Search results

1 – 10 of over 7000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 22 October 2010

Wayne W. Smith, Stephen W. Litvin, Andrea Canberg and Stacy R. Tomas

The purpose of this paper is to determine how festivals allocated their funds among various expense categories.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to determine how festivals allocated their funds among various expense categories.

Design/methodology/approach

Festival managers from across North and South Carolina were asked to specify the percentages of their expense budgets allocated to each of the following categories: marketing, administrative, entertainment and operations.

Findings

It was found that “smaller” festivals spend a significantly greater proportion of their budgets on marketing (23 percent) and a far smaller share on administrative expenditures (5 percent) than do their “larger” counterparts that spend only 15 percent on marketing and triple the “smaller” festival's administrative costs (15 percent). The differences related to their spending for entertainment (35 versus 28 percent) and operations (36 versus 41 percent) are not as dramatic in relation to their proportion of total spending. The data herein suggest that festival size plays an important role when it comes to such allocations.

Originality/value

The paper has provided benchmarks that hopefully will assist festival directors' budget‐decision‐making strategies as they allow a measure with which to evaluate those decisions. While the research needs to be interpreted with great care due to its relatively small sample size and broad budgetary categorizations, the findings provide a guide to assist festival organizers as they manage their events for the benefit of their stakeholders and the communities that support them. The paper also provides a starting point for future research in this area, much of which is needed.

Details

International Journal of Event and Festival Management, vol. 1 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1758-2954

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 2001

Meg Houghton

For many wineries and wine regions the annual wine festival is a strategic tool for encouraging cellar door visitation. Wine festivals offer the opportunity to socialise…

Abstract

For many wineries and wine regions the annual wine festival is a strategic tool for encouraging cellar door visitation. Wine festivals offer the opportunity to socialise, possibly with friends and family, whilst learning about and enjoying a natural, agricultural setting and product. Revenue and recognition is generated for the participating wineries, awareness of the area and its resources is enhanced, and the community at large and outside providers find a new source of customers. Whilst this is a worthy list of benefits for all stakeholders, is there a longer‐term direct benefit to wineries? This study of wine festival participants looks at the propensity of wine festival attendees to be persuaded to revisit the participating wineries as a consequence of their attendance at a wine festival. The paper concludes that there are positive future visitation benefits not just for the wineries staging the festival but also the influence extends and benefits the wider industry.

Details

International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 6 April 2012

Insun Sunny Lee, Charles Arcodia and Timothy Jeonglyeol Lee

The purpose of this paper is to examine why people visit multicultural festivals, with the overall aim being to better understand the apparent popularity of multicultural…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine why people visit multicultural festivals, with the overall aim being to better understand the apparent popularity of multicultural festivals. The paper aims to provide key stakeholders with a platform upon which to better manage and improve multicultural festivals as tourism attractions.

Design/methodology/approach

An on‐site questionnaire survey was administered at one of the multicultural festivals in South Korea in 2010. The reasons for visit were measured using a scale based on existing benefit scales, and literature related to multiculturalism. In total, 17 items were analyzed as visitor reasons for their visit. Demographic questions included age, nationality, the reason for living in South Korea if not a Korean, and gender. Out of 203 collected questionnaires, 183 were considered usable.

Findings

In total, five factors were identified as the reasons for attending a multicultural festival – family togetherness, escape, cultural exploration, socialization, and curiosity. The cultural exploration proved to be the most common reason for attending a multicultural festival for visitors.

Practical implications

The findings of this study will help all key stakeholders to more fully understand what visitors want, and guide festival management to organize sustainable festivals as a niche tourism attraction. Due to the desire for cultural exploration, festivals should offer multicultural themed activities. Sport competitions can be good for socialization between migrants and South Koreans, or migrants themselves.

Originality/value

Although multicultural festivals are held in many countries, there appears to be little research into the multicultural festivals in a country like South Korea, in transit from being ethnically homogeneous to becoming a multicultural society. This paper is a pioneer study in that particular discipline.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 31 May 2013

Stephen Litvin, Bing Pan and Wayne Smith

The accurate measure of the economic contribution of festivals and special events is a challenge. Using a case study, the purpose of this paper is to demonstrate a…

Abstract

Purpose

The accurate measure of the economic contribution of festivals and special events is a challenge. Using a case study, the purpose of this paper is to demonstrate a previously un‐captured economic contribution from increased hotel rates during the period of festival or event; the “rising tide” effect.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper uses a case study on Charleston's hotel occupancy changes, and how the changes coincide with the occurrence of festivals and events in the community, to demonstrate the increased tourism income due to rising accommodation prices during festivals and events.

