample of 226 individuals, including the job incumbent's coworker and spouse.

Findings

The authors established and validated a measure of PFF, developing and replicating the nomological network. PFF crossed over to positively relate to coworker role overload, job frustration and work–family conflict and to spousal stress transmission and relationship tension. Similarly, PFF related negatively to spousal family satisfaction and organizational commitment.

Originality/value

The authors extend the work–family and boundary management literatures by proposing a new form of boundary management, PFF, which is a tactic for managing the work–family interface, and explore how its use influences not only the job incumbent but also the coworker and the spouse.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 26 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 February 2019

Dawn S. Carlson, K. Michele Kacmar, Merideth J. Thompson and Martha C. Andrews

The purpose of this paper is to examine the role of four impression management (IM) tactics as mediators to help job incumbents manage the impressions others have regarding the…

1408

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the role of four impression management (IM) tactics as mediators to help job incumbents manage the impressions others have regarding the spillover of the incumbent’s family domain onto the work domain.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors examined the data from 296 matched job incumbents and coworkers. The authors tested a structural equation model and alternative models to find the best fit and subsequently tested both direct and indirect effects.

Findings

The authors found that family-to-work conflict related to job-focused and supervisor-focused IM behaviors, and family-to-work enrichment related to self-focused, coworker-focused and supervisor-focused IM behaviors. Supervisor-focused IM served as a mediator to the job incumbent’s attitude (job satisfaction) while job-focused, self-focused and coworker-focused IM served as mediators to the job incumbent’s behavior (job performance).

Practical implications

The research is important in that just as employees do not “leave work at the office,” they also do not “leave family at home.” Instead, experiences in the two domains affect one another in ways that are beneficial and harmful. Understanding the role that IM plays in this process adds insight into the spillover of family onto work.

Originality/value

The authors extend both the work-family and IM literatures by looking at potential family domain antecedents to engaging in IM behaviors and their impact on work life.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 34 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 May 2021

Kenneth J. Harris, Ranida B. Harris, Matthew Valle, John Carlson, Dawn S. Carlson, Suzanne Zivnuska and Briceön Wiley

The purpose of this study is to understand the impact of techno-overload and techno-invasion on work and family. Specifically, we focus on intention to turnover in the work…

2319

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to understand the impact of techno-overload and techno-invasion on work and family. Specifically, we focus on intention to turnover in the work domain, work-family conflict in the work-family domain, and family burnout in the family domain. Furthermore, this study examines the moderating role of entitlement, a personality variable, in this process.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a sample of 253 people who were using technology to complete their work over two time periods, the relationships were examined using hierarchical moderated regression analysis.

Findings

The results revealed that both techno-overload and techno-invasion were significantly related to greater turnover intentions, higher work-family conflict, and greater family burnout. In addition, entitlement played a moderating role such that those who were higher in entitlement had stronger techno-overload-outcome and technostress invasion-outcome relationships.

Practical implications

These findings may provide managers key insights to help manage employees, especially those with an inflated sense of entitlement, to mitigate the serious negative outcomes associated with techno-overload and techno-invasion. In particular, both techno- overload and techno-invasion had minimal impact on negative outcomes when employee entitlement was lower. However, when employee entitlement was higher, techno-overload and techno-invasion had considerable negative effects.

Originality/value

Due to the ubiquitous nature of information-communication technology (ICT) in organizations today, individuals often experience techno-overload and techno-invasion. This research utilized conservation of resources theory to examine these relationships. This study established the relationships of both techno-overload and techno-invasion with key organizational and family outcomes and points to the critical role of the personality variable, entitlement, in this process. The results provide theoretical and practical advancement in the role of technology with people in organizations today.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 35 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 May 2010

Dawn S. Carlson, Joseph G. Grzywacz and K. Michele Kacmar

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship of schedule flexibility with performance and satisfaction in the work and family domains, and whether these associations…

7806

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship of schedule flexibility with performance and satisfaction in the work and family domains, and whether these associations are mediated by the work‐family interface. Possible gender differences in the putative benefits of schedule flexibility are also to be explored.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a sample of 607 full‐time employees in either schedule flexibility or traditional working arrangements the authors tested a moderated‐mediation model. Regression was used to test the mediation of work‐family and the moderation of gender to the schedule flexibility to work‐family path.

Findings

Both work‐to‐family conflict and work‐to‐family enrichment are mediating mechanisms in the relationship of schedule flexibility with outcomes. More specifically, full mediation was found for job satisfaction and family performance for both enrichment and conflict while partial mediation was found for family satisfaction with enrichment only and mediation was not supported for job performance. Finally, gender moderated the schedule flexibility to work‐family conflict relationship such that women benefited more from flexible working arrangements than men.

Originality/value

The paper adds value by examining a mediation mechanism in the schedule flexibility with the outcome relationship of the work‐family interface. It also adds value by including work‐family enrichment which is a key variable but has little research. Finally, it adds value by demonstrating that schedule flexibility plays a stronger role for women than men regarding the work‐family interface.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 25 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 May 2016

Suzanne Zivnuska, K. Michele Kacmar, Merideth Ferguson and Dawn S. Carlson

Mindfulness is a well-studied phenomenon in many disciplines. Little is known about its impacts on employees at work. The purpose of this paper is to focus on mindfulness at work…

6246

Abstract

Purpose

Mindfulness is a well-studied phenomenon in many disciplines. Little is known about its impacts on employees at work. The purpose of this paper is to focus on mindfulness at work, defined as a psychological state in which employees intentionally pay full attention to the present moment while executing job tasks. The research model, grounded in conservation of resources theory, depicts how mindfulness at work may help employees develop resources (work-family balance and job engagement) which may be associated with greater well-being (less psychological distress and more job satisfaction) and organizational attitudes (intent to turnover and affective commitment).

