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Publication date: 10 August 2018

Ramkrishnan (Ram) V. Tenkasi and Lu Zhang

Organizational Development and Change (ODC) has been called to aid organizational greening goals. Carbon labeling of products by organizations is a common greening…

Abstract

Organizational Development and Change (ODC) has been called to aid organizational greening goals. Carbon labeling of products by organizations is a common greening strategy. However, its effectiveness is dependent on supportive consumer behavior. The Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) is used to explain actor choice in buying low carbon products (LCPs). Actual buying behavior of 873 subjects in China, a country new to carbon labeling, demonstrated that Declarative norms, Attitude, and Perceived behavioral control explained significant variance in actual buying behavior of LCPs. The TPB model may be better served by observing actual behavior versus behavioral intention. Revisions to the TPB model for diagnosis and interventions in behavioral change are indicated. ODC should revert to theoretically informed practice versus the increasing reliance on A-theoretical tools and techniques.

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Article
Publication date: 8 May 2017

Samuel Mafabi, Sentrine Nasiima, Edgar Mutakirwa Muhimbise, Francis Kasekende and Caroline Nakiyonga

This paper aims to examine the mediation role of behavioral intention in the relationship between attitude, subjective norm, perceived behavioral control and knowledge…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the mediation role of behavioral intention in the relationship between attitude, subjective norm, perceived behavioral control and knowledge sharing behavior.

Design/methodology/approach

The study adopted a cross-sectional design to collect data used to carry out mediation analysis. Structural equation modeling was used to test for the mediation effect based on the theory of planned behavior.

Findings

The results reveal positive and significant relationships between attitude, subjective norm, perceived behavioral control and behavioral intention. There is a full mediation effect of behavioral intention between attitude, subjective norm, perceived behavioral control and knowledge sharing behavior. This implies that behavioral intention wholly processes planned behavior prediction.

Research limitations/implications

The sample size was small, covering only two referral hospitals which affects the generalization of findings across all the hospitals in Uganda. The study was cross-sectional focusing on a one-off perception, which does not examine knowledge sharing behavior over time. This may necessitate follow-up studies in a longitudinal design to capture the trend of results.

Practical implications

Managers in referral hospitals should create opportunities for health professionals to enhance knowledge sharing behavior. Knowledge sharing practices should be embedded in the performance appraisal and reward systems which should promote positive knowledge sharing attitudes and norms and develop self-efficacy.

Originality/value

The study generates empirical evidence on less studied phenomena in the health sector focusing on behavioral intention mediation in predicting knowledge sharing behavior.

Details

VINE Journal of Information and Knowledge Management Systems, vol. 47 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-5891

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2015

Jody L. Crosno, Robert Dahlstrom and Chris Manolis

The purpose of this study is to examine change requests in buyer-supplier relationships. Change requests arise when a channel partner wants an addition or alteration to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine change requests in buyer-supplier relationships. Change requests arise when a channel partner wants an addition or alteration to the agreed-upon deliverable. Although these requests are intended to enhance consumer satisfaction and supply chain performance, they complicate development and production processes and may delay time to market. Responses to change requests may embody compliance or malice, yet research to date has not examined these requests in interfirm relationships. To this end, the authors examine supplier reactions (compliance and opportunism) to change requests made by the buying firm.

Design/methodology/approach

Survey data gathered from 118 third-party developers (i.e. suppliers) reporting on their relationship with the software buyer provide an initial test for the authors’ proposed model.

Findings

The results of a path analysis indicate that change requests are related positively to supplier compliance with those requests and supplier opportunism. Outcome-based control decreases supplier compliance when there are extensive change requests. Behavioral control, in contrast, increases supplier compliance particularly when the buyer provides support for the requested changes.

Research limitations/implications

Future research should examine relational governance and ex ante control mechanisms as alternatives to outcome-based and behavioral control.

Practical implications

The authors’ results suggest that buyers requesting extensive changes should use behavioral control mechanisms and provide support to the supplier implementing the changes.

Originality/value

The authors provide a preliminary examination of suppliers’ reactions to change requests made by buying firms. The authors argue that these requests may limit the autonomy of the supplying firms, creating reactance effects. The authors investigate outcome-based control, behavioral control and buyer support as factors that influence supplier reactions to change requests.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 30 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 10 May 2021

Guan-Yu Lin, Yi-Shun Wang, Yu-Min Wang and Meng-Hsuan Lee

The study aims to examine the relationships among personality traits (i.e. the Big Five personality traits and locus of control), self-perceived facial attractiveness…

Abstract

Purpose

The study aims to examine the relationships among personality traits (i.e. the Big Five personality traits and locus of control), self-perceived facial attractiveness, motivations (i.e. intrinsic and extrinsic motivation) and intention toward live stream broadcasting. It also investigates the moderating role of perceived behavioral control in the relationship between motivations and intention.

