Search results

1 – 10 of over 15000
Article
Publication date: 31 August 2021

Tessa Withorn, Jillian Eslami, Hannah Lee, Maggie Clarke, Carolyn Caffrey, Cristina Springfield, Dana Ospina, Anthony Andora, Amalia Castañeda, Alexandra Mitchell, Joanna Messer Kimmitt, Wendolyn Vermeer and Aric Haas

This paper presents recently published resources on library instruction and information literacy, providing an introductory overview and a selected annotated bibliography…

3141

Abstract

Purpose

This paper presents recently published resources on library instruction and information literacy, providing an introductory overview and a selected annotated bibliography of publications covering various library types, study populations and research contexts.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper introduces and annotates English-language periodical articles, monographs, dissertations, reports and other materials on library instruction and information literacy published in 2020.

Findings

The paper provides a brief description of all 440 sources and highlights sources that contain unique or significant scholarly contributions.

Originality/value

The information may be used by librarians, researchers and anyone interested in a quick and comprehensive reference to literature on library instruction and information literacy.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 49 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 March 2016

Sonja Spiranec, Mihaela Banek Zorica and Denis Kos

The purpose of this paper is to make a contribution to the theoretical and pragmatic positioning of critical information literacy by interpreting it in the light of…

2546

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to make a contribution to the theoretical and pragmatic positioning of critical information literacy by interpreting it in the light of epistemological shifts brought about by Web 2.0. Epistemological shifts are elaborated from educational and institutional perspectives as well as from that of scientific research.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper brings a theoretical analysis drawing on relevant literature for the purpose of identifying the grounds for the mapping of concepts associated with critical information literacy and participatory information environments. Based on descriptive analysis, the paper clarifies distinctions between/participatory/and /information bank/environments and identifies correlations existing between CIL and participatory information environments.

Findings

There are conceptual disagreements between IL as it was defined and perceived by Zurkowski and how it has to be perceived in the context of contemporary participatory information environments. Current environments are congruent with the core principles and values of critical information literacy and call for the reshaping of IL by introducing into it critical and transformative elements. Not technological aspects of Web 2.0 are crucial in this regard, but epistemological shifts.

Practical implications

Owing to the fact that Web 2.0 and critical information literacy share many similar features, information environments based on participatory technologies and services provide a context ideally suited for the application of the principles of CIL.

Social implications

The paper highlights the correlating dimensions between Web 2.0 and critical information literacy and proposes that Web 2.0 makes necessary a more critical outlook on information literacy.

Originality/value

The paper highlights the correlating dimensions between Web 2.0 and critical information literacy, indicates specific differences between information literacy and critical information literacy and closes with the conclusion that Web 2.0 makes necessary a more critical outlook on information literacy.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 72 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 2006

Jennifer Sharkey

The purpose of this article is to examine information literacy, critical thinking, and computer literacy in higher education and discuss the application of the information

2792

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to examine information literacy, critical thinking, and computer literacy in higher education and discuss the application of the information fluency model, created by the Associated Colleges of the South, to the Purdue University Libraries one‐credit information literacy course, GS 175 Information Strategies.

Design/methodology/approach

The case study has a two‐part focus. The first examines information literacy, critical thinking, and computer literacy in higher education through a review of the literature. The second part discusses the pilot GS 175 Information Strategies course, shows how the information fluency model was applied, and analyzes the overall success of the pilot.

Findings

Today, employers and professors expect graduates and students to exhibit critical thinking, analysis, research, and technology skills at a fairly high level. Universities are responding with a more rapid integration and adoption of technology and creating a higher emphasis on information use and retrieval. Increasingly, student research projects are being displayed, presented, and contained in a variety of formats. Library instruction programs and courses need to evolve and adapt to these changes as shown through the successful modification of the GS 175 Information Strategies course.

Practical implications

The article provides ideas and concepts for enhancing the critical thinking and technology components of an information literacy course or program as well as touches on what to avoid when modifying assignments and projects.

