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Article
Publication date: 3 October 2017

Mahesh Subramony, Karen Ehrhart, Markus Groth, Brooks C. Holtom, Danielle D. van Jaarsveld, Dana Yagil, Tiffany Darabi, David Walker, David E. Bowen, Raymond P. Fisk, Christian Grönroos and Jochen Wirtz

The purpose of this paper is to accelerate research related to the employee-facets of service management by summarizing current developments in multiple research streams…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to accelerate research related to the employee-facets of service management by summarizing current developments in multiple research streams, providing propositions, and articulating new directions for theory and empirical inquiry.

Design/methodology/approach

Seven scholars provide short reviews of the core topics and findings from four employee-related research streams – collective turnover, service climate, emotional labor, and occupational stress; and generate propositions to guide future theoretical and empirical work. Four distinguished service scholars – David Bowen, Ray Fisk, Christian Grönroos, and Jochen Wirtz comment upon these research streams and provide future directions for accelerating employee-related research in service management.

Findings

All four research-streams yield insights that have the potential to advance service management research. Commentaries from the distinguished scholars further integrate this work with key concerns within service management including technology-enablement, transformative services, and service strategy.

Originality/value

This paper is unique in its scope of coverage of management topics related to service and its aim to promote interdisciplinary dialog between service management scholars and researchers conducting employee-related research relevant to services.

Details

Journal of Service Management, vol. 28 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-5818

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 14 June 2021

Iddo Gal, Dana Yagil and Gil Luria

The purpose of this paper is to contribute to the literature on service quality and value co-creation and co-destruction by unpacking the phenomenon described as…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to contribute to the literature on service quality and value co-creation and co-destruction by unpacking the phenomenon described as “difficult customers”, which has many associated costs for service organizations. The paper examines how frontline service employees make sense of and react to client behaviors that disrupt service processes.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a qualitative study with 128 frontline workers, who were interviewed about their perceptions, explanations and reactions to problem-related customers, using a sensemaking perspective.

Findings

Content analysis revealed 17 themes related to workers' perceptions, explanations and reactions to problem-related customers. Workers classify behaviors of problem-related customers in terms exceeding the single notion of intentionality that dominates the literature, instead referring to the degree of both controllability and malevolence of customers. Service workers choose a wide range of behavioral reactions that have not been studied before.

Research limitations/implications

A convenience sample, although large, limits generalizability. Suggestions for future quantitative research are proposed.

Practical implications

Based on the findings, the authors suggest specific directions related to managerial policy and organizational practices related to training and employee empowerment and service recovery routines.

Originality/value

The study introduces a new theoretical notion of “problem-related customers”, set within a value co-creation context. It presents findings that enable deeper understanding of the emotional and behavioral reactions of frontline workers to service disruptions and offers multiple scholarly contributions, new research directions and managerial insights that can help to improve service recovery and service quality

Details

International Journal of Quality and Service Sciences, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-669X

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Article
Publication date: 8 May 2017

Dana Yagil and Tamar Shultz

Service employees are frequently exposed to moral dilemmas as a result of their boundary role, attending to the interests of both the organization and customers. The…

Abstract

Purpose

Service employees are frequently exposed to moral dilemmas as a result of their boundary role, attending to the interests of both the organization and customers. The purpose of this paper is to explore organizational and personal values that generate moral dilemmas in the service context, as well as emotions related to employees’ moral decisions.

Design/methodology/approach

Using the critical incidents technique, data were collected from service providers about moral dilemmas in the workplace. The data were analyzed independently by each author, with an agreement rate of 84-88 percent.

Findings

The results show that service employees confront dilemmas as a result of conflicts between the following organizational and personal values: standardization vs personalization; profit vs integrity; and emotional display rules vs dignity. Moral decision making involves emotions generated by customer distress, negative emotions toward customers, and emotions of guilt, shame, or fear.

Originality/value

Little research has studied moral conflicts in service encounters from employees’ perspective. Using a qualitative approach, this study explores the role of personal values and moral emotions in such processes.

