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Article
Publication date: 5 April 2013

Elisha Ondieki Makori

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the adoption of radio frequency identification (RFID) technology in handling and supporting information services and activities…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the adoption of radio frequency identification (RFID) technology in handling and supporting information services and activities in Kenyan university libraries.

Design/methodology/approach

The study utilized a survey research design to collect data, ideas, opinions, views and suggestions from the respondents drawn from various university libraries in Kenya. Collecting data and getting in‐depth information from the respondents was done using a web‐based structured questionnaire, document analysis and participant observation.

Findings

The findings from the study show that few university libraries in Kenya are using radio frequency identification technology to handle and support information services and activities. The study also found various problems hindering the adoption of the technology, such as a lack of information communication technology (ICT) policies, lack of a business approach, limited market opportunities, lack of lobbying or negotiating skills, inadequate funding and budgeting, and lack of ICT competencies and skills. The study recommends that library ICT professionals, information professionals and other stakeholders should make tireless efforts to implement and use RFID technology with the view to building, strengthening, improving and supporting information work and activities in university libraries.

Research limitations/implications

The study involved RFID technology, a relatively new and emerging innovation in university library and information systems, especially in the Kenyan context. The study also involved university libraries in Kenya that provide and support the fundamental functions of their respective universities.

Practical implications

Fundamentally, library ICT professionals, information professionals and other stakeholders need to take appropriate measures to address issues affecting the use of RFID solutions. There is a need to empower university libraries and information professionals with the right mix of ICT knowledge and skills necessary in the modern information environment.

Social implications

Across the world, university libraries are increasingly adopting and implementing RFID solutions in order to handle and support information work and activities. Of critical importance to the discussion is the extent to which university libraries in Kenya are using this technology to handle and support information work and activities effectively and efficiently. Proper management of library operations and services is necessary in university library and information systems.

Originality/value

The focus of the study was to assess the extent to which university libraries in Kenya are adopting and using RFID systems in information work and activities. This research is useful in providing a point of reference for university libraries and information professionals, increasingly going for similar solutions in Kenya and Africa in general.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 31 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 30 May 2011

Martin Zimerman

The purpose of this paper is to show that there may currently be more motivation to move towards a modern RFID system for libraries

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to show that there may currently be more motivation to move towards a modern RFID system for libraries

Design/methodology/approach

The paper takes the form of a literature review.

Findings

The author finds that prices for RFID chips and equipment have dropped significantly.

Practical implications]

In these harsh economic times libraries need to use purchasing funds wisely. RFID is a method of accomplishing more, possibly for less money.

Originality/value

With more personnel being laid off every day, libraries need to be innovative in using technology, and cost‐effective. RFID, once set up, can place the burden of cataloging, circulation and collection management on the computer rather than on staff.

Details

OCLC Systems & Services: International digital library perspectives, vol. 27 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1065-075X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2005

Peter Jones, Colin Clarke‐Hill, David Hillier and Daphne Comfort

To offer an outline of the characteristics of radio frequency identification technology (RFID) and discuss its perceived benefits, impacts and challenges, as they apply to…

Abstract

Purpose

To offer an outline of the characteristics of radio frequency identification technology (RFID) and discuss its perceived benefits, impacts and challenges, as they apply to retailers in the UK. The paper draws together a range of information and intelligence about the application of RFID and reflects on the strategic planning challenges it poses to retailers.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper draws its material largely from trade and practitioner sources and illustrates general themes with specific retail examples.

Findings

The paper suggests that RFID has the potential to deliver a wide range of benefits throughout the supply chain, including tighter management and control, reduction in shrinkage, reduced labour costs and improved customer service. However, retail users will have to address a number of operational and strategic challenges and consumer privacy concerns before these benefits can be fully realised. The adoption of RFID may further increase structural concentration within the retail sector of the economy, and have a major impact on retail operations at shop floor level and on the customers' shopping experience.

Originality/value

An accessible outline of RFID developments within UK retailing, of interest to marketing professionals and academics concerned with marketing practice. A companion piece to the paper by Wyld et al. in this issue.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 23 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 9 November 2010

Joseph Barjis and Samuel Fosso Wamba

The purpose of this paper is to briefly discuss some aspects of radio frequency identification (RFID) technology, potential applications, and challenges including…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to briefly discuss some aspects of radio frequency identification (RFID) technology, potential applications, and challenges including scientific methods that will help to study the impacts of RFID implementation on businesses.

Design/methodology/approach

As an introductory paper, this paper conducts a brief literature review, provides personal reflection on RFID technology, and consolidates expert opinions.

Findings

This paper identifies a set of research topics that seem relevant for a large‐scale implementation of RFID systems. It brings up the importance of business impacts as a result of new RFID systems introduced to organizations.

