Search results

1 – 10 of over 4000
Article
Publication date: 21 September 2020

István O. Egresi, Bianca Sorina Răcăşan, Stefan Dezsi, Marin Ilieş and Gabriela Ilieş

Christmas markets have more recently become important tourist attractions in Europe. The purpose of this study is to understand how does this recurring event impact local…

Abstract

Purpose

Christmas markets have more recently become important tourist attractions in Europe. The purpose of this study is to understand how does this recurring event impact local businesses and residents. The research focuses on the city of Cluj-Napoca, Romania.

Design/methodology/approach

This study used both quantitative and qualitative methods. First, a survey was conducted with local residents to evaluate the impact of the Christmas market on the local community. Residents’ perception of social impacts was ascertained by using a five-point Likert scale. The data collected was then processed using the SPSS software. Second, to assess the impact of the Christmas market on the businesses located in the city’s historic central square, semi-structured interviews with managers and front-line employees were conducted. In total, 21 people were interviewed for this study. The interviews were then transcribed, and the content analysis was applied to the textual data.

Findings

The study found that both residents and local businesses have a positive attitude toward the Christmas market. The only negative impact, identified by a segment of the population and some companies, was crowding of public spaces (including parking problems and traffic jams).

Originality/value

This study is novel in that, with one exception, there are no studies on the community impacts of Christmas markets. Moreover, to the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study on Christmas markets in Romania and one of the very few in Eastern Europe.

Details

International Journal of Tourism Cities, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-5607

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 2004

Paola Signori

This case study refers to the details of Bauli, one of the best‐known Italian companies in the confectionery industry's history. In particular, the analysis shows that, in…

1811

Abstract

This case study refers to the details of Bauli, one of the best‐known Italian companies in the confectionery industry's history. In particular, the analysis shows that, in this case, first of all, quality then specialisation and innovation for change have led the organisation to market leadership. The case is structured in three parts. The first sketches out market data about Bauli and direct competitors in different products. The second gives some information about the famous Pandoro cake to underline the typicalness of this traditional recipe. The third introduces Bauli, giving trade information, describing vicissitudes of the firm from its very beginnings, and discussing different key factors of success. Concludes that the tale of this company is similar to many others that have now grown up and out from their local trade areas, and have increased their market share to achieve leadership in their sectors.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 106 no. 10/11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1990

A continuation of the article “YoungEnterprise” in Vol. 32 No. 2. The YoungEnterprise scheme offers young people theopportunity to form and run their owncompanies. At the…

Abstract

A continuation of the article “Young Enterprise” in Vol. 32 No. 2. The Young Enterprise scheme offers young people the opportunity to form and run their own companies. At the end of their business year, the company is formally liquidated and the participants prepare a report and accounts. Extracts from the liquidation report of “Eclipse” a Young Enterprise Company in Weston‐Super‐Mare are presented. The extracts include reports from the Managing Directors, as well as from the major functional directors.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 32 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 17 November 2021

Sophie Yarker

Abstract

Details

Creating Spaces for an Ageing Society
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-739-6

Book part
Publication date: 1 January 2014

Clare Hayden, Mary O’Shaughnessy and Patrick Enright

This chapter aims to explore the means by which rural food business networks can contribute to sustainable rural development.

Abstract

Purpose

This chapter aims to explore the means by which rural food business networks can contribute to sustainable rural development.

Methodology/approach

This chapter explores the role of rural food business networks in sustainable rural development. This is conducted initially through a literature review. This is followed by presentation of case studies of two Irish rural food business networks; a discussion of the evident rural development brought about by the actions and activities of these networks; and an exploration of some of the factors that influence the capacity of the networks to bring about rural development.

Findings

This chapter presents evidence that demonstrates the important contribution rural business networks can make to rural development. It also finds that factors such as autonomy, embeddedness and place can influence the effectiveness of a network in bringing about and sustaining rural development.

Research limitations/implications

Despite several interesting findings emerging from this research, the level to which these findings can be generalised is limited. Future research of aspects of network operation such as access to infrastructure and services would assist in ascertaining the importance of place for rural business networks and their ability to bring about rural development.

Practical implications

Given the significant role that networks now play in the rural development strategies of place-based organisations, this chapter has important implications for how those organisations initiate and structure those networks.

Social implications

This chapter can serve as an encouragement to rural entrepreneurs to engage in networking activities to reduce rural isolation, create stronger links with their consumers and to sustain their businesses.

Originality/value of chapter

The focus of this chapter on factors such as embeddedness, autonomy and place and their impact on rural business networks, provides a rare opportunity to the reader to appreciate the influence of these factors on networks and their capacity to bring about and sustain rural development.

