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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1993

Janelle M. Zauha

Browsing rooms are those alluring spaces in the college or university library where the reader may shut out the flood and clamor of information. Here the imagination and…

Abstract

Browsing rooms are those alluring spaces in the college or university library where the reader may shut out the flood and clamor of information. Here the imagination and personal interests of the reader are nurtured. Today's browsing rooms are vestiges of the 1920s and 1930s, developed in an era when academic libraries vigorously promoted recreational reading interests of students. As repositories of works chosen from the main collection for their ability to uplift, relax, and stimulate the student reader, the browsing collection in the college library of the 1930s was itself the embodiment of readers' advisory, that Cadillac of public library services.

Details

Collection Building, vol. 12 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

Book part
Publication date: 1 January 2005

Lan Xia and Kent B. Monroe

Abstract

Details

Review of Marketing Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-723-0

Article
Publication date: 15 June 2021

Soyeon Park and Kihun Cho

This study aims to investigate and compare mobile and desktop user search behaviours of the 1300K site, a Korean shopping search engine, by using transaction log analysis.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate and compare mobile and desktop user search behaviours of the 1300K site, a Korean shopping search engine, by using transaction log analysis.

Design/methodology/approach

Transaction logs of 1300K site were collected over a three months’ period, from 1 January to 31 March 2018. The data set of this study consists of 1,149,690 desktop queries, 2,346,938 mobile queries, 2,481,747 desktop browsing activities and 2,550,309 mobile browsing activities. This study quantitatively analyses transaction log of 1300K site.

Findings

The results of this study show that mobile usage is higher than desktop usage: there are more mobile sessions than desktop sessions and the number of mobile queries is more than double of desktop queries. Overall, mobile query search behaviours are more simple, targeted and focused than desktop query search behaviours. Also, mobile browsing behaviours are more simple and passive than desktop browsing behaviours. However, mobile click behaviours are more active than desktop click behaviours.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this study appears to be the first of its type in Korea that compared search behaviours of a large number of users on desktop computers and mobile phones. To identify various characteristics of user search behaviours, this study analyses users’ directory browsing behaviour and click behaviour as well as query search behaviour. The results of this study can be implemented to address the effective improvement and development of search services and interfaces for different devices.

Details

The Electronic Library , vol. 39 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 29 April 2021

Hei-Fong Ho

This study is to propose a more effective and efficient analytic methodology based on within-site clickstream associated with path visualization to explore the channel…

Abstract

Purpose

This study is to propose a more effective and efficient analytic methodology based on within-site clickstream associated with path visualization to explore the channel dependence of consumers' latent shopping intent and the related behaviors, with which in turn to gain insight concerning the interactivity between webpages.

Design/methodology/approach

The primary intention of the research is to design and develop a more effective and efficient approach for exploring the consumers' latent shopping intent and the related behaviors from the clickstream data. The proposed methodology is to use text-mining package, consisting of the combination of hierarchical recurrent neural networks and Hopfield-like neural network equipped with Laplacian-based graph visualization to visualize the consumers' browsing patterns. Based on the observed interactivity between webpages, consumers' latent shopping intent and the related behaviors can be understood.

Findings

The key finding is to evidence that consumers' latent shopping intent and related behaviors within website depend on channels the consumers click through. The accessing consumers through channels of paid search and display advertising are identified and categorized as goal-directed and exploratory modes, respectively. The results also indicate that the effect of the content of webpage on the consumer's purchase intent varies with channels. This implies that website optimization and attribution of online advertising should also be channel-dependent.

Practical implications

This is important for the managerial and theoretical implications: First, to uncover the channel dependence of consumer's latent shopping intent and browsing behaviors would be helpful to the attribution of the online advertising for the sales promotion. Second, in the past, webmasters did not understand users' preferences and make decisions of reorganization purely on the user's browsing path (sequential page view) without appraising psychological perspective, that is, user's latent shopping intent.

Originality/value

This study is the first to explore the channel dependences of consumer's latent shopping intent and the related browsing behaviors through within-site clickstream associated with path visualization. The findings are helpful to the attribution of the online advertising for the sales promotion and useful for webmasters to optimize the effectiveness and usability of their websites and in turn promote the purchase decision.

Details

Data Technologies and Applications, vol. 55 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9288

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 16 October 2009

Koraljka Golub and Marianne Lykke

The purpose of this study is twofold: to investigate whether it is meaningful to use the Engineering Index (Ei) classification scheme for browsing, and then, if proven…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is twofold: to investigate whether it is meaningful to use the Engineering Index (Ei) classification scheme for browsing, and then, if proven useful, to investigate the performance of an automated classification algorithm based on the Ei classification scheme.

Design/methodology/approach

A user study was conducted in which users solved four controlled searching tasks. The users browsed the Ei classification scheme in order to examine the suitability of the classification systems for browsing. The classification algorithm was evaluated by the users who judged the correctness of the automatically assigned classes.

Findings

The study showed that the Ei classification scheme is suited for browsing. Automatically assigned classes were on average partly correct, with some classes working better than others. Success of browsing showed to be correlated and dependent on classification correctness.

Research limitations/implications

Further research should address problems of disparate evaluations of one and the same web page. Additional reasons behind browsing failures in the Ei classification scheme also need further investigation.

Practical implications

Improvements for browsing were identified: describing class captions and/or listing their subclasses from start; allowing for searching for words from class captions with synonym search (easily provided for Ei since the classes are mapped to thesauri terms); when searching for class captions, returning the hierarchical tree expanded around the class in which caption the search term is found. The need for improvements of classification schemes was also indicated.

Originality/value

A user‐based evaluation of automated subject classification in the context of browsing has not been conducted before; hence the study also presents new findings concerning methodology.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 65 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 April 2010

Lan Xia

Browsing is a common consumer behavior, but it has not been researched extensively. The aim of this paper is to fill some of the gaps in the research.

