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Article

Fiona Shields and Tom Mullen

Abstract This article looks at the benefits of and obstacles to using a whole systems approach to plan and deliver personality disorder services. It does so using the…

Abstract

Abstract This article looks at the benefits of and obstacles to using a whole systems approach to plan and deliver personality disorder services. It does so using the example of the Leeds Managed Clinical Network, a community pilot service that employs whole system working to support people with personality disorder.

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

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Book part

Laura von Gilsa and Dieter Zapf

This chapter describes the role of service employees’ motives for emotion regulation in interactions with customers. To date, there has been little research and…

Abstract

This chapter describes the role of service employees’ motives for emotion regulation in interactions with customers. To date, there has been little research and theoretical work on motives for emotion regulation in service work. The reason for this may lie in the fact that there is an implicit general assumption that employees regulate their emotions in customer interactions because of display rules given by the organization. We argue that service employees have more motives for emotion regulation than adhering to display rules. We propose that three fundamental motive categories which are relevant for general emotion regulation are also relevant in the service work context. Moreover, we argue that the different motive categories are important antecedents for the further emotion regulation process. We propose that depending on the motive category different emotion regulation strategies are used as well as moderating effects of the motives with an impact on the consequences of emotion regulation such as well-being. The chapter concludes by pointing to practical implications.

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The Role of Emotion and Emotion Regulation in Job Stress and Well Being
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-586-9

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Article

Sergiy Eugene Pogodayev

The purpose of this paper is the justification of a new conception of the marketing of works. The paper supports this new conception of the marketing of goods, works, and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is the justification of a new conception of the marketing of works. The paper supports this new conception of the marketing of goods, works, and services instead of the existing conception of the marketing of goods and services. The paper also introduces new concepts of hybrid offerings.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper develops hypotheses on the basis of a hypothetical-deductive method, the application of analysis and synthesis for justification of the proposed concepts, and interviews with top marketing managers of shipyards to substantiate the necessity of marketing of works.

Findings

Marketing of works is a new line of marketing activity and a source of new hybrid offerings. A widened marketing of goods, works, and services must replace the existing marketing of goods and services, which does not apply completely in the sale of works. The main difference between works and services is an ability to change the market value of objects. “Goods+works” and “works+services” are the new particular hybrid offerings and “goods+works+services” is the new general hybrid offering.

Practical implications

Marketing of works plays a key role in many branches of industry, including house building, airplane production, the repair of vessels, the reclamation of land, and so on. Works are elements of the new hybrid offerings and the new marketing of goods, works, and services.

Originality/value

Initially, the new marketing of works appeared as a part of the marketing of industrial services. Conceptions of the marketing of works and the marketing of goods, works, and services are new results that develop the existing marketing of goods and services. The particular hybrid offerings “goods+works” and “works+services” and the general hybrid offering “goods+works+services” are also new results.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 28 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Article

Jane Parker and James Arrowsmith

The purpose of this paper is to provide contemporary information and analysis of women's location within the service sector of New Zealand; to evaluate the responsiveness…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide contemporary information and analysis of women's location within the service sector of New Zealand; to evaluate the responsiveness of two major policy initiatives designed to ameliorate women's circumstances therein; and to reconceptualise and suggest possible approaches and measures which could inform future government and workplace policy and practice.

Design/methodology/approach

The study primarily employs a thematic analysis of publicly‐available reports, documentation and pertinent academic work. Secondary, independent statistical analyses of nationally‐representative data are used in order to provide the context and rationale for the policy analysis, and to overview key trends and “problem” areas in the service sector for working women in New Zealand.

Findings

New Zealand has a high female labour force participation rate, with more than eight out of 10 female workers employed in service work. Although women remain over‐represented in low‐paid work, they have benefited from service sector growth, higher penetration of professional and managerial work, and some reduction in the gender pay gap. State interventions are justified in equity, labour market and welfare terms, with an emerging focus on “decent work” and productivity. Yet, this analysis of key initiatives for working women reveals an inadequate regulatory and policy framework. The significance and “genderedness” of service work to the economy means that it is increasingly but still insufficiently the focus of economic and social policy.

Originality/value

This study responds to the absence of a contemporary and comprehensive assessment of the location and inequities experienced by different groups of women in New Zealand's service sector, particularly Māori and Pasifika women. It provides a springboard to further analysis of the key trends, themes and policy impacts that it highlights, as well as of a reconceived regulatory approach for women working in the service sector outlined in the Concluding section.

