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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2002

Lisa Gardner and Con Stough

Investigates whether emotional intelligence measured by the Swinburne University Emotional Intelligence Test predicted transformational, transactional and laissez‐faire leadership…

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Abstract

Investigates whether emotional intelligence measured by the Swinburne University Emotional Intelligence Test predicted transformational, transactional and laissez‐faire leadership styles measured by the multifactor leadership questionnaire in 110 senior level managers. Effective leaders were identified as those who reported transformational rather than transactional behaviours. Emotional intelligence correlated highly with all components of transformational leadership, with the components of understanding of emotions (external) and emotional management the best predictors of this type of leadership style. The utility of emotional intelligence testing in leadership selection and development is discussed.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 23 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 January 2023

Surajit Saha, Roshni Das, Weng Marc Lim, Satish Kumar, Ashish Malik and Bharat Chillakuri

Emotional intelligence (EI) is a critical component of leadership that reflects the ability of leaders to understand how their emotions and actions affect the people around them…

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Abstract

Purpose

Emotional intelligence (EI) is a critical component of leadership that reflects the ability of leaders to understand how their emotions and actions affect the people around them in the organization. This paper aims to deliver state-of-the-art insights on EI and leadership.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper leverages on bibliometric analysis to unpack 25 years of EI and leadership research.

Findings

This paper reveals the bibliometric profile (e.g. trends in publication activity and top articles, authors, countries and journals) and intellectual structure (e.g. themes and topics) of EI and leadership research, shedding light on EI manifestation in leadership, EI and leadership congruence, EI role in leadership and EI and leadership for human resource management.

Research limitations/implications

This paper offers several noteworthy implications. First, EI is a leadership competency that can be cultivated and leveraged to improve leadership effectiveness. Second, the need for EI and leadership congruence indicates that leadership effectiveness is vital to human resource management (HRM). Taken collectively, these theoretical implications, and by extension, practical implications, suggest that increased investment in EI and leadership effectiveness is critical for organizations and their HRM.

Originality/value

This paper sheds light on current trends and ways forward for leading by feeling, showcasing the role and manifestation of EI in leadership, its value for HRM and the importance of its congruence for effective leadership in shaping the future of work.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 44 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2001

Benjamin Palmer, Melissa Walls, Zena Burgess and Con Stough

Emotional intelligence has become increasingly popular as a measure for identifying potentially effective leaders, and as a tool for developing effective leadership skills…

61432

Abstract

Emotional intelligence has become increasingly popular as a measure for identifying potentially effective leaders, and as a tool for developing effective leadership skills. Despite this popularity, however, there is little empirical research that substantiates the efficacy of emotional intelligence in these areas. The aim of the present paper was to explore the relationship between emotional intelligence and effective leadership. Emotional intelligence was assessed by a modified version of the Trait Meta Mood Scale in 43 participants employed in management roles. Effective leaders were identified as those who displayed a transformational rather than transactional leadership style as measured by the multifactor leadership questionnaire. Emotional intelligence correlated with several components of transformational leadership suggesting that it may be an important component of effective leadership. In particular emotional intelligence may account for how effective leaders monitor and respond to subordinates and make them feel at work.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 November 2010

Arnold B. Bakker, Carolyn M. Boyd, Maureen Dollard, Nicole Gillespie, Anthony H. Winefield and Con Stough

The central aim of this study is to incorporate two core personality factors (neuroticism and extroversion) in the job demands‐resources (JD‐R) model.

6443

Abstract

Purpose

The central aim of this study is to incorporate two core personality factors (neuroticism and extroversion) in the job demands‐resources (JD‐R) model.

Design/methodology/approach

It was hypothesized that neuroticism would be most strongly related to the health impairment process, and that extroversion would be most strongly related to the motivational process. The hypotheses were tested in a sample of 3,753 Australian academics, who filled out a questionnaire including job demands and resources, personality, health indicators, and commitment.

Findings

Results were generally in line with predictions. Structural equation modeling analyses showed that job demands predicted health impairment, while job resources predicted organizational commitment. Also, neuroticism predicted health impairment, both directly and indirectly through its effect on job demands, while extroversion predicted organizational commitment, both directly and indirectly through its effect on job resources.

Research limitations/implications

These findings demonstrate the capacity of the JD‐R model to integrate work environment and individual perspectives within a single model of occupational wellbeing.

Practical implications

The study shows that working conditions are related to health and commitment, also after controlling for personality. This suggests that workplace interventions can be used to take care of employee wellbeing.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to the literature by integrating personality in the JD‐R model, and shows how an expanded model explains employee wellbeing.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 15 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 May 2011

Dirk Lindebaum and Susan Cartwright

This paper serves two purposes: first, it is an apology for a failure to produce a planned special issue, along with the rationales as to why the authors decided to withdraw it;…

5609

Abstract

Purpose

This paper serves two purposes: first, it is an apology for a failure to produce a planned special issue, along with the rationales as to why the authors decided to withdraw it; and second, a commentary on the apparent failure of the research community to address a neglected area of inquiry in emotional intelligence (EI) research.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors provide a commentary.