Originality/value

The application of the information fluency model is a fairly new model to the library profession. This case study shows one way information literacy credit courses can be modified to accommodate the changing educational landscape and the expectations of Generation Y. It can be used by instruction librarians and their faculty partners to explore alternatives to their current instructional programs.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 34 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 October 2019

Tessa Withorn, Carolyn Caffrey, Joanna Messer Kimmitt, Jillian Eslami, Anthony Andora, Maggie Clarke, Nicole Patch, Karla Salinas Guajardo and Syann Lunsford

This paper aims to present recently published resources on library instruction and information literacy providing an introductory overview and a selected annotated…

5629

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present recently published resources on library instruction and information literacy providing an introductory overview and a selected annotated bibliography of publications covering all library types.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper introduces and annotates English-language periodical articles, monographs, dissertations, reports and other materials on library instruction and information literacy published in 2018.

Findings

The paper provides a brief description of all 422 sources, and highlights sources that contain unique or significant scholarly contributions.

Originality/value

The information may be used by librarians and anyone interested as a quick reference to literature on library instruction and information literacy.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 47 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 August 2014

Jacalyn E. Bryan

This paper aims to investigate the relationship between information literacy and critical thinking. Specifically, the connection between the elements of critical thinking…

1794

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the relationship between information literacy and critical thinking. Specifically, the connection between the elements of critical thinking as expressed in one university’s Quality Enhancement Plan (QEP) and the advancing learning transforming scholarship (ACRL) Information Literacy Competency Standards (ACRL IL Standards). Concrete examples of how librarians support information literacy and critical thinking were examined.

Design/methodology/approach

Following a literature review, the ACRL IL Standards were mapped to the elements of a university’s QEP (critical thinking + core values = decision-making). A wiki was then created to illicit specific examples from librarians regarding how they incorporate the elements of critical thinking in their reference/instruction work.

Findings

Considerable correspondence was found between the ACRL IL Standards and the elements of critical thinking in the QEP, but this varied with the specific standard and the specific QEP component. Wiki results revealed that librarians used many concrete activities that supported QEP critical-thinking elements.

Research limitations/implications

In this study, mapping the ACRL IL Standards to QEP components was subjective, performed by only one individual. Future research, perhaps involving the forthcoming ACRL IL Standards, might be better carried out by a larger group, thereby enhancing objectivity.

Originality/value

The literature review showed a lack of specificity in how critical thinking is defined and integrated into library reference/instruction work. The present study compared eight specific elements of critical thinking to the ACRL IL Standards and found 108 concrete examples of their application.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 42 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 June 2018

Rebecca Zuege Kuglitsch

This study aims to explore the potential areas of overlap and reinforcement between critical science literacy and information literacy. As an awareness of the limitations…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore the potential areas of overlap and reinforcement between critical science literacy and information literacy. As an awareness of the limitations of traditional definitions of scientific literacy and traditional science instruction has grown, there is an opportunity to apply a critical lens to science and IL.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper examines the literature of critical scientific literacy and connects it to information literacy practices.

Findings

There is considerable room for librarians to foster and support critical scientific literacy in parallel with information literacy. Both literacies align significantly.

Practical implications

IL for students in the sciences can and should take a more critical approach to instruction to support scientific literacy as well as ILI.

Originality/value

Traditional science literacy has had relatively limited impact perhaps, but critical science literacy offers a way to construct science literacy as a meaningful engagement; combining it with critical approaches to information literacy offers the opportunity to reinforce both skills.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 46 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 October 2018

Anna Marie Johnson, Amber Willenborg, Christopher Heckman, Joshua Whitacre, Latisha Reynolds, Elizabeth Alison Sterner, Lindsay Harmon, Syann Lunsford and Sarah Drerup

This paper aims to present recently published resources on information literacy and library instruction through an extensive annotated bibliography of publications…

5521

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present recently published resources on information literacy and library instruction through an extensive annotated bibliography of publications covering all library types.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper annotates English-language periodical articles, monographs, dissertations and other materials on library instruction and information literacy published in 2017 in over 200 journals, magazines, books and other sources.

