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Article
Publication date: 7 September 2021

Sabrina Spangsdorf and Alex Forsythe

This paper aims to introduce an identity fit perspective adding to the understanding of the Nordic gender equality paradox of top managing positions using a Danish sample as case.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to introduce an identity fit perspective adding to the understanding of the Nordic gender equality paradox of top managing positions using a Danish sample as case.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, five hypotheses concerning identity perception of top managing positions and the relationship with own identity and type of industry were tested through a correlational research design utilizing a cross-sectional survey methodology. A total of 1,054 women aged 18–60 participated in the survey.

Findings

The analysis revealed a strong masculine perception of a top managing position whereas women's own identity perception was much more diverse. The more masculine a woman perceives herself to be, the more motivated she is to climb the career ladder. Type of industry moderates the relationship between identity fit and motivation for top positions, but only for the masculine traits. The relationship between identity fit and motivation is stronger for women in high masculine industries.

Originality/value

Apart from being the first study of identity fit in a Nordic setting, this study contributes to the identity fit theory by employing a semi-objective fit approach exploring identity fit on an industry level, including female-dominated industries, as well as examining identity fit in relation to motivation to pursue a top managing position.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 26 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 29 March 2022

Letwin Tawira and Alex Ivanov

Virtual try-on apps (VTOs) hold great potential to transform online apparel shopping, yet their acceptance by consumers has been lukewarm. By drawing on two theories – Sirgy’s…

2161

Abstract

Purpose

Virtual try-on apps (VTOs) hold great potential to transform online apparel shopping, yet their acceptance by consumers has been lukewarm. By drawing on two theories – Sirgy’s theory of the self and Sundar’s theory of interactive media effects (TIME) – the study tests a PLS model with two new constructs: Photo Satisfaction and Consumer Inspiration, and their impact on Adoption Intention.

Design/methodology/approach

This mixed methods study examines the effects from personalization and customization affordances in the latest generation of apparel VTOs. The proposed model was tested in a quasi-experimental within-subjects design, as 61 female participants completed a goal-directed and an exploratory apparel shopping task using two VTO apps available on the market.

Findings

Inspiration induced from the customization affordance in the exploratory task influenced Adoption Intention as strongly as Fit Confidence did. For both conditions, users’ satisfaction with their avatar picture had a stronger effect on Perceived Augmentation than the individual trait of Body Esteem. The study also demonstrates how TIME’s Sense of Agency component could help theorize positive consumer responses to mobile marketing technology, which in our study were induced via the app’s Mix and Match feature. Also demonstrated was that Perceived Augmentation could be influenced by body-image affective judgments made during the pre-task VTO avatar creation phase.

Practical implications

VTO’s customization feature “Mix and Match” appears vital for the adoption of such apps for exploratory m-shopping of apparel. Also important is the satisfaction with one's photograph during the avatar-creation phase. We further suggest that apparel retailers work with Augmented Reality developers to include dynamic avatar capability as well as social sharing affordances in VTOs.

Social implications

60 billion USD worth of returns occur annually in the online apparel retail industry, mostly related to fitting problems, not to mention the larger carbon footprint from the increased transportation. A more wide-spread adoption of VTOs can not only help with these problems but also lighten the traffic in brick and mortar fitting rooms, a potential hazard at this time of pandemic.

Originality/value

This is the first study to examine Consumer Inspiration in the context of online apparel retailing and to demonstrate the importance of Photo Satisfaction during the avatar-creation phase in influencing the subsequent user experience in apparel VTOs.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 35 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 September 2013

Yoann Bazin and Clémence Aubert-Tarby

The purpose of this paper is to explore the phenomenon of dress codes in professions. Since they can be considered as carriers of both organizational communication and individual…

2417

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the phenomenon of dress codes in professions. Since they can be considered as carriers of both organizational communication and individual identity, they will be central in professions as communities and through the professionalization process. Therefore, we will ask the following question: what is the role of understanding and complying with dress codes in becoming a professional?

Design/methodology/approach

The empirical study consists in a series of ethnographic interviews and observations aiming at understanding dress codes' roles and dynamics in financial professions.

Findings

Exploring dress codes in three typical professions in finance, we have discovered that they also are mediums of communication within the group, strengthening a certain aesthetic sense of belonging and of presenting the self.

Originality/value

In this, becoming a professional can be understood as an aesthetic experience through which all senses are involved. Considering professions as being also aesthetic communities shifts the focus – or rather enlarges it – toward symbolic, corporeal and sensorial elements.

Details

Society and Business Review, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5680

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 December 2022

Alex Ivanov, Milena Head and Cosima Biela

Virtual try-on apps (VTOs) allow consumers to examine fashion and furniture items in usage context without going to a physical store. But the adoption of such apps has varied…

1282

Abstract

Purpose

Virtual try-on apps (VTOs) allow consumers to examine fashion and furniture items in usage context without going to a physical store. But the adoption of such apps has varied across product categories, and research on user acceptance of AR marketing has been fragmented. The current study aims to develop and test a general model that explains the formation of decision comfort (DC) in the majority of AR try-on experiences for mobile shopping.

Design/methodology/approach

After reviewing 30 VTOs available on the iOS app store, the authors chose the Wanna Kicks sneaker shopping VTO as the most representative to test their hypotheses for AR try-on in general. Overall, 178 online consumers performed a sneaker shopping task on their mobile devices, and their responses were analyzed with the partial least squares method.

Findings

The study confirmed the key role of perceived augmentation in leading to DC via a utilitarian and a hedonic path. These effects were attenuated for younger users, and haptic imagery only had a utilitarