Search results

1 – 10 of over 5000

Abstract

Purpose of this chapter

A climate of austerity has gripped the politico-economic philosophy of many nation states across Europe and beyond as governments seek to rebalance budget deficits. This presents unique challenges for those engaged in purposeful acts aiming to regenerate communities of places – the regeneration managers.

Design/methodology/approach

England provides an interesting case study to examine some of the prime challenges facing regeneration managers by focusing on the ideologies that have informed successive UK governments’ policy responses and spatial strategies. The main body of research, including interviews, was carried out between 2010 and 2012, and was subsequently updated in early 2013.

Findings

Tracing an apparent transmutation of urban regeneration policy, the chapter helps to unmask a spatially unjust neoliberal toolkit, albeit pierced by some socially motivated actually existing regeneration initiatives. The transmutation of regeneration that has taken place is often concealed by de facto austerity measures and austerity politics.

Research limitations

The programme of interviews remains ongoing, as the research continues to track the shifting contours of state-led regeneration policy. Analysis is therefore provisional and explorative, with more detailed research reports and publications subject to follow.

Practical implications

The chapter explores emerging new agendas and sets out to identify some of the primary challenges that regeneration managers must face.

Social implications

Regeneration’ as a state-led policy objective and political concern has been virtually expunged from the Coalition lexicon. The present policy preference is to target public resources in ‘value-added’ schemes that favour private oriented objectives in a highly unbalanced way.

What is original/value of paper

The curtailment of broader regeneration debates has framed discussions limited to the depth of cuts, the speed of implementation and the spatial distribution of such measures. The result is that regeneration, understood as a capitalist policy instrument intended to respond to and assuage the outcomes produced by capitalist frameworks, is no more.

Details

Looking for Consensus?: Civil Society, Social Movements and Crises for Public Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-725-2

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 December 2019

Nicholas Wise

There are many ways of viewing, interpreting and even conceptualizing Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa (BRICS) growth. This paper considers image regeneration

Abstract

Purpose

There are many ways of viewing, interpreting and even conceptualizing Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa (BRICS) growth. This paper considers image regeneration and how this helps enhance place competitiveness. A focus on events and the spectacle they create also challenges to think about sustainable futures. This paper aims to supplement this focus on image regeneration and competitiveness, it is important to discuss and outline triple bottom line impacts as a framework to consider going forward.

Design/methodology/approach

Looking at the BRICS, the growing events, tourism and leisure industries transcend private and public business practices and can help align with more contemporary sustainable development practices and regeneration agendas. Such agendas can, in turn, help enhance destination competitiveness and image. While the authors need (and should) continue to assess and address economic impacts and development, it is just as important to consider environmental impacts and social impacts on a destination and its residents when considering competitiveness.

Findings

This conceptual paper frames insight from the literature to reflect on and consider research directions linked to triple bottom line impacts. The paper puts emphasis on the need to consider the social and environmental impacts of events.

Originality/value

This paper links conceptual discussions of image regeneration and competitiveness with triple bottom line impacts to look at directions for BRICS nations. It is useful for policymakers and planners who look at the “big picture” of event hosting and argues the need for more sustainable policy and planning agendas.

Details

Journal of Place Management and Development, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8335

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 2021

Anthony Webster, Olga Kuznetsova, Cilla Ross, Cécile Berranger, Michelle Booth, Temidayo Eseonu and Yaron Golan

This paper aims to provide an introduction to how worker co-operatives and other organisations based on principles of the participatory economy have been adopted in a…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide an introduction to how worker co-operatives and other organisations based on principles of the participatory economy have been adopted in a range of international contexts as a vehicle for transforming places with a strong aspiration to address location-specific social challenges.

Design/methodology/approach

Through a presentation of four narrative cases, the paper exemplifies international experiences of co-operative approaches to place-making. It critically reflects on the philosophical and strategic underpinnings of the projects implemented in Rochdale, Preston, Bologna, Rome and Cincinnati.