Findings

The paper provides a brief description for all 590 sources.

Originality/value

The information may be used by librarians and interested parties as a quick reference to literature on library instruction and information literacy.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 46 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 November 2015

Robert Detmering, Anna Marie Johnson, Claudene Sproles, Samantha McClellan and Rosalinda Hernandez Linares

This paper aims to provide an introductory overview and selected annotated bibliography of recent resources on library instruction and information literacy across all…

5022

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide an introductory overview and selected annotated bibliography of recent resources on library instruction and information literacy across all library types.

Design/methodology/approach

It introduces and annotates English-language periodical articles, monographs, dissertations and other materials on library instruction and information literacy published in 2014.

Findings

It provides information about each source, discusses the characteristics of current scholarship and highlights sources that contain unique or significant scholarly contributions.

Originality/value

The information may be used by librarians and interested parties as a quick reference to literature on library instruction and information literacy.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 43 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 August 2019

Nicole A. Beatty and Ernesto Hernandez

The purpose of this paper is to examine the theoretical concept of socially responsible pedagogy because it applies to teaching information literacy.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the theoretical concept of socially responsible pedagogy because it applies to teaching information literacy.

Design/methodology/approach

At Weber State University, two librarians use a socially responsible pedagogical approach, combining critical information literacy and visual literacy to teach an undergraduate information literacy course.

Findings

Initial results suggest that the course design and the authors’ approach to socially responsible pedagogy are largely successful based on students’ application of course material to a signature assignment in the course.

Research limitations/implications

Data are limited because this approach was only used for two semesters. The authors are aware that a socially responsible information literacy classroom needs quality assessment to help make instructional decisions, evaluate teaching strategies and assist with ongoing student learning. Additional semesters of using this instructional approach will allow for reflection and critical inquiry into the theories and teaching strategies that currently inform instruction. Early implications of using this method of instructional design reflect students’ deep understanding of the importance of information literacy because they explore social justice topics.

Practical implications

The practical implications of this research reveal a theoretical framework for teaching critical information literacy, called socially responsible pedagogy. The theory looks at teaching based on the “spirit” of the course, which is the promotion of equality. It also looks at “the art” of designing an information literacy course, incorporating socially responsible pedagogy, culturally responsive teaching and critical information literacy. This study also looks at “the science” of assessment and offers suggestions on how one might go about assessing a socially responsible information literacy class. Moreover, the authors examine how visual literacy helps teach information literacy concepts in the course as students put together a signature assignment that meets both information literacy course objectives and general education outcomes.

Social implications

This general review of the theoretical concept of socially responsible pedagogy is limited to two semesters of information literacy instruction. In researching these topics, students situate themselves within a diverse worldview and work to promote awareness and advocacy through group presentations.

Originality/value

While librarians are exploring critical librarianship and social justice, many are not using socially responsible pedagogy combined with other social theories and images to help students work through the research process and develop information literacy skills.

Article
Publication date: 11 October 2020

Tessa Withorn, Joanna Messer Kimmitt, Carolyn Caffrey, Anthony Andora, Cristina Springfield, Dana Ospina, Maggie Clarke, George Martinez, Amalia Castañeda, Aric Haas and Wendolyn Vermeer

This paper aims to present recently published resources on library instruction and information literacy, providing an introductory overview and a selected annotated…

7510

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present recently published resources on library instruction and information literacy, providing an introductory overview and a selected annotated bibliography of publications covering various library types, study populations and research contexts.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper introduces and annotates English-language periodical articles, monographs, dissertations, reports and other materials on library instruction and information literacy published in 2019.

Findings

The paper provides a brief description of all 370 sources and highlights sources that contain unique or significant scholarly contributions.

Originality/value

The information may be used by librarians, researchers and anyone interested as a quick and comprehensive reference to literature on library instruction and information literacy.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 48 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 15000