Design/methodology/approach

Using a sample of 503 full time employees, the authors test the model with structural equation modeling.

Findings

Results supported the full research model, suggesting that mindfulness at work is an important antecedent to resource accrual, well-being, and organizational attitudes. Mindfulness at work exerted direct and indirect effects on turnover intentions and affective commitment.

Research limitations/implications

The inclusion of job engagement as a mediator provides an interesting counterpoint and extension of prior studies suggesting that job engagement negates the effects of mindfulness on turnover intentions (Dane, 2014).

Practical implications

The research suggests that mindfulness at work is highly trainable and may enhance a variety of career outcomes.

Originality/value

This study extends emerging literature on mindfulness at work by offering a new scale grounded in established theory and the practice of mindfulness.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2003

Denise M. Rotondo, Dawn S. Carlson and Joel F. Kincaid

One way to reduce work‐family conflict is for individuals to have the ability to effectively cope with the stressful demands. The relationships between four styles of work and…

7388

Abstract

One way to reduce work‐family conflict is for individuals to have the ability to effectively cope with the stressful demands. The relationships between four styles of work and family coping (direct action, help‐seeking, positive thinking, and avoidance/resignation) and levels of work‐family conflict are considered. Two different forms of work‐family conflict (time‐based and strain‐based) were examined as well as the effect of direction (work interfering with family, family interfering with work) to examine the efficacy of different coping styles. Help‐seeking and direct action coping used at home were associated with lower family interfering with work conflict levels. Avoidance/resignation coping was associated with higher conflict levels of all types. The results suggest individuals may have greater control and opportunity for positive change within the family domain compared with the work environment.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 32 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1995

Dawn S. Carlson, K. Michele Kacmar and Lee P. Stepina

The part played by time in exacerbating work‐family conflict haslong been recognized. Recently, however, researchers have argued thatthe degree of identification one receives from…

2407

Abstract

The part played by time in exacerbating work‐family conflict has long been recognized. Recently, however, researchers have argued that the degree of identification one receives from work and family is also important. While direct effects of both of these sources of work‐family conflict have been found, the trend is not constant. Hence, time and identity alone may not be sufficient to explain work‐family conflict. Proposes and tests an interactive effect for these two antecedents of work‐family conflict in order to understand and explain the phenomenon better.

Details

Women in Management Review, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-9425

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 17 June 2021

The authors say they invented a new construct of putting family first (PFF). They define PFF as “the voluntary behavior of intentionally putting one’s family ahead of work in a…

Abstract

Purpose

The authors say they invented a new construct of putting family first (PFF). They define PFF as “the voluntary behavior of intentionally putting one’s family ahead of work in a way that violates organisational norms”. They said it helped to understand how workers break rules to manage boundary conflicts. They wanted to test the impact on co-workers and spouses.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors carried out two studies. The first one established a scale to measure PFF. The second one tested for links between PFF and both co-workers frustration and spousal dissatisfaction. To test their theories, the authors looked for US workers with spouses and co-workers.

Findings

Results showed PFF correlated significantly with the co-workers’ feelings of overload, frustration with work and work-family conflict. It also correlated significantly with the spouses’ stress transmission and relationship tensions. The results provided further validity of the scale developed in Study 1, as well as demonstrating the wider repercussions of PFF.

Originality/value

Results showed PFF correlated significantly with the co-workers’ feelings of overload, frustration with work and work-family conflict. It also correlated significantly with the spouses’ stress transmission and relationship tensions. The results provided further validity of the scale developed in Study 1, as well as demonstrating the wider repercussions of PFF.

Details

Human Resource Management International Digest , vol. 29 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-0734

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 1 July 2005

Jeremy Reynolds and Linda A. Renzulli

This paper uses a representative sample of U.S. workers to examine how self-employment may reduce work-life conflict. We find that self-employment prevents work from interfering…

Abstract

This paper uses a representative sample of U.S. workers to examine how self-employment may reduce work-life conflict. We find that self-employment prevents work from interfering with life (WIL), especially among women, but it heightens the tendency for life to interfere with work (LIW). We show that self-employment is connected to WIL and LIW by different causal mechanisms. The self-employed experience less WIL because they have more autonomy and control over the duration and timing of work. Working at home is the most important reason the self-employed experience more LIW than wage and salary workers.

Details

Entrepreneurship
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-191-0

Book part
Publication date: 17 September 2020

Dawn Iacobucci, Marcelo L. D. S. Gabriel, Matthew J. Schneider and Kavita Miadaira Hamza

This chapter reviews marketing scholarship on environmental sustainability. The literature covers several themes of both consumer behavior and firm-level topics. Consumer issues…

Abstract

This chapter reviews marketing scholarship on environmental sustainability. The literature covers several themes of both consumer behavior and firm-level topics. Consumer issues include their assessment of efficacy and the extent to which they are aware and sensitive to environmental issues. Numerous interventions and marketing appeals for modifying attitudes and behaviors have been tested and are reported. Consumers and business managers have both been queried regarding attitudes of recycling and waste. Firm-level phenomena are reflected, including how brand managers can signal their green efforts to their customers, whether doing so is beneficial, all in conjunction with macro pressures or constraints from industry or governmental agencies. This chapter closes with a reflection on the research.

Details

Continuing to Broaden the Marketing Concept
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-824-4

Keywords

1 – 10 of 159