Details

Journal of Service Theory and Practice, vol. 27 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2055-6225

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 17 September 2018

Mahesh Subramony, David Solnet, Markus Groth, Dana Yagil, Nicole Hartley, Peter Beomcheol Kim and Maria Golubovskaya

The purpose of this paper is to explore the changing nature of the relationship between service workers and their work arrangements. Building upon classical and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the changing nature of the relationship between service workers and their work arrangements. Building upon classical and contemporary management theories and examining current trends and disruptions in employment relationships, it proposes a dynamic and relational model applicable to the management of service work in future decades (notionally in the year 2050).

Design/methodology/approach

This paper introduces and develops the concept of worker–ecosystem relationship as a core construct to describe the participation and productivity of workers in the significantly transformed work environment of 2050.

Findings

This paper argues that in work ecosystems – defined as relatively self-contained and self-adjusting systems – work arrangements will evolve toward less-clearly defined employment relationships characterized by long-term social contracts, tightly defined work roles and physical proximity of workers and organizations.

Originality/value

A novel yet theoretically rooted construct of work ecosystems is introduced, using this new lens to predict changes in the nature of service work in 2050.

Details

Journal of Service Management, vol. 29 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-5818

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2005

Dana Yagil

This two‐part research project examines self‐serving attributions by employees in reaction to supervisor's negative interpersonal behaviors in the workplace. The first…

Abstract

This two‐part research project examines self‐serving attributions by employees in reaction to supervisor's negative interpersonal behaviors in the workplace. The first study (N = 289) examined internal and external attributions in reaction to negative supervisor's behaviors compared to positive behaviors, and the moderating effect of organizational empowerment. The respondents attributed positive behaviors internally and negative behaviors externally. However, empowerment did not affect the attributions. The second study (N = 252,) examined the relationship of attributions of blame to the victim in relation to being the victim of negative behaviors as compared to being the perpetrator. Again, negative supervisor's behaviors were related to attribution of blame to factors external to the victim. However, the employee's own negative behaviors were positively related to attribution of blame to the victim.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2006

Dana Yagil

The study examined respective perceptions of justice within leader-employee dyads. Questionnaires were administered to 152 such dyads in a variety of organizational…

Abstract

The study examined respective perceptions of justice within leader-employee dyads. Questionnaires were administered to 152 such dyads in a variety of organizational settings. Employees’ perceptions of interactional justice were found to mediate the relationship between the leader’s evaluation of the relationship (i.e., equity and the quality of the relationship), on the one hand, and the employee’s evaluation of the relationship and perception of procedural justice, on the other. Both procedural justice and interactional justice were related to job satisfaction through a partial mediation of the employee’s perception of the quality of the relationship. The results are discussed in regard to the effect of the leader-member social exchange on perceptions of justice

Details

International Journal of Organization Theory & Behavior, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1093-4537

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2005

Helena Syna Desivilya and Dana Yagil

The current study aims to identify the factors underlying differing preferences for conflict‐management patterns within work teams. Two major antecedents of dispute…

Abstract

The current study aims to identify the factors underlying differing preferences for conflict‐management patterns within work teams. Two major antecedents of dispute resolution modes were examined: the team members' emotional reactions to and their perceptions of the type of conflicts encountered in their work group. The sample consisted of 69 medical teams, comprising 331 employees (nurses and physicians) employed in several medical organizations. Self‐report structured questionnaires were used to assess the research variables. A series of regression analyses showed that cooperative (integrating and compromising) patterns of conflict management were associated with positive intragroup emotional states; contentious (dominating) patterns were associated with positive as well as negative emotions; and an avoidance pattern was associated with negative emotions only. Additionally, negative emotions were found to mediate the association of relationship conflict with a dominating pattern of conflict management. The findings point to the centrality of emotional states in determining conflict management preferences at the intragroup level.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

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Article
Publication date: 9 October 2009

Dana Yagil and Hasida Ben‐Zur

The purpose of this paper is to explore the role of self‐serving attributions by service providers in reaction to customers' perceived negative and positive behaviors.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the role of self‐serving attributions by service providers in reaction to customers' perceived negative and positive behaviors.