Findings

The practical experiences of a number of local projects of place-making involving co-operatives are conceptualised. The research has identified the importance of institutional, organisational and legal constraints for transformative cooperative-based place-making initiatives. It shows a strong relevance of the place’s historic legacy and communal governance for the choice of place-making approaches.

Research limitations/implications

Further investigation is needed to establish whether co-operatives have the same driving force potential in terms of local regeneration and community wealth building place-making in non-Western contexts and less developed locations.

Practical implications

The paper highlights cases that incorporate place-making practices involving the co-operative organisation and municipal participation and considers their transferability potential.

Originality/value

The paper advances an important conversation relevant to researchers, educators, co-operators, politicians and local officials on diverse contemporary approaches in towns and cities that seek to reshape and regenerate local socio-economic fabric by engaging tradition, principles and organisation models developed within the co-operative movement.

Details

Journal of Place Management and Development, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8335

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 February 2016

Romain Roult, Jean-Marc Adjizian and Denis Auger

Many Olympic cities are faced with the challenge of converting various remaining infrastructures after the Games have been held. These infrastructures, often imposing and…

Abstract

Purpose

Many Olympic cities are faced with the challenge of converting various remaining infrastructures after the Games have been held. These infrastructures, often imposing and highly specialized, require local actors to innovate and engage in an urban renewal process that can be very complex and expensive when trying to give them a second life as tourism sites. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on an online survey administered to international travellers (n=5,553) and 36 semi-structured interviews with local stakeholders, this study shows that the Olympic Park, mainly through the stadium, has international recognition.

Findings

However, the sustainability and development of these attractions will need a major overhaul with its welcoming amenities and the integration of the surrounding neighbourhoods in the regeneration plan.

Originality/value

Among these facilities, we have the Montreal Olympic Stadium, which is often identified as the architectural jewel of the games and is used as an urban flagship in tourism development strategies. This situation raises several questions not only in the field of tourism, but also the fields of urban studies, leisure and sociology. This paper will examine the case of the Olympic Park in Montreal and its urban regeneration concepts and place branding that have been integrated into the tourism strategies since the early 2000s.

Details

International Journal of Tourism Cities, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-5607

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 October 2004

Joseph T.L. Ooi

120

Abstract

Details

Journal of Property Investment & Finance, vol. 22 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-578X

Book part
Publication date: 4 December 2018

Chung-Shing Chan and Lawal M. Marafa

This chapter explores the concept of branding in a contemporary competitive arena of places. The multi-dimensional interpretations of places offer a variety of…

Abstract

This chapter explores the concept of branding in a contemporary competitive arena of places. The multi-dimensional interpretations of places offer a variety of possibilities to better understand the true essence of destination branding. One of the common interpretations of places is through the study of their images, as destination branding requires a thorough understanding of destination image. The important foundation and relation of destination image are specified and explained. The notion of destination branding has evolved from the fields of marketing and urban studies and has become a cross-disciplinary research area. Thus, the researchers explain that destination branding as well as ‘place branding’ are dynamic concepts that are being continuously being explored in academia for the benefit of practitioners in travel and tourism. This chapter suggests that the use of brand equity is also one of the frontier areas of study in ‘place branding’ as it emphasises the need to thematise destinations (e.g. for their historical heritage, cultural value, natural attractions, etc.) and places for residence (e.g. as green cities, creative cities, smart cities, etc.).

Details

The Branding of Tourist Destinations: Theoretical and Empirical Insights
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-373-9

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 29 March 2013

Ryan Woolrych and Judith Sixsmith

The concepts of well‐being and participation are prevalent in current regeneration policy, being seen as crucial to alleviating disadvantage and marginalisation in…

1469

Abstract

Purpose

The concepts of well‐being and participation are prevalent in current regeneration policy, being seen as crucial to alleviating disadvantage and marginalisation in deprived communities. However little is understood about how such ambiguous concepts are articulated within urban regeneration practice. This paper seeks to present a reflective case study of research in a New Deal for Communities (NDC) area designed to understand different conceptualisations of well‐being and participation in community places and regeneration practices.