Details

Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, vol. 31 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7149

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Article

Helen Masson, Nick Frost and Nigel Parton

In the context of current developments in children ' s services in the UK and increased emphasis on workforce development, the authors describe a survey of…

Abstract

Purpose

In the context of current developments in children ' s services in the UK and increased emphasis on workforce development, the authors describe a survey of successful completers of a Post-qualifying (PQ) Child Care Award Programme, one of 18 such programmes in England that ran between 2001 and 2006/7. The survey ' s aims were twofold: first, to gather the respondents ' overall evaluations of their PQ training and information about their past and current work circumstances; and second, to explore their knowledge and opinions on the latest developments in children ' s services in relation to their own work practices. The findings from the survey are outlined under four themes, which are then discussed in relation to other relevant studies, reviews on the role and tasks of social workers and current developments associated with the Every Child Matters agenda and the integrated workforce. Concerns are raised about whether social work professionalism is being effectively utilised within the current children ' s services arrangements.

Details

Journal of Children's Services, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-6660

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Article

David Phillips

The main focus of this paper is upon the use of computers and other elements of Information Technology (IT) in the daily practice of social work, specifically in relation…

Abstract

The main focus of this paper is upon the use of computers and other elements of Information Technology (IT) in the daily practice of social work, specifically in relation to the impact which it has upon the service user and the social workers and upon the outcome of service delivery. But it is also necessary to stray into other territories; notably management uses of computing in social work agencies, and to the more abstract area of the relationship between service‐users, social work and society.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 10 no. 4/5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

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Article

Graham Towl

The numbers of psychologists employed in HM Prison Service have doubled in the past three years to over 600 staff. HM Prison Service is the largest single employer of…

Abstract

The numbers of psychologists employed in HM Prison Service have doubled in the past three years to over 600 staff. HM Prison Service is the largest single employer of applied psychologists. With a governmental focus firmly on ‘joined up’ services in the criminal justice field (Boateng, 1999), the launch of the National Probation Service (NPS) in April 2001 has set the scene for closer partnership working between the two organisations. There has not historically been a national structure for the employment of psychologists in the probation service. With the creation of the NPS and an increased emphasis on partnership working, a national integrated role for psychologists is ripe for development. This presents both organisations with some significant partnership challenges and opportunities (Towl, 2000).

Details

The British Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6646

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Book part

Winifred Rebecca Poster

Workplace temporalities are being reshaped under globalization. Some scholars argue that work time is becoming more flexible, de-territorializing, and even disappearing. I…

Abstract

Workplace temporalities are being reshaped under globalization. Some scholars argue that work time is becoming more flexible, de-territorializing, and even disappearing. I provide an alternative picture of what is happening to work time by focusing on the customer service call center industry in India. Through case studies of three firms, and interviews with 80 employees, managers, and officials, I show how this industry involves a “reversal” of work time in which organizations and their employees shift their schedules entirely to the night. Rather than liberation from time, workers experience a hyper-management, rigidification, and re-territorialization of temporalities. This temporal order pervades both the physical and virtual tasks of the job, and has consequences for workers’ health, families, future careers, and the wider community of New Delhi. I argue that this trend is prompted by capital mobility within the information economy, expansion of the service sector, and global inequalities of time, and is reflective of an emerging stratification of employment temporalities across lines of the Global North and South.

Details

Workplace Temporalities
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7623-1268-9

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Book part

Sanjeewa Perera and Carol T. Kulik

Emotion work benefits service organizations, but high emotion-workloads lead to negative consequences for employees. We examined differences between employees highly…

Abstract

Emotion work benefits service organizations, but high emotion-workloads lead to negative consequences for employees. We examined differences between employees highly competent in emotion work (Experts) and those who are less competent (Novices). We found that Novices conformed to organizational level display rules, used simple strategies and felt overwhelmed by their emotion-workload. In contrast, Experts followed interaction level display rules, used proactive strategies, and found emotion work to be effortless. This suggests that emotion work competence can act as a firewall buffering employees from negative consequences. Hospitality organizations can benefit from encouraging employees to increase their emotion work competence.

Details

New Ways of Studying Emotions in Organizations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-220-7

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Book part

Sanjeewa Perera

This chapter investigated tactics used by customer service employees in performing emotion work during their interactions with customers and those internal to…

Abstract

This chapter investigated tactics used by customer service employees in performing emotion work during their interactions with customers and those internal to organizations. Based on a qualitative study in the hospitality industry, I discovered that customer service employees used a range of tactics that impact different phases of the emotion regulation process in order to facilitate emotion work. One group of tactics was directed towards the work context while the other was self-directed in an attempt to regulate the experience and expression of emotion. Taken together these two groups of tactics provide a holistic portrayal of the range of tactics used by customer service employees in performing emotion work.

Details

What Have We Learned? Ten Years On
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-208-1

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