Details

Enterprising Places: Leadership and Governance Networks
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-641-5

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1968

GORDON E. WHEELER

So far as the writer knows the product described in this case has yet to reach the national market—if it has done so, it certainly has not captured the imagination of the…

1109

Abstract

So far as the writer knows the product described in this case has yet to reach the national market—if it has done so, it certainly has not captured the imagination of the masses necessary for its success. Readers might like—perhaps profitably—to consider the merits and demerits of the product described and its marketing. Perhaps the most venturesome may be able to contribute a story of success (we hope!), or failure to these columns. As every reader knows, practically anything can be a Christmas “sell”. One can dress the most ordinary product in the gaudy tinsel or special Christmas pack, and even the prosaic filing cabinet is “the perfect Christmas gift” if your husband or wife happens to be secretary to the local village or town group. However, the case discussed here is about a product which could be the centrepiece of Christmas evenings—the Christmas cake; and yet this much admired and marketed product has not, as yet, received as much attention as might have been thought likely. After all, perhaps 10 m. or more cakes are made and sold each Christmas in the UK alone, and then there are export possibilities! But on with the case …

Details

Management Decision, vol. 2 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 9 December 2021

Ann-Marie Kennedy, Martin K.J. Waiguny and Maree Alice Lockie

This paper seeks to explore the functions of Christmas mythemes for children’s consumption culture development. In addition, the purpose of this study is to provide an…

670

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to explore the functions of Christmas mythemes for children’s consumption culture development. In addition, the purpose of this study is to provide an insight on the development of Central European Children into customers and how mythemes are associated with the wishing behaviour.

Design/methodology/approach

Levi-Strauss’ (1955) structural analysis was used to uncover the mythemes of the Christmas story for Austrian children. These mythemes then informed a thematic analysis of 283 Austrian children’s Christmas letters. Campbell’s (1970) functions of myths were used to reflect on the findings.

Findings

The Christmas mythemes uncovered were found to encourage materialism by linking self-enhancement (good acquirement) with self-transcendent (good behaviour) values. The role of myths to relieve the tension between the incongruent values of collective/other-oriented and materialistic values is expanded upon. Such sanctification of selfish good acquisition is aided by the mythemes related especially to the Christkind and baby Jesus. Instead, marketers should use Christmas mythemes which emphasise family and collective/other-centred values.

Originality/value

By first uncovering the “mythemes” related to Christmas, the authors contribute to the academic understanding of Christmas, going beyond origin or single myth understandings and acknowledging the multifaceted components of Christmas. The second contribution is in exploring mytheme’s representation in children’s Christmas letters and reflecting on their functions. This differs from previous literature because it looks at one of the main cultural vehicles for Christmas socialisation and its intersection with the mythemes that feed children’s consumption culture formation. Through the authors’ presentation of a conceptual framework that links mytheme functions with proximal processes using a socioecological viewpoint, the authors demonstrate the guidance of mythemes in children’s development. The third contribution is a reflection on the potential ethical implications for children’s formation of their consumer culture based on the functions of the mythemes. Furthermore, the authors add to the existing body of research by investigating a Central European context.

Book part
Publication date: 11 October 2018

Leanne McRae

Abstract

Details

Terror, Leisure and Consumption: Spaces for Harm in a Post-Crash Era
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-526-5

Article
Publication date: 1 July 2006

Thomas K. Tiemann and James L. Barbour

This paper aims to provide a classification for the process by which crafters find appropriate consumers in the post‐modern market structure that exists between black or…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide a classification for the process by which crafters find appropriate consumers in the post‐modern market structure that exists between black or gray markets where illegal or illegally obtained goods are sold, and the markets that serve the Fordist, mass‐production, mass‐distribution portion of an economy.

Design/methodology/approach

Principally the research was done via personal interviews and visits to craft show sites and comparing the findings to the existing street‐market structures of Europe.

Findings

The institutions that have evolved to support market segregation/segmentation in crafts markets are interesting and are better understood within a classification system like the one developed here. How these institutions differ from the street‐market culture of Europe lends an insight into this uniquely American post‐modern market system.

Research limitations/implications

This study is the beginning of a larger body of work that should be undertaken to better comprehend how the increasing post‐modern market structure is interacting with and occasionally replacing, the traditional market structures in the USA.

Practical implications

As the post‐modern market structure becomes more prevalent in the USA understanding how it is similar to and differs from, the comparable market structures in Europe is important to policy decisions on the local level, particularly with respect to local support of this type of market.

Originality/value

This work extends earlier work looking at farmers’ markets into the crafts market environment. As such it brings the overall understanding of the post‐modern market structure in to more clear focus.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 26 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 2001

TV advertising is not what it used to be for Kids and Young Adults. There's a proliferation of programming and channel choice; more communication clutter and poorly…

Abstract

TV advertising is not what it used to be for Kids and Young Adults. There's a proliferation of programming and channel choice; more communication clutter and poorly targeted, lower quality TV commercials. Moreover the New Media is biting into the time that young people watch TV at home which of course includes the Ads. The Internet will become more important to this target market as penetration increases and broadband delivery becomes the affordable norm. But using Ad Banners to do the job alone will not suffice in today's Net Generation Culture. This article discusses the key issues confronting marketers who want to get mote ‘click’ from their ‘digital spends’.

Details

International Journal of Advertising and Marketing to Children, vol. 2 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1464-6676

Keywords

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