Design/methodology/approach

The perspectives of regeneration professionals, local residents and academics were revealed through the development of a multi‐method and participatory research approach using interviews, observations, video diaries and workshops. An action oriented event aimed at developing overlapping communities of practice was held to engage in active dialogue and develop shared understandings between the resident, professional and academic communities.

Findings

Conceptualisations of well‐being and participation articulated through regeneration policy and practice between the different stakeholder groups are contradictory. The absence of a shared vision for regeneration and differing expectations of participation can have detrimental effects on both the well‐being of local residents and the sustainability of the long‐term participation of local residents in the regeneration process. This challenges the recent government approach to creating a Big Society which is underpinned by devolved decision making and the desire for local leadership through realising the potential of communities.

Originality/value

The research has helped to create new relationships between residents and professionals organised around joint working and changed practice.

Details

International Journal of Public Sector Management, vol. 26 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3558

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 2004

Graham Hankinson

Assesses the relative saliency of image attributes associated with history, heritage and culture in shaping the perceptions of places as tourism destinations. Such images…

14149

Abstract

Assesses the relative saliency of image attributes associated with history, heritage and culture in shaping the perceptions of places as tourism destinations. Such images tend to have been formed over a long period of time and result from exposure to communication processes largely outside marketing's core sphere of influence such as education, literature and the arts. Images formed in this way are referred to in this paper as organic images. The research used the repertory grid technique developed by George A. Kelly in the context of Personal Construct Theory combined with depth interviews to elicit the attributes associated with the images of 25 destinations in the UK. The study identified 11 categories of image attribute. Those associated with a destination's history, heritage and culture were found to be the second most salient category. The implications of these findings are discussed.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 October 2021

Marco Reggiani

This paper aims to shed light on current initiatives of urban regeneration around the Shibuya Station area within the context of contemporary Tokyo’s place development…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to shed light on current initiatives of urban regeneration around the Shibuya Station area within the context of contemporary Tokyo’s place development strategies. The objectives are twofold: to illustrate the characteristics of the plans and the planning approaches framing the interventions; and to identify the strategies employed to reshape the cityscape.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a case study approach, this paper combines data from historical and archival research, as well as policy documents and plans. These are supplemented by data from extensive fieldwork undertaken between 2015 and 2019 to critically assess and interpret the implemented policies and the outcomes of the regeneration.

Findings

The paper provides insight into the ongoing urban regeneration around the Shibuya Station area and identifies five key themes that summarise the strategies employed to transform the urban landscape in the area. Despite the apparent success and some innovations introduced by the redevelopment project, critical issues remain–especially around the privatisation of public space and the lack of a holistic approach to sustainability.

Originality/value

The paper examines a significant and timely case of urban regeneration. By critically discussing the implications of the redevelopment around Shibuya Station in the context of Tokyo’s current place development strategies, the study highlights the importance of an inclusive notion of sustainable development and contributes to the debate around Japanese urbanism and urban regeneration.

Details

Journal of Place Management and Development, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8335

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 30 December 2013

Simon Pemberton

The chapter summarises issues associated with the effectiveness of urban policy interventions. In particular it emphasises the importance of sites, scales and spaces of…

Abstract

Purpose

The chapter summarises issues associated with the effectiveness of urban policy interventions. In particular it emphasises the importance of sites, scales and spaces of state activity and the implications for the current and future nature of regeneration governance, policy and practice.

Methodology/approach

The chapter draws upon strategic-relational state theory.

Findings

With reference to the United Kingdom (UK), there are significant changes taking place that are affecting the site, scale and nature of urban regeneration. However, there is considerable uncertainty over the extent to which discrepancies in performance between areas will be addressed.

Research implications

Further research will be required on the consequences for regeneration of the rescaling of state power, the changing institutions of the state and the emergence of new political forces and strategies.

Originality/value of the chapter

The chapter provides a theoretical and empirical framework to understand both the current and future nature of urban regeneration governance in the UK and beyond.

Details

Looking for Consensus?: Civil Society, Social Movements and Crises for Public Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-725-2

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 5000