Originality/value

The paper is original in the sense that it combines literature review, personal reflections, and expert opinions to draw a set of research topics that contribute to both acceptance and large‐scale implementation of RFID systems.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 16 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 7 June 2021

Syed Asif Raza

The findings of this paper throw light on the focal research areas within RFID in the supply chain, which serves as an effective guideline for future research in this…

Abstract

Purpose

The findings of this paper throw light on the focal research areas within RFID in the supply chain, which serves as an effective guideline for future research in this area. This research, therefore, contributes to filling the gap by carrying out an SLR of contemporary research studies in the area of RFID applications in supply chains. To date, SLR augmented with BA has not been used to study the developments in RFID applications in supply chains.

Design/methodology/approach

We analyze 556 articles from years 2001 to date using Systematic Literature Review (SLR). Contemporary bibliometric analysis (BA) tools are utilized. First, an exploratory analysis is carried, out revealing influential authors, sources, regions, among other key aspects. Second, a co-citation work analysis is utilized to understand the conceptual structure of the literature, followed by a dynamic co-citation network to reveal the evolution of the field. This is followed by a multivariate analysis is performed on top-100 cited papers, and k-means clustering is carried out to find optimal groups and identify research themes. The influential themes are then pointed out using factor analysis.

Findings

An exploratory analysis is carried out using BA tools to provide insights into factors such as influential authors, production countries, top-cited papers and frequent keywords. Visualization of bibliographical data using co-citation network analysis and keyword co-occurrence analysis assisted in understanding the groups (communities) of research themes. We employed k-means clustering and factor analysis methods to further develop these insights. A historiographical direct citation analysis also unveils potential research directions. We observe that RFID applications in the supply chain are likely to benefit from the Internet of Things and blockchain Technology along with the other machine learning and visualization approaches.

Originality/value

Although several researchers have researched RFID literature in relation to supply chains, these reviews are often conducted in the traditional manner where the author(s) select paper based on their area of expertise, interest and experience. Limitation of such reviews includes authors’ selection bias of studies to be included and limited or no use of advanced BA tools for analysis. This study fills this research gap by conducting an SLR of RFID in supply chains to identify important research trends in this field through the use of advanced BA tools.

Details

Journal of Enterprise Information Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0398

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 19 March 2021

Honggang Wang, Ruixue Yu, Ruoyu Pan, Mengyuan Liu, Qiongdan Huang and Jingfeng Yang

In manufacturing environments, mobile radio frequency identification (RFID) robots need to quickly identify and collect various types of passive tag and active tag sensor…

Abstract

Purpose

In manufacturing environments, mobile radio frequency identification (RFID) robots need to quickly identify and collect various types of passive tag and active tag sensor data. The purpose of this paper is to design a robot system compatible with ultra high frequency (UHF) band passive and active RFID applications and to propose a new anti-collision protocol to improve identification efficiency for active tag data collection.

Design/methodology/approach

A new UHF RFID robot system based on a cloud platform is designed and verified. For the active RFID system, a grouping reservation–based anti-collision algorithm is proposed in which an inventory round is divided into reservation period and polling period. The reservation period is divided into multiple sub-slots. Grouped tags complete sub-slot by randomly transmitting a short reservation frame. Then, in the polling period, the reader accesses each tag by polling. When tags’ reply collision occurs, the reader tries to re-query collided tags once, and the pre-reply tags avoid collisions through random back-off and channel activity detection.

Findings

The proposed algorithm achieves a maximum theoretical system throughput of about 0.94, and very few tag data frame transmissions overhead. The capture effect and channel activity detection in physical layer can effectively improve system throughput and reduce tag data transmission.

Originality/value

In this paper, the authors design and verify the UHF band passive and active hybrid RFID robot architecture based on cloud collaboration. And, the proposed anti-collision algorithm would improve active tag data collection speed and reduce tag transmission overhead in complex manufacturing environments.

Details

Assembly Automation, vol. 41 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-5154

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 19 March 2020

Vicky Ching Gu and Ken Black

Despite the extensive adoption of radio-frequency identification (RFID) technology across many industry supply chains, the extent of adoption in healthcare is far behind…

Abstract

Purpose

Despite the extensive adoption of radio-frequency identification (RFID) technology across many industry supply chains, the extent of adoption in healthcare is far behind the earlier expectation. The purpose of this study is to better understand the current RFID adoption in healthcare by looking beyond the existing body of work using both the task-technology fit (TTF) framework and network externalities theories.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey is employed in this study, and the structural equation modeling (SEM) technique is used to test the hypotheses of the proposed model.

Findings

The findings are twofold. First, both TTF and network externalities exert a positive impact on the RFID adoption in the healthcare sector; and second, no synergistic effect can be found between these two for further increasing the adoption. This is different from what the extant research found on other technology adoptions across various supply chains.