Findings

The authors draw attention to the possiblity that employing highly emotionally intelligent individuals may not always yield desirable outcomes for organisations, thus seeking to ignite a more balanced debate as to the merits of EI in management and leadership studies. The authors also detail briefly several avenues for future research.

Originality/value

The theme of the planned special issue was situated at the forefront EI research, so this commentary succinctly highlights the theorising that informed the background to it.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 32 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 July 2005

Marilyn F. Johnson and Ram Natarajan

We hypothesize that a CEO’s responsiveness to security analysts’ demands for information about the firm is influenced by the structure of the CEO’s compensation package. Our…

1356

Abstract

We hypothesize that a CEO’s responsiveness to security analysts’ demands for information about the firm is influenced by the structure of the CEO’s compensation package. Our analysis is based on a sample of 469 CEO presentations to security analyst societies by 149 firms during the period 1984‐1988. Consistent with the argu ments of Nagar (1999; 1998) that CEO shareholdings and golden parachutes reduce the cost to the CEO of disclosing proprietary information, we find that CEO share holdings and the presence of golden parachutes are positively associated with the total amount of information that a CEO discloses at an analyst society presentation. Consistent with the argument that CEOs whose cash compensation is sensitive to firm performance have incentives to release bad news so as to lower expectations about future performance and, hence, bonus targets, CEO cash compensation performance sensitivities are positively associated with the CEO’s willingness to disclose bad news.

Details

Managerial Finance, vol. 31 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4358

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 26 January 2022

Jacob Fast

Disasters do not discriminate. Socio-political systems create the circumstances by which hazards disproportionately impact some individuals more than others. It is also these…

Abstract

Disasters do not discriminate. Socio-political systems create the circumstances by which hazards disproportionately impact some individuals more than others. It is also these systems that either provide policies, procedures, and processes to help every person recover in an effective and positive manner, or create further inequalities and inequities leading to additional harm and delivering insufficient opportunities for substantial recovery. This chapter seeks to explore the unique disaster response considerations that must be taken into account for individuals with access and functional needs, and the subsequent challenges in recovery that may be experienced by this population. This exploration will be through the lens of justice, including the roles of equality, equity, and human rights. More specifically, this chapter will examine Jerolleman’s principles for Just Recovery and the applicability of this concept to individuals with access and functional needs.

Details

Justice, Equity, and Emergency Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-332-9

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2000

Kiki Deliyanni‐Kouimtzis

Attempts to show the results of an example of an educational policy on gender equality in a very specific aspect of the Greek educational process. Briefly covers the historical…

Abstract

Attempts to show the results of an example of an educational policy on gender equality in a very specific aspect of the Greek educational process. Briefly covers the historical background on equality, the position of women in Greece from 1975 to 1985 and the centralized method of setting primary school books and course content. Shows how gender roles have changed within the prescribed books but questions to what success this has been. Suggests that the changes, whilst an improvement, have actually lessened the volume of women within the material and failed to define a role in which their potential has been fulfilled.

Details

Equal Opportunities International, vol. 19 no. 2/3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0261-0159

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2006

Patricia Friedrich, Luiz Mesquita and Andrés Hatum

Drawing from our current original research on cultural trends in Latin America‐based multinational firms, this paper challenges the stereotypical perception of Latin America as a…

Abstract

Drawing from our current original research on cultural trends in Latin America‐based multinational firms, this paper challenges the stereotypical perception of Latin America as a homogeneous region and explores the cultural distances among groups of multinational employees. After collecting surveys from 733 employees across eight multinationals in Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, and Mexico, we establish that, much like it happens in other lumped‐together regions of the globe, such as “East Asia” and “Africa”, Latin American countries present significant differences in the way firm employees respond to situations where cultural traits are at stake. By researching these countries, we recorded significant variation in aspects such as the treatment and place of women in the workplace, attachment or detachment to formal rules, formal organizational hierarchies, and structured business planning, in addition to varying levels of tolerance to invasion of privacy. Implications of the study include the need to develop methodologies that adequately capture cultural differences within large geographic blocs and business practices that prepare the expatriate, the international manager, and the policy maker for the different realities they are bound to encounter in different countries.

Details

Management Research: Journal of the Iberoamerican Academy of Management, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1536-5433

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Article
Publication date: 19 August 2010

Ziyi Wei

Since China initiated its “go global” policy that promotes its overseas investment, China’s Outward Foreign Direct Investment (OFDI) has increased almost twenty times during the…

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Abstract

Since China initiated its “go global” policy that promotes its overseas investment, China’s Outward Foreign Direct Investment (OFDI) has increased almost twenty times during the last 10 years, reaching $55.9 billion in 2008. The issue of internationalization of Chinese OFDI has attracted increasing attention of researchers from a business perspective. This article systematically reviews the previous studies on overseas investments by Chinese MNEs and discusses the characteristics of Chinese internationalization behavior at both firm level and country level. The internationalization of Chinese companies cannot be understood as a simple game of “catch up” with established MNEs, and more firm‐level empirical studies should be carried out on how these characteristics influence firms’ strategic decisions.

Details

Multinational Business Review, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1525-383X

Keywords

1 – 10 of 57