Design/methodology/approach

Questionnaires are completed by 398 service providers.

Findings

The hypotheses, supported by the results, are that service providers would make more external attributions of negative customer behaviors and more internal attributions of positive behaviors. However, the external attributions of negative behaviors are expected to be positively related to burnout because it conflicts with the organizational message regarding the customer's rights. Attributions are found to mediate the relationship between frequency of customers' behaviors and burnout. Empowerment is positively related to internal attributions of both positive and negative behaviors.

Research limitations/implications

The study is conducted with a convenience sample and does not represent a broad spectrum of the service sector. Customers positive and negative behaviors are explored through respondents' self‐reports. Furthermore, the service encounters, namely a one‐time service interaction or a long‐term service relationship are not differentiated.

Practical implications

Self‐serving attributions made by employees do not always accord to managerial policy. In order to minimize the conflict between the organizational notion of the customer's rights and service provider's self‐serving attributions, management must make a clear distinction between customer negative behaviors and service failure. While service providers should assume responsibility for correcting failures, they should not be blamed for customer negative behaviors. Furthermore, management should encourage the internal attribution of positive customer behaviors.

Originality/value

While in most contexts the attribution of negative events externally is found to have a positive effect, the effect of such attribution in the service context is not obvious. The notion of the customer being always right suggests that in the case of a conflict, the service provider is wrong by default. Making external attributions of negative customer behaviors conflicts with organizational standards as well as creates a gap between the service provider's external behavior and his/her internal state. The research question addresses the mediating role of such attributions in the relationship of the frequency of customers' behaviors and service providers' burnout. In additon, to address this issue more fully, the scope of customer behavior beyond the adverse behaviors examined in previous studies is broaden.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 17 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2002

Dana Yagil

The study examined three models that suggested direct, mediated, and moderated relationships among personality and situational variables relating to the service provider…

Abstract

The study examined three models that suggested direct, mediated, and moderated relationships among personality and situational variables relating to the service provider and customer satisfaction. Questionnaires were administered to 151 service provider‐customer dyads. The results support the model describing a mediation by job‐related control of the relationship between organizational variables relating to the service provider, on the one hand, and customer satisfaction, on the other. The service provider’s trait control was found to contribute to the prediction of job‐related control over and above the contribution of the organizational variables. Trait control moderates the relationship between empowering leadership and job‐related control, such that the relationship is significant only when trait control is low.

Details

International Journal of Service Industry Management, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-4233

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 10 October 2008

Dana Yagil, Gil Luria and Iddo Gal

The purpose of this study is to explore the role of core self‐evaluations (CSE) as a coping resource in customer service roles.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to explore the role of core self‐evaluations (CSE) as a coping resource in customer service roles.

Design/methodology/approach

Questionnaires were administered to 265 service providers, measuring CSE, burnout, social stressors involved in interaction with customers (perceived customer negative behaviors and emotional regulation performed by service providers) and coping resources (service orientation and social support).

Findings

The results show that CSE is negatively related to service provider burnout as reflected in depersonalization and emotional exhaustion, and positively related to a sense of accomplishment. CSE was also negatively related to perceived customer negative behaviors and to emotional regulation. The results show a partial mediation effect of emotional regulation on the relationship between CSE and burnout. Service orientation and social support were found to interact with CSE and enhance its effect on social stressors.

Research limitations/implications

The use of a non‐randomized sample might bias the results.

Practical implications

The results can inform managerial practices designed to enhance service providers' resources of coping with role stressors.

Originality/value

The study introduces a fundamental personality trait, CSE, to the area of service and shows its effect on burnout through its relationship with situational stressors and interaction with coping resources.

Details

International Journal of Service Industry Management, vol. 19 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-4233

Keywords

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