Search results

1 – 10 of 117
Article
Publication date: 1 April 2020

Amelia Green and Steffen Gray

The purpose of this paper is to begin unfurling the cultural value of street art experiences by opening up an audience-centred research stream sensitive to the nuances of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to begin unfurling the cultural value of street art experiences by opening up an audience-centred research stream sensitive to the nuances of this art form.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper develops a two-part model through which to investigate how everyday citizens experience street art. The methodology involves a purposeful literature review, and direct assessment of how the nuances of street art could pertain to audience experiences.

Findings

The first part of the model conceptualises the characteristics that distinguish contemporary street art from other art forms. To help further guide future research, the second part distinguishes six layers that frame street art audience experiences: (1) “the art”, (2) artist's intentions for the art, (3) the street artist, (4) experiential context, (5) social contexts and (6) audience interpretive lenses.

Research limitations/implications

The investigative model provides a constructive stimulus for substantive empirical inquiries into the dynamics, complexities and implications of everyday street art experiences.

Practical implications

The research stream developed could inform appropriate approaches to facilitating street art, and collaboration amongst street artists, facilitators, municipal representatives and policymakers.

Originality/value

The paper helps to open up an audience-centred approach to street art that intersects with recent developments in arts experience, cultural value and arts marketing.

Details

Arts and the Market, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4945

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 November 2020

Amelia Green

This paper aims to explore the capacity of Australian silo art from a creative placemaking perspective. The paper also takes up this case as fertile ground for probing…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the capacity of Australian silo art from a creative placemaking perspective. The paper also takes up this case as fertile ground for probing into the complexity of creative placemaking.

Design/methodology/approach

The case study approach is exploratory, drawing on public documents and media sources to thematically (i.e. qualitatively) analyse the factors, actors and processes that pertain to how Australian silo art can contribute towards empowering communities, activating everyday spaces and, ultimately, making socially connected and resilient places.

Findings

Each theme encapsulates a particular interplay: (1) physical space – social place, (2) past – present – future place, (3) bottom-up – top-down energies, (4) residents – tourists, (5) urban – nonurban place and (6) material – digital place.

Research limitations/implications

Rather than proffering conclusions about the current impact of silo art on local communities, the paper illuminates the practical workings of silo art as a potential form of creative placemaking. Additionally, thinking of creative placemaking in terms of ongoing interplays could stimulate and expand knowledge and practice in this domain.

Originality/value

This paper initiates and charts a course for a rigorous and critical investigation into silo art as a substantive cultural and artistic phenomenon and a meaningful chapter in regional arts and creative placemaking in Australia. The interplays distinguished provide an additional basis for probing further into the many layers and overall complexity of creative placemaking.

Details

Journal of Place Management and Development, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8335

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 March 2009

Lillian Schumacher, Jane V. Wheeler and Amelia S. Carr

The purpose of this paper is to explore the relationship between buyer's emotional intelligence and buyer's relationship performance.

4283

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the relationship between buyer's emotional intelligence and buyer's relationship performance.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey methodology was used to collect data for this study. The survey was administered using an assessment process which incorporated “buyers'” and “suppliers'” assessment for the independent variable, emotional intelligence, and the dependent variable, relationship performance. The respondents consisted of 34 buyers and 102 suppliers.

Findings

Correlation and regression analysis revealed several significant relationships between the variables. Specifically, buyers' self‐assessed emotional intelligence was not significantly related to buyers' self‐assessed relationship performance. Buyers' emotional intelligence assessed by suppliers was significantly related to buyers' relationship performance assessed by suppliers. Buyers' emotional intelligence (as assessed by buyers and suppliers' assessment differences) was not significantly related to buyers' self‐assessed relationship performance. Last, buyers' emotional intelligence (as assessed by buyers' and suppliers' assessment differences) was significantly related to buyers' relationship performance (as assessed by buyers' and suppliers' assessment differences). Thus, the results suggest that buyers' emotional intelligence is positively related to relationship performance, most significantly from the perspective of their key suppliers.

Originality/value

This study is the first to introduce emotional intelligence within an environment that consisted of individuals working with others outside of their respective organizations (buyers and suppliers). This research offers some insight to buyers on the implications of emotional intelligence and how it can be used to support their interactions with their key suppliers.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 24 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Tweeting the Environment #Brexit
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-502-9

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 44 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

Abstract

Details

Tweeting the Environment #Brexit
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-502-9

Article
Publication date: 28 October 2010

Amelia S. Carr, Man Zhang, Inge Klopping and Hokey Min

The primary purpose of this paper is to investigate the healthcare organization’s intention to use radio frequency identification (RFID) technology for improving…

1394

Abstract

The primary purpose of this paper is to investigate the healthcare organization’s intention to use radio frequency identification (RFID) technology for improving efficiency. This paper also intends to identify various factors that influence the adoption of RFID in the healthcare organization. This paper develops and tests seven different hypotheses. These hypotheses are tested using structural equation modeling. Our results provide support for a number of relationships in the hypothesized model. These include direct relationships among the factors risk, resistance to change, supplier support and the factor perceived usefulness. However, the study did not find support for the relationship between the factors perceived ease of use and intention to use. The results provide support for several indirect relationships as well. These include indirect relationships between the factors perceived resistance to change, risk, suppliers’ support and perceived ease of use with the factor intention to adopt RFID technology in the healthcare organization. This research is grounded in the theory of reasoned action and applies the technology acceptance model (TAM) to the healthcare organization’s intention to use RFID technology.

Details

American Journal of Business, vol. 25 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1935-5181

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 September 2021

Chad Joseph Rutkowski, Karen Eboch, Amelia Carr and Bertie Marie Greer

This study aims to highlight and validate the importance of strategic procurement and its value to both public and private firms. This study discusses a collaborative…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to highlight and validate the importance of strategic procurement and its value to both public and private firms. This study discusses a collaborative private-public partnership (PPP), supply chain advisory committee (SCAC), established during the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic to acquire personal protective equipment (PPE) and other critical supplies for a donation center in Toledo, Ohio, USA. This center serves the community and small businesses. This paper discusses the strategies, process and framework that were created to procure the needed items under a short lead time. The process of the partnership and outcomes are transferable and capable of being used by others to benefit society.

Design/methodology/approach

The case study methodology was used to investigate and summarize the actions and events of the SCAC. The case presented was tracked from the initial call to action from a local emergency response organization, Lucas County Emergency Operation Center (EOC), through the first six months of the committee’s work. Data collection was completed through a triangulation of sources.

Findings

The findings of this study reveal that public firms are vulnerable in a crisis. A crisis exposes the inequities in the supply chain and the need for public and private collaboration to use innovative procurement strategies. This study suggests that PPP procurement professionals benefit from working together. Both can learn from the limitations and benefits of collaborating.

Practical implications

This study offers a framework on how PPPs can be established to procure PPE during a crisis. This study has practical implications for private and public firms seeking to collaborate for the good of society.

Social implications

The findings of the study reveal that public firms are vulnerable in a crisis, which exposes the inequities in their supply chains. Private-public partnership (PPP) procurement professionals mutually benefit from working together as both can learn from each whether it is procuring PPE during a crisis or seeking to team up for the good of society. Society benefits when these organizations share solutions to problems rather than compete against one another during a crisis-situation such as a global pandemic. Supplies get to those who need them the most and information flows amongst the organizations to ensure equity in the availability of the supplies.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the growing body of literature that argues that public procurement must be innovative and strategic to contribute to socially responsible solutions. Government regulations require public procurement to use competitive bidding for accountability, cost reduction and to reduce fraud. However, emergency situations require innovative procurement strategies. The use of innovative procurement strategies is typical in private procurement. During a crisis, supplier relationships, lead-time management and shared and transfer of knowledge must be leveraged to acquire critical items in a timely manner. A lack of innovative public procurement strategies constrains the public and small under resourced businesses, rendering them inoperable. This paper provides a case study of an effective PPP during the COVID-19 pandemic. This paper highlights the strategies, process and framework for future research and collaborations.

Details

Journal of Public Procurement, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1535-0118

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 24 February 2021

Amélia Brandão and Ana Gonçalves da Costa

Extending the theory of planned behaviour (TPB), this paper aims to measure the relative importance of different barriers to sustainable fashion consumption (SFC).

8973

Abstract

Purpose

Extending the theory of planned behaviour (TPB), this paper aims to measure the relative importance of different barriers to sustainable fashion consumption (SFC).

Design/methodology/approach

Existing studies have mainly adopted a qualitative methodology for identifying barriers to uptake of SFC, this study uses six of the main identified barriers: environmental apparel knowledge, perceived value, price sensitivity, product attributes and variety, availability and scepticism into the TPB framework to test and reveal which barriers have the greater impact on the TPB cognitions and consequently on building intention towards SFC. To test this model a survey study among 669 consumers from Europe, Asian and North America was conducted, structural equation modelling is used to test the research hypotheses.

Findings

Findings confirm the role of TPB cognitions on predicting intention and show that the proposed barriers provide a satisfactory explanation of the TPB model. Furthermore, results show that product attributes and variety and environmental apparel knowledge have the greatest impact on the TPB cognitions and on building intention towards SFC. Differences were found between the impacts of the price for the three continents.

Originality/value

This research contributes to the emerging sustainable fashion literature by examining the impact of different barriers to SFC in an extended TPB framework. To the best of our knowledge price sensitivity, availability and scepticism have never been studied in the context of sustainable fashion. It also provides a multifactor group analysis which uncovers differences among consumers from different continents.

Details

European Business Review, vol. 33 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-534X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 August 2008

Amelia S. Carr, Hale Kaynak, Janet L. Hartley and Anthony Ross

The purpose of this paper is to extend our understanding of the importance of supplier dependence on the buyer's firm and its relationship to supplier training and…

5923

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to extend our understanding of the importance of supplier dependence on the buyer's firm and its relationship to supplier training and supplier involvement in product development with respect to the supplier's performance.

Design/methodology/approach

A random sample of 231 firms provided the data that were analyzed for this study. Using structural equation modeling, a sub‐set of the sample consisting of 166 manufacturing firms was used to test the five hypothesized relationships in the model.

Findings

The main findings indicate that supplier dependence is a significant contributor to increasing supplier participation in buyer supported training and increasing supplier involvement in product development. Also, supplier training and supplier involvement are significant contributors to the supplier's operational performance.

Research limitations/implications

The model tested in this study used a random sample of US manufacturing firms. Thus, future studies should include a random sample of non‐manufacturing firms and firms outside of the USA. The study explored the buyer's perspective only; a study of suppliers may provide further insights to extend this study. Although the use of supplier training was relatively low, significant relationships were identified.

Practical implications

Based on this research, key suppliers can better understand the relationships among supplier dependence, supplier training, supplier involvement in product development and their effects on supplier's operational performance.

Originality/value

Although supplier development has emerged in previously published studies as a critical factor in improving performance, the role of supplier dependence on the buyer has not been empirically examined. Further, an integrated research model that investigates the relationships among supplier dependence, supplier training, supplier involvement in product development and supplier's operational performance has not been offered.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 28 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

1 – 10 of 117