Design/methodology/approach

Data collected from a sample of 637 participants are used to examine the research model and test the hypotheses with the employment of partial least squares structural equation modeling.

Findings

The study shows that motivations and perceived behavioral control are significant predictors of intention. Perceived behavioral control has a significant moderating effect between motivations and intention. Intrinsic motivation is positively influenced by self-perceived facial attractiveness, agreeableness, extraversion and internal locus of control, while extrinsic motivation is positively predicted by self-perceived facial attractiveness, conscientiousness and extraversion.

Originality/value

This study enhances our understanding of the determinants of intention toward live stream broadcasting by exploring its relationships with motivations, self-perceived facial attractiveness and personality, as well as the moderating effects of perceived behavioral control.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2012

Chih-Fu Cheng, Lung Hung Chen, Mei-Yen Chen and Wan-Chen Lu

Watching sporting events is a popular leisure activity. However, in the context of sports marketing, little is known about the mechanism that determines fans'…

Abstract

Watching sporting events is a popular leisure activity. However, in the context of sports marketing, little is known about the mechanism that determines fans' game-attending behaviour. This study aims to investigate fan participation in the context of baseball, using the theory of planned behaviour. The 623 subjects of this study were recruited from the Chinese Professional Baseball League in Taiwan. The structural equation indicates that attitude and perceived behavioural control will have an influence on gameattending behaviour through behavioural intention. However, subjective norms do not significantly predict behavioural intention, nor do perceived behavioural controls significantly predict game-attending behaviour. The results are discussed in terms of their applicability to fan behaviour.

Details

International Journal of Sports Marketing and Sponsorship, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1464-6668

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 19 September 2008

Hanneke Heinsman, Annebel H.B. de Hoogh, Paul L. Koopman and Jaap J. van Muijen

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effects of the commitment‐ and control‐approaches on the use of competency management, and to investigate whether attitude…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effects of the commitment‐ and control‐approaches on the use of competency management, and to investigate whether attitude, subjective norm and perceived behavioural control mediate these effects.

Design/methodology/approach

In Study 1, using a survey, employees indicated whether their organization adopted a commitment‐ or a control‐approach towards competency management. Moreover, they rated their own attitude, subjective norm, perceived behavioural control, and behaviour. In Study 2 a scenario experiment was conducted in which the authors manipulated the commitment‐ and control‐approaches towards competency management in order to establish causal relations.

Findings

Results consistently showed that the use of competency management is higher within a commitment‐ than within a control‐approach. Furthermore, attitude and perceived behavioural control were found to mediate the relationship between the commitment‐approach and the use of competency management.

Research limitations/implications

Future research should include other organizational members, for example (line) managers, to create future insight in the effects of commitment‐ and control‐approaches on the use of competency management.

Practical implications

The results of the studies highlight that a commitment‐oriented approach increases the use of competency management by employees and that a positive employee attitude and perceived behavioural control are of considerable importance when increasing the use of competency management is an organization's primary goal.

Originality/value

The paper gives insight in how to persuade and stimulate employees to use competency management more frequently.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 37 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 20 November 2007

Elizabeth White Baker, Said S. Al‐Gahtani and Geoffrey S. Hubona

This paper aims to investigate the effects of gender, age and education on new technology implementation in Saudi Arabia, a technologically developing country, using the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the effects of gender, age and education on new technology implementation in Saudi Arabia, a technologically developing country, using the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB).

Design/methodology/approach

The research was an empirical investigation based on surveys completed by 1,088 Saudi knowledge workers.

Findings

The TPB model performs well in Saudi Arabia. This validation accounts for 37 percent of the variance in behavioral intention among Saudi knowledge workers. For the moderator variables, there were no statistically significant interactions, with the exception of the moderation of perceived behavioral control on behavioral intention by level of education.

Research limitations/implications

Saudi Arabia is an exemplar for many developing nations characterized by distinct intellectual and cultural traditions that differ from Western cultures. Demographic variables (e.g. gender and age) that have been reported to be significant moderators of the influences of attitude, subjective norm and perceived behavioral control on behavioral intention in other cultural samples were found to be non‐significant in this Saudi Arabian sample.

Practical implications

System developers using user‐centered design approaches have different design criteria for the successful workforce adoption of information technology (IT) systems in a technologically developing nation, as compared to the workforce of a technologically developed nation.