Originality/value

This paper provides contributions to both researchers and practitioners. For researchers, this study enriches the body of knowledge of RFID adoption by being the first to apply the network externalities and TTF theories to predict the adoption of RFID in healthcare. For healthcare practitioners, to make the RFID adoption easier and more effective, any initial applications of RFID tools should be centered on those for which there is a more natural application. Further, for those who propose an RFID adoption should start with a product that has a sizable adoption community; this may help persuade senior management to make the adoption decision.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. 70 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 9 June 2020

Qian Chen, Bryan T. Adey, Carl Haas and Daniel M. Hall

Building information modelling (BIM) and radio frequency identification (RFID) technologies have been extensively explored to improve supply chain visibility and…

Abstract

Purpose

Building information modelling (BIM) and radio frequency identification (RFID) technologies have been extensively explored to improve supply chain visibility and coordination of material flow processes, particularly in the pursuit of Industry 4.0. It remains challenging, however, to effectively use these technologies to enable the precise and reliable coordination of material flow processes. This paper aims to propose a new workflow designed to include the use of detailed look-ahead plans when using BIM and RFID technologies, which can accurately track and match both the dynamic site needs and supply status of materials.

Design/methodology/approach

The new workflow is designed according to lean theory and is modeled using business process modeling notation. To digitally support the workflow, an integrated BIM-RFID database system is constructed that links information on material demands with look-ahead plans. The new workflow is then used to manage material flows in the erection of an office building with prefabricated columns. The performance of the new workflow is compared with that of a traditional workflow, using discrete event simulations. The input for the simulations was derived from expert opinion in semi-structured interviews.

Findings

The new workflow enables contractors to better observe on-site status and differences between the actual and planned material requirements, as well as to alert suppliers if necessary. The simulation results indicate that the new workflow has the potential to reduce the duration of the material flow processes by 16.1% compared with the traditional workflow.

Research limitations/implications

The new workflow is illustrated using a real-world-like situation with input data based on expert opinion. Although the workflow shows potential, it should be tested on a real-world site.

Practical implications

The new workflow allows project participants to combine detailed near-term look-ahead plans with BIM and RFID technologies to better manage material flow processes. It is particularly useful for the management of engineer-to-order components considering the dynamic site progress.

Originality/value

The research improves on existing research focused on using BIM and RFID technologies to improve material flow processes by showing how the workflow can be adapted to use detailed look-ahead plans. It reinforces data-driven construction material management practices through improved visibility and reliability in planning and control of material flow processes.

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2010

Björn Kvarnström and Erik Vanhatalo

The purpose of the paper is to explore the application of radio frequency identification (RFID) to improve traceability in a flow of granular products and to illustrate…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the paper is to explore the application of radio frequency identification (RFID) to improve traceability in a flow of granular products and to illustrate examples of special issues that need to be considered when using the RFID technique in a process industry setting.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper outlines a case study at a Swedish mining company, including experiments to test the suitability of RFID to trace iron ore pellets (a granular product) in parts of the distribution chain.

Findings

The results show that the RFID technique can be used to improve traceability in granular product flows. A number of special issues concerning the use of RFID in process industries are also highlighted, for example, the problems to control the orientation of the transponder in the read area and the risk of product contamination in the supply chain.

Research limitations/implications

Even though only a single case has been studied, the results are of a general interest for industries that have granular product flows. However, future research in other industries should be performed to validate the results.

Practical implications

The application of RFID described in this paper makes it possible to increase productivity and product quality by improving traceability in product flows where traceability normally is problematic.

Originality/value

Prior research has mainly focused on RFID applications in discontinuous processes. By contrast, this paper presents a novel application of the RFID technique in a continuous process together with specific issues connected to the use of RFID.

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 22 March 2013

Kazim Sari

The purpose of this paper is to provide a comprehensive framework to help managers of a business enterprise effectively evaluate candidate RFID solution providers and then…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a comprehensive framework to help managers of a business enterprise effectively evaluate candidate RFID solution providers and then select the most suitable one.

Design/methodology/approach

The selection of an RFID solution provider is modeled as a new hybrid fuzzy multi‐criteria decision making problem. The proposed decision model is based on integration of Monte Carlo simulation with fuzzy analytic hierarchy process (AHP) and fuzzy Technique for Order Preference by Similarity to Ideal Solution (TOPSIS) methods. In addition, an illustrative case is used to exemplify the proposed approach.

Findings

A quantitative methodology based on a structured framework, for the selection of the most appropriate RFID solution provider.

Practical implications

This research study is a very useful source of information for managers of a business enterprise in making decisions about evaluation and selection of RFID solution providers or RFID system integrators.

Originality/value

This study addresses the evaluation and selection of RFID solution providers for the managers of a business enterprise and proposes a new hybrid decision‐making methodology for the problem.

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