4351

Abstract

Purpose

Browsing is a common consumer behavior, but it has not been researched extensively. The aim of this paper is to fill some of the gaps in the research.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing on literature from different areas, consumers' browsing experiences, browsing patterns, and factors influencing browsing activities are empirically examined. A combination of interviews and shopping trips with informants to examine the issues are used.

Findings

The results show that browsing serves both functional and recreational purposes. Consumers vary by the degree to which they browse functionally or recreationally. Browsing behaviors are influenced by both consumer characteristics and the retail environment. Browsing is a powerful consumer information acquisition activity and has both desired and undesired consequences for consumer purchases. Consumers use various strategies to cope with the undesired consequences.

Practical implications

Exploration of browsing patterns and factors influencing these patterns suggests important managerial implications for enhancing desirable browsing and reducing unnecessary browsing.

Originality/value

The conceptualization and findings of this research contribute to two areas of research: consumer information search and consumer shopping behaviors in retail environments. An examination of the role of browsing offers an empirical extension to the information acquisition framework.

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 July 2002

Carol Kaufman‐Scarborough and Jay D. Lindquist

In the present study, the authors propose a segmentation schema based on patterns of e‐browsing and e‐purchasing. We examine self‐reports of browsing and purchasing using…

7203

Abstract

In the present study, the authors propose a segmentation schema based on patterns of e‐browsing and e‐purchasing. We examine self‐reports of browsing and purchasing using five specific non‐store channels: the Internet, television infomercials, advertising that accompanies regular television programming, television shopping channels, and print catalogs. Our findings indicate that shoppers who browse and/or purchase on the Internet differ in their use of multi‐channel options related to their perceptions of convenience. Some shoppers clearly want to purchase in the store setting and reject multiple forms of non‐store shopping. Others like to browse various non‐store media and have extended their browsing to the Internet, yet maintain their loyalty to in‐store purchases. Retailers who attempt to “convert” such shoppers to Internet‐only purchasing may alienate the shoppers who rely on the Internet solely for information.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 19 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 February 2019

Miralem Helmefalk

This paper aims to examine how multi-sensory cues, when store-congruent, influence consumer browsing behaviour and its subsequent effect on purchasing.

2106

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine how multi-sensory cues, when store-congruent, influence consumer browsing behaviour and its subsequent effect on purchasing.

Design/methodology/approach

Two studies were used with a field experimental design in a furnishing retail store to examine browsing behaviour and purchasing in a visual, auditory, olfactory and a multi-sensory treatment group. Data were gathered over 12 weeks. This study was a set of studies comprising my dissertation thesis (Helmefalk, 2017).

Findings

Findings show that multi-sensory cues in a retail atmosphere are evidently influencing purchasing via browsing behaviour as a mediator.

Originality/value

The findings evidence browsing behaviour as a mediator and predictor for purchasing, which emphasizes its conceptual and empirical contribution in terms of modifying retail atmospheres. The work contributes to the field of retailing, sensory marketing and consumer behaviour, a novel view on the linkages between multi-sensory cues, browsing behaviour and purchasing.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 36 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 August 2002

François Bry and Michael Kraus

While the World Wide Web (WWW or Web) is steadily expanding, electronic books (e‐books) remain a niche market. In this article, it is first postulated that specialized…

1135

Abstract

While the World Wide Web (WWW or Web) is steadily expanding, electronic books (e‐books) remain a niche market. In this article, it is first postulated that specialized contents and device independence can make Web‐based e‐books compete with paper prints; and that adaptive features that can be implemented by client‐side computing are relevant for e‐books, while more complex forms of adaptation requiring server‐side computations are not. Then, enhancements of the WWW standards (specifically of XML, XHTML, of the style‐sheet languages CSS and XSL, and of the linking language XLink) are proposed for a better support of client‐side adaptation and device independent content modeling. Finally, advanced browsing functionalities desirable for e‐books as well as their implementation in the WWW context are described.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 29 October 2019

Yanhong Chen, Yaobin Lu, Sumeet Gupta and Zhao Pan

Social shopping website (SSW) introduce the social side into the shopping process, thus making “window” shopping or browsing more interesting for customers. The purpose of…

1596

Abstract

Purpose

Social shopping website (SSW) introduce the social side into the shopping process, thus making “window” shopping or browsing more interesting for customers. The purpose of this paper is to investigate customer online browsing experience and its antecedents (i.e. information quality and social interaction) and consequences (i.e. urge to buy impulsively and continuous browsing intention) in the context of SSW.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey questionnaire was distributed to visitors of online SSW to collect data, and partial least squares technology was used to test the research model.

Findings

The results of this study reveal that three types of web browsing, namely, utilitarian browsing, hedonic browsing and social browsing, take place in a SSW. The unique factors of SSW, namely, the quality of user generated contents and social interaction are critical for facilitating customers’ browsing experiences. Furthermore, the findings reveal that hedonic browsing experience is found to be the most salient factor influencing customers’ urge to buy impulsively and continuance intention.

Practical implications

The findings suggest that practitioners, such as designers and managers of SSW should give special attention to the benefits of browsing activity to convert web browsers into impulse purchasers and increase customers’ loyalty. Moreover, they should focus on improving the quality of user generated content and pay more attention to support and encourage social interaction to enhance browsing experiences on a SSW.

Originality/value

Existing studies about browsing behavior mostly focus on traditional online e-commerce website. This study represents the first step toward understanding browsing activity on SSW. Moreover, prior studies mainly focused on utilitarian and hedonic browsing experience; however, there is a lack of research on social browsing experience. The current study attempts to fill this research gap.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 33 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

Keywords

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