Findings

The study validates the increased tourism income due to rising accommodation prices during festivals and events, which can provide a significant boost to the economy of a local community.

Practical implications

Festival organizations, as well as hoteliers and other beneficiaries of tourist spending during festivals and events, should note how this additional contribution benefits them and their communities.

Originality/value

Many economic contributions of festivals/events overstate their values. The current study first demonstrates a previously un‐captured economic contribution using a case study approach.

Details

International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6182

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 27 July 2021

Dev Jani and John R. Philemon Mwakyusa

The purpose of the paper is to test the perceived economic, socio-cultural and environmental impacts on the satisfaction of local residents with the Zanzibar International…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the paper is to test the perceived economic, socio-cultural and environmental impacts on the satisfaction of local residents with the Zanzibar International Film Festival.

Design/methodology/approach

Structured questionnaires were administered to 299 local Zanzibaris, to obtain the data necessary for hypotheses testing using Structural Equation Modelling through Smart PLS 3.0.

Findings

The findings reveal that locals' perceptions related to economic, cultural, environmental and pride impacts of the festival had greater positive significant effects on the level of satisfaction of local residents compared to image, entertainment and social impacts.

Research limitations/implications

The findings uphold the utility of Social Exchange Theory in explaining local residents' perceptions of the festival. The results contribute to the existing literature on festivals by affirming the multidimensional nature of their social consequences.

Practical implications

Managerially, the results shed light on possible areas to be improved by festival promoters from both the public and private sectors in enhancing the positive perceptions held by local residents as well as improving festivals in the area or similar context.

Originality/value

The study expands the Triple Bottom Line dimensions of sustainability in the festival context by adding pride, entertainment and image perceived value.

Details

International Journal of Event and Festival Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1758-2954

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 9 July 2021

Valsaraj Payini, Kartikeya Bolar, Jyothi Mallya and Vasanth Kamath

This study aims to identify and validate the different clusters of wine festival visitors based on their hedonic motivation. Further, this study also sought how identified…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to identify and validate the different clusters of wine festival visitors based on their hedonic motivation. Further, this study also sought how identified clusters were different in terms of perceived value, satisfaction and loyalty to the wine festival.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was conducted during the International Beach Wine Festival held in Karnataka, India, to collect primary data from 400 visitors. Data were subjected to a two-step cluster analysis. Further, cluster segmentation based on visitors’ demographics, perceived value, satisfaction and loyalty was conducted. Decision tree analysis based on recursive partitioning algorithm was used to validate the clusters.

Findings

A two-step cluster analysis identified two distinct segments and named those as elite and informal visitors based on hedonic motivation. The cluster scores show that the elite group had the best ratings on social status, socialization and family harmony. On the other hand, the informal group had top scores for wine tasting, enjoyment, change from routine and the festival atmosphere. Decision tree analysis results indicate that social status enjoyment and taste motives differentiate an informal group from the elite group.

Research limitations/implications

This study was conducted in a wine festival held in a single location. To assess the strength of the results, case studies in other regions will be of importance.

Originality/value

This study extended the knowledge of the wine festival by adapting hedonic motivation as a basis for wine festival segmentation. Besides, this study’s empirical findings would greatly benefit wine festival organizers to formulate an appropriate marketing strategy to target each wine festival visitors’ cluster based on the differentiating factors obtained from the decision tree modelling.

Details

International Journal of Wine Business Research, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1062

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 28 June 2021

Montira Intason, Willem Coetzee and Craig Lee

The contradiction between the purpose of the water-splashing tradition, the use of water in a water-stressed destination and overconsumption during a time of water…

Abstract

Purpose

The contradiction between the purpose of the water-splashing tradition, the use of water in a water-stressed destination and overconsumption during a time of water shortage led the researchers to question the spirit of the Songkran Festival. It is important to keep the spirit of the festival alive without interrupting the livelihoods of the community and to critically engage with opportunities and challenges related to water-saving practices during the festival. Thus, this study aims to investigate the opportunities and challenges to responsible practices of water-saving at a cultural festival, using a case study of the water-splashing practice at the Songkran Festival in Thailand.

Design/methodology/approach

This study used the cultural practice, namely, the water-splashing tradition at the Songkran Festival in Thailand, as a case study. The researchers conducted document analysis on local newspapers, the Bangkok Post specifically and participant observation at the Songkran Festival in the Khao San Road area in Bangkok, to gain first-hand insights to develop comprehensive results which answers the study’s objectives.

Findings

The key findings show three significant themes representing the opportunities for implementing sustainable water-saving practices; a call for a water-saving campaign, education on water saving and water-splashing restrictions. In terms of challenges to implementing water-saving practices, two key themes emerged; a lack of water stress and drought awareness and the hedonistic characteristic of water splashing. The study findings provide important implications to theory and practice for sustainable event management and provide considerations for event stakeholders to minimise water overuse in festivals.

