Search results

1 – 10 of over 25000
Content available
Article
Publication date: 7 July 2021

Lena Ansmann, Vera Vennedey, Hendrik Ansgar Hillen, Stephanie Stock, Ludwig Kuntz, Holger Pfaff, Russell Mannion and Kira Isabel Hower

Healthcare systems are under pressure to improve their performance, while at the same time facing severe resource constraints, particularly workforce shortages. By…

Abstract

Purpose

Healthcare systems are under pressure to improve their performance, while at the same time facing severe resource constraints, particularly workforce shortages. By applying resource-dependency-theory (RDT), we explore how healthcare organizations in different settings perceive pressure arising from uncertain access to resources and examine organizational strategies they deploy to secure resources.

Design/methodology/approach

A cross-sectional survey of key decision-makers in different healthcare settings in the metropolitan area of Cologne, Germany, on perceptions of pressure arising from the environment and respective strategies was conducted. For comparisons between settings radar charts, Kruskal–Wallis test and Fisher–Yates test were applied. Additionally, correlation analyses were conducted.

Findings

A sample of n = 237(13%) key informants participated and reported high pressure caused by bureaucracy, time constraints and recruiting qualified staff. Hospitals, inpatient and outpatient nursing care organizations felt most pressurized. As suggested by RDT, organizations in highly pressurized settings deployed the most vociferous strategies to secure resources, particularly in relation to personnel development.

Originality/value

This study is one of the few studies that focuses on the environment's impact on healthcare organizations across a variety of settings. RDT is a helpful theoretical foundation for understanding the environment's impact on organizational strategies. The substantial variations found between healthcare settings indicate that those settings potentially require specific strategies when seeking to address scarce resources and high demands. The results draw attention to the high level of pressure on healthcare organizations which presumably is passed down to managers, healthcare professionals, patients and relatives.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 35 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 6 June 2006

Annabelle Mark

This paper looks at the current portrayal of emotion in healthcare as delivered within formal organisational settings, notably the UK National Health Service (NHS). Its…

Abstract

This paper looks at the current portrayal of emotion in healthcare as delivered within formal organisational settings, notably the UK National Health Service (NHS). Its purpose is to set out some examples of the problems and suggest new ways of conceptualising issues that will assist healthcare organisations in gaining a better understanding of the role of emotion and its impact, using appropriate examples. Developing understanding of the location of emotion and its differing constructions indicates that interdisciplinary and interpersonal boundaries differentiate interpretations of emotion, often for instrumental purpose as examples drawn particularly from the Public Inquiry into Paediatric Cardiology at Bristol Royal Infirmary (The Kennedy Report) demonstrate. The privileging of rationality over emotion as part of the dominant paradigm within the healthcare domain is shown to affect outcomes. However, the boundaries between organisations and individuals are changing, so are the location, access, technologies and timing of activities, and these are reconstructing healthcare organisation and the patient's experience of healthcare at both rational and emotional levels. It is suggested that in healthcare it is the patients’ journey through their lives (the macro context), as well as their individual encounters with the system at different times of need (the micro context), that iteratively constitute the construction of the emotional terrain. The conclusions drawn could have wider implications for the development of emotional understanding, across organisations that are subject to similar changes.

Details

Individual and Organizational Perspectives on Emotion Management and Display
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-411-9

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 24 January 2020

Pradeep Kumar

This study aims to identify the dimensions of patient recovery flexibility in the public healthcare context and its impact on the service experience. The study also…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to identify the dimensions of patient recovery flexibility in the public healthcare context and its impact on the service experience. The study also explores the strategies and contextual influences to attain patient recovery flexibility.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper uses a case study method based on a semi-structured interview with healthcare professionals, observations and informal discussions.

Findings

In the present study, several dimensions of patient recovery flexibility are reported. Different internal and external strategies to exhibit patient recovery flexibility, as well as two contextual influences, are identified. An integrative framework is developed to establish the relationship of patient recovery flexibility with service experience in public healthcare.

Research limitations/implications

The study was conducted in a public healthcare setting in India. The sample size for the semi-structured interview was limited to healthcare professionals, and the patient’s perspective is missing.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the growing need for patient recovery flexibility as a strategy in the public healthcare delivery system. It offers new insights to address the gap in the literature regarding the linkage of patient recovery flexibility and service experience. The study provides an integrative framework of dimensions of patient recovery flexibility, strategies, contextual influences and the impact on the service experience. The framework and propositions presented in the study will guide future research that is needed in this area. This study provides an overview to shape and redesign the after-service support from a flexibility perspective in public healthcare for the improved service experience.

Details

Journal of Asia Business Studies, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1558-7894

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 9 October 2020

Vikas Swarnakar, A.R. Singh and Anil Kr Tiwari

The purpose of this study is to develop a structured hierarchical interrelationship-based model to evaluate the critical failure factors (CFFs) that affect the sustainable…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to develop a structured hierarchical interrelationship-based model to evaluate the critical failure factors (CFFs) that affect the sustainable Lean Six Sigma (SLSS) framework implementation in a healthcare organization. Further, solution approaches have been provided that guide to eliminate them.

Design/methodology/approach

The CFFs has been identified through empirical study and clustered into six major categories for their better understanding. The interrelation among CFFs has been developed through total interpretive structural modeling (TISM) and classifies the nature using MICMAC technique. Further, prioritized the CFFs based on its driving and dependents power. The methodology enabled the decision-makers, practitioners to systematically analyze the CFFs and develop a structural model for implementing SLSS in the healthcare environment.

Findings

A total of 14 leading CFFs have been identified, and 7-level structured interrelationship-based model has been formed. The experts have provided the solution approach after careful analysis of the developed model. Based on the analysis, it was observed that the significant CFFs affect the deployment of the SLSS framework in healthcare organizations.

Research limitations/implications

The structured model and methodological approach have been tested in a healthcare organization. In the future, the approach can be applied in the different service sectors.

Practical implications

The present study has been conducted in a real-time industrial problem. The practitioners, decision-makers and academicians expressed the usefulness of methodology for understanding the CFFs interrelation and their effect on SLSS implementation. This study also guides decision-makers to systematically tackle related problems.

Originality/value

The development of a structured CFFs based model for SLSS framework implementation using the integrated TISM-MICMAC with a detailed solution approach is a unique effort in a healthcare environment.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 38 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 3 May 2021

Marc Dorval and Marie-Hélène Jobin

This work seeks to offer a greater understanding of Lean healthcare implementation challenges conceptually taking a situated cultural organizational change perspective.

Abstract

Purpose

This work seeks to offer a greater understanding of Lean healthcare implementation challenges conceptually taking a situated cultural organizational change perspective.

Design/methodology/approach

A descriptive model of healthcare organizations’ Lean adoption trajectories is built using ripple and bridging modelization strategies from elements of three classic organizational change theories and knowledge from Lean, organizational culture, healthcare and operations management literature.

Findings

The “contingent Lean culture adoption” (CLCA) model suggests five theoretical trajectories the healthcare organizations may experience when conducting a Lean transformation. These trajectories evolve from a new concept of Lean cultural friction (LCF) which represents cultural friction that a healthcare organization encounters toward an ultimate Lean culture proficiency state through time. From high to low initial LCF, a healthcare organization may in its Lean proficiency course end up in three states: lower, similar or higher LCF situation.

Research limitations/implications

The CLCA model demonstrates the potential to be developed into a framework and possibly a Lean cultural friction theory pending further qualitative and quantitative validation.

Practical implications

The CLCA model may help healthcare managers to use more appropriate cultural change strategies during their organization’s Lean journey.

Originality/value

This work enriches the concept of Lean cultural change which may apply not only to healthcare organizations but also to other ones. It suggests the existence of a healthcare organization Lean culture proficiency archetype and introduces the notion of Lean cultural friction.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 19 July 2005

Beaufort B. Longest

The incentives for organizations to practice good corporate citizenship include social expectations and pressures, the ingrained values of corporate leaders, and…

Abstract

The incentives for organizations to practice good corporate citizenship include social expectations and pressures, the ingrained values of corporate leaders, and citizenship's contributions to business performance. In addition, healthcare organizations have a unique citizenship incentive because of the relationship between practicing corporate citizenship and achieving the core, health-enhancing purposes of these organizations. A template of six organization behaviors that have been empirically determined to be widely used citizenship-related behaviors is described, along with how a large healthcare organization exhibits these behaviors. A three-step process is described through which healthcare organizations can build competence in corporate citizenship by (1) incorporating citizenship commitments into their missions and giving citizenship a high priority; (2) organizing to build competence in corporate citizenship, and to facilitate and sustain citizenship performance; and (3) maintaining commitment to citizenship competence and increasing citizenship performance by conducting periodic citizenship audits, and acting on the results.

Details

Competence Perspectives on Resources, Stakeholders and Renewal
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-170-5

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 27 August 2014

Luca Gastaldi and Mariano Corso

Drawing on the experience of the Observatories, a set of interconnected research centers in Italy, this chapter explains why academics are in one of the best positions to…

Abstract

Drawing on the experience of the Observatories, a set of interconnected research centers in Italy, this chapter explains why academics are in one of the best positions to orchestrate interorganizational initiatives of change and development, and highlights two prerequisites that appear necessary to render salient this orchestrator role of academics: (i) the extensive use of multiple approaches of collaborative research and (ii) the creation and maintenance of a platform allowing the management and diffusion of the network-based learning mechanisms underlying each change and development effort. The contributions extend existing knowledge on organization development and collaborative research.

Details

Research in Organizational Change and Development
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-891-4

Content available
Article
Publication date: 22 December 2020

Jitse Jonne Schuurmans, Nienke van Pijkeren, Roland Bal and Iris Wallenburg

The purpose of this paper is to explore the formation and composition of “regions” as places of care, both empirically and conceptually.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the formation and composition of “regions” as places of care, both empirically and conceptually.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper draws on action-oriented research involving experiments aimed at designing, implementing and evaluating promising solutions to the entwined problems of a burgeoning elderly population and an increasing shortage of medical staff. It draws on ethnographic research conducted in 14 administrative areas in the Netherlands, a total of 273 in-depth interviews and over 1,000 h of observations.

Findings

This research challenges the understanding of a healthcare region as a clearly bounded topological area. It shows that organizations and professionals collaborate in a variety of different networks, some conterminous with the administrative region established by policymakers and others not. These networks are by nature unstable and dynamic. Attempts to form new regional collaborations with neighbouring organizations are complicated by existing healthcare governance and accountability structures that position organizations as competitors.

Practical implications

Policymakers should take the pre-established partnerships of healthcare organizations into account before delineating the area in which regionalization is meant to take place. A better alignment of governance and accountability structures is also needed for regionalization to occur in healthcare.

Originality/value

This paper combines insights from valuation studies with sociogeographical literature and provides a framework for understanding the assembling and disassembling of “regions”.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 35 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 9 August 2019

Vaishnavi V., Suresh M. and Pankaj Dutta

The purpose of this paper is to identify and analyze the interactions among different readiness factors for implementing agility in healthcare organization. Total…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify and analyze the interactions among different readiness factors for implementing agility in healthcare organization. Total interpretive structural modeling (TISM) based readiness framework for agility has been developed to understand the mutual interactions among the factors and to identify the driving and dependence power of these factors.

Design/methodology/approach

The identification of factors is done by TISM approach used for analyzing the mutual interactions between factors. Cross-impact matrix multiplication applied to classification analysis is utilized to find the driving and dependent factors of agile readiness in healthcare.

Findings

This paper identifies 12 factors of readiness for change in literature review, which is followed by an expert interview to understand the interconnection of factors and to study interrelationships of factors. The study suggests that factors like environmental scanning, resource availability, innovativeness, cost effectiveness, organizational leadership, training and development are important for implementing/improving the readiness of agility in healthcare organizations.

Research limitations/implications

This research focuses mainly on readiness factors for agility in healthcare sector.

Practical implications

Top management must stress on readiness factors that have a strong driving power for efficient implementation of agility in healthcare. This study helps the managers to take quick decisions, and continuous monitoring of readiness factors would be more beneficial to improve the quality of service, which makes the organization more agile.

Originality/value

In this research, TISM-based readiness for agile framework structural model has been proposed for healthcare organizations, which is a new effort for implementation of agility in healthcare.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 26 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 17 January 2019

Poonam Singh

The purpose of this paper is to provide insights toward the potential of lean healthcare organization for environment sustainability and develop propositions for future studies.

Downloads
1092

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide insights toward the potential of lean healthcare organization for environment sustainability and develop propositions for future studies.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a conceptual paper to study the inbuilt capacity of lean healthcare organization to mitigate environmental footprint. As a result, lean compatibility with environmental sustainability (ES) has been explored in areas like manufacturing, supply chain, aviation, construction, etc. The lean philosophy, lean culture and lean tools were analyzed to identify their contribution to ES in the context of healthcare organizations.

Findings

Based on the analysis of lean philosophy, culture and tool, this paper theorizes that lean healthcare organizations have huge potential to mitigate environmental footprints. Lean healthcare organizations need not to do any extra effort for ES albeit it is inbuilt in it. Lean philosophy provides a vision to the healthcare organization for ES whereas lean culture bestow healthcare with an epistemology for the same.

Research limitations/implications

This paper provides insight that ES is embedded in lean healthcare organizations. Lean healthcare organizational culture is ideal for application for constructivism theory where employees construct a new knowledge from their experiences to minimize the waste that eventually help in ES.

Originality/value

Major contributions of the study include a new approach for mitigating the environmental footprints by adopting lean in healthcare organization.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 26 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 25000