Originality/value

This paper validates TPB as a multi‐cultural model for investigating the impact of attitudes, beliefs, and subjective norms on technology adoption, and, in contrast to previous studies, indicates the (non)effects of select demographic moderators on the model using a non‐Western sample.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 21 September 2015

Prabanga Thoradeniya, Janet Lee, Rebecca Tan and Aldónio Ferreira

Drawing upon the theory of planned behaviour (TPB), the purpose of this paper is to examine the influence of managers’ attitude and other psychological factors on…

Abstract

Purpose

Drawing upon the theory of planned behaviour (TPB), the purpose of this paper is to examine the influence of managers’ attitude and other psychological factors on sustainability reporting (SR). In doing so, this paper aims to respond to calls for the use of previously untried theoretical approaches on the SR literature.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses a survey of top and middle-level managers of listed and non-listed companies in Sri Lanka. Data were analysed using a Partial Least Squares path model.

Findings

The findings indicate that managers’ attitude towards SR, belief about stakeholder pressure, and their capacity to control SR behaviour influence their intention to engage in SR and, indirectly, actual corporate SR behaviour (in the context of listed companies). However, whilst managers of non-listed companies exhibit the intention to engage in SR, the lack of a relationship between intention and behaviour suggests that companies face barriers towards SR due to lack of actual control over the SR process. Religion, in the case of non-listed companies, and education, in the case of listed companies, has some degree of influence over managers’ beliefs.

Research limitations/implications

The use of self-reported SR behaviour is a limitation but necessary to maintain anonymity of respondents. The low levels of self-reported SR correspond with past evidence on actual SR in developing countries.

Practical implications

The results show that managers’ psychological factors are important in determining SR behaviour in companies. Specifically, this highlights the possible roles that regulators, professional bodies and companies can play in improving educational and cultural influences towards improving the level of SR.

Originality/value

This is the first study to apply the TPB to understand SR behaviour by integrating psychological factors relating to managers’ belief, attitudes and perceptions.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 28 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 6 May 2020

Md. Shah Newaz, Mina Hemmati, Muhammad Khalilur Rahman and Suhaiza Zailani

This study aims to investigate how the employees' attributes, capabilities, behavioral control and behavioral intentions affect their intention to become a supply chain…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate how the employees' attributes, capabilities, behavioral control and behavioral intentions affect their intention to become a supply chain manager (SCM). The study also investigates how employees' capabilities mediate the relationship between attributes and intention to become SCM.

Design/methodology/approach

The purposive sampling frame is employed to collect the data, and multiple statistical tools and techniques are used for analyzing the data.

Findings

The findings reveal that attributes are the most crucial factor for the capabilities of employees to become successful SCM. Employees' behavioral intention and capabilities have a significant impact on intention, whereas perceived behavioral control has a significant negative impact on it. Also, the result finds that capabilities partially mediate the relationship between attributes and intention to become an SCM.

Research limitations/implications

The study extends the application of employees' intention to become a supply chain manager. The idea collected is based on Malaysia; thus, further study should be extended to assess the impact of employees' attributes, capabilities and behavioral control to become SCM as well as economic performance in other countries.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first empirical analysis on the relationship between employees' attributes, capabilities, behavioral control and intention to become SCM in the context of Malaysia. The findings will help the top management to select the right people as SCM and improve their attributes, capabilities and behavior so that they become an effective SCM.

Details

Journal of Advances in Management Research, vol. 17 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0972-7981

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 11 June 2018

Norazah Mohd Suki and Abang Sulaiman Abang Salleh

Muslim consumers’ tendency to patronize stores with Halal images and purchase genuine Halal products is closely related to their effort to maintain Islamic identity, and…

Abstract

Purpose

Muslim consumers’ tendency to patronize stores with Halal images and purchase genuine Halal products is closely related to their effort to maintain Islamic identity, and this is further supported by many empirical data. Therefore, this paper aims to examine the relationships between attitude, subjective norm, perceived behavioral control and Halal principle knowledge and their effect on Muslim consumers’ behavioral intention to patronize retail stores. On top of that, the mediating effect of Halal image on these relationships is also investigated.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were analyzed using multiple and hierarchical regression analysis to test the model via the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) software among 480 valid samples of Muslim consumers.

Findings

Empirical results of the hierarchical regression analysis and the Sobel test revealed that there is a significant mediating effect of Halal image on the relationship between consumers’ attitude, subjective norm and perceived behavioral control of consumers’ behavioral intention to patronize retail stores. Consumers with high attentiveness of the stores’ Halal image have a positive impression of the stores, a high motivation to patronize and, without any conditions, may follow through their intention to patronize the retail stores.

Practical implications

This research study offers guidelines to the retailers, marketers and the authorities in enhancing marketing strategies and the implementation of stricter Halal consumption laws. Hence, this research puts forward the following strategies: adopting Halal marketing strategy, promoting Halal images in retail stores and reinforcing Halal principle knowledge in the mind of consumers.

Originality/value

The main theoretical contribution relates to the insertion of the Halal image as a mediating variable in the matter of Muslim consumers’ behavioral intention to patronize Halal stores in Malaysia. An inspection of the effect of Halal principle knowledge on Muslim consumers’ behavioral intention to patronize retail stores is also rewarding.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

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