Originality/value

Environmental degradation is a key global issue that the United Nations addresses in the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) scheme (United Nations Development Program, 2016). According to Pereira et al. (2009), water scarcity can be caused by both human activities and natural causes. Factors such as unlimited water consumption, population growth and climate change are some of the contributing factors that not only affects resident's access to water but also on events hosted within communities. It is crucial that event managers critically re-think the way festivals are designed in water-stressed destinations.

Details

International Journal of Event and Festival Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1758-2954

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 2 July 2021

Marisol Alonso-Vazquez and Christina Ballico

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has once again brought to our attention one of the three main pillars of sustainability–the environment. It has also…

Abstract

Purpose

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has once again brought to our attention one of the three main pillars of sustainability–the environment. It has also brought into sharp relief the fragility of the live music festival sector, whose success hinges fundamentally on the capacity for both travel and mass gatherings to occur. Considering this intersection of environmental sustainability and the live music festival sector, this paper–which reports on events occurring long before the global pandemic took hold–examines the ways in which eight Australian folk and world music festivals successfully engage in eco-friendly and pro-environmental practices and educational activities at their events. Findings from this research will assist industry practitioners in being able to engage in similar practices at their events, as well as further academic understandings of the relationship between the environment and the live music sector, and the role of environmental communication practices within this.

Design/methodology/approach

This study engaged an exploratory research design using interviews to gain an insight into the perceptions of eight live music festival promoters regarding their patrons' on-site eco-friendly behaviours and engagement with the eco-friendly initiatives at their events.

Findings

Social support within the on-site festival community (applied here through the notion of a sense of communitas), coupled with the provision of eco-friendly initiatives and effective environmental communication approaches, were key pivot drivers to support patrons' pro-environmental behaviours. Engagement with environmental authorities and experts during the festivals was found to validate their eco-friendly approaches.

Originality/value

This paper provides details of, as well as insights into, the success of the eco-friendly and pro-environmental education practices engaged at select world and folk music festivals in Australia. It broadens and builds upon existing understandings of environmental communication practices.

Details

Arts and the Market, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4945

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 28 June 2021

Martinette Kruger and Adam Viljoen

This exploratory study aims to show that events can create awareness and facilitate behavioural change among attendees. Festivals and events can use the United Nations…

Abstract

Purpose

This exploratory study aims to show that events can create awareness and facilitate behavioural change among attendees. Festivals and events can use the United Nations sustainable development goals as drivers of societal change and business growth. Unfortunately, the attendees to a benefit concert have not been investigated to date. This study fills this gap by segmenting attendees to a benefit concert aimed at eradicating poverty.

Design/methodology/approach

A quantitative destination-based survey was undertaken at the Mandela 100: Global Citizen Festival in Johannesburg, South Africa, in 2018. A simple random sampling method was used within a stratified sampling method, and 408 questionnaires were obtained.

Findings

Three psychographic segmentation variables were used: motives for attending the event (novelty, escape and socialization and cause advocating); behavioural intentions and change as a result of attending the event (cognition and awareness, loyalty-related behaviour, active engagement and travel-related behaviour); and global causes aimed at eradicating poverty that attendees regard as important to support (social, sustainability, fiscal, fundamental and elevated prosperity). The results revealed three distinct segments, proposing that an AID-typology applies to benefit concert attendees: advocates, inspirers and discoverers. Each group has either a high, moderate or low level of commitment towards the festival’s and other global causes.

Practical implications

Practical implications are suggested as guidelines to encourage advocacy and active involvement for global causes.

Originality/value

This study was conducted from a developing country’s perspective and contextualizes the role that events can play in advocating for specific causes and encouraging citizens to get involved.

Details

International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6182

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 6 May 2021

Li-Chun Hsu

This study aims to investigate the effects of visitors’ dietary habits on their acceptance of local food from the perspective of positive (e.g. local food involvement) and…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the effects of visitors’ dietary habits on their acceptance of local food from the perspective of positive (e.g. local food involvement) and negative (e.g. food neophobia) food-related personality traits.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was conducted on visitors to the Slow Food Festival in Taitung, Taiwan. A total of 327 valid questionnaire responses were collected and structural equation modeling was used to conduct path analyzes.

Findings

The analysis results supported all hypotheses. Food neophobia plays a key factor in moderating roles.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the literature by integrating positive and negative perspectives of food-related personality traits. In addition, this study proposes that food neophobia plays a moderating role in food choice and behavioral decisions.

Details

International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6182

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 7000