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Article
Publication date: 8 April 2020

Amy Dorie and David Loranger

The aim of this research is to advance the understanding of multi-channel behaviour in terms of different generational cohorts' usage and spending patterns.

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Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this research is to advance the understanding of multi-channel behaviour in terms of different generational cohorts' usage and spending patterns.

Design/methodology/approach

Building on previous studies on multi-channel behaviour, differences in shopping channel usage and purchase amounts were investigated between baby boomers, Gen X, xennials and millennials.

Findings

There were significant differences found between the generations in terms of multi-channel behaviour regarding purchasing frequency and average purchase amounts via a) mobile phone, b) tablet, c) computer, d) social media and e) brick-and-mortar. Fewer differences were found amongst the generational cohorts in terms of amount spent per channel.

Research limitations/implications

The research was successful in analysing variances in multi-channel behaviour amongst the baby boomer, Generation X, xennial and millennial cohorts, while updating the body of literature to consider generational channel usage of mobile and social media in multi-channel retailing.

Practical implications

Marketers should consider xennials’ channel behaviour and focus on converting sales through integrated programmes based on their channel usage. Retailers should also consider millennials' heavy engagement with social media in their lives but spend lower amounts via the medium, which may be an opportunity to use this medium as a viable stand-alone channel in targeting millennials' shopping dollars.

Originality/value

This study updates the body of research on multi-channel behaviour by considering generation as a factor in channel usage and spend amount.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 48 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 March 2022

Adriana Gorea, Amy Dorie and Martha L. Hall

This study aims to investigate if engineered compression variations using moisture-responsive knitted fabric design can improve breast support in seamless knitted sports bras.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate if engineered compression variations using moisture-responsive knitted fabric design can improve breast support in seamless knitted sports bras.

Design/methodology/approach

An experimental approach was used to integrate a novel moisture-responsive fabric panel into a seamless knitted bra, and the resulting compression variability in dry versus wet conditions were compared with those of a control bra. Air permeability and elongation testing of between breasts fabric panels was conducted in dry and wet conditions, followed by three-dimensional body scanning of eight human participants wearing the two bras in similar conditions. Questionnaires were used to evaluate perceived comfort and breast support of both bras in both conditions.

Findings

Air permeability test results showed that the novel panel had the highest variance between dry and wet conditions, confirming its moisture-responsive design, and increased its elongation coefficient in both wale and course directions in wet condition. There were significant main effects of bra type and body location on breast compression measurements. Breast circumferences in the novel bra were significantly larger than in the control bra condition. The significant two-way interaction between bra type and moisture condition showed that the control bra lost compressive power in wet condition, whereas the novel bra became more compressive when wet. Changes in compression were confirmed by participants’ perception of tighter straps and drier breast comfort.

Originality/value

These findings add to the limited scientific knowledge of moisture adaptive bra design using engineered knitted fabrics via advanced manufacturing technologies, with possible applications beyond sports bras, such as bras for breast surgery recovering patients.

Details

Research Journal of Textile and Apparel, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1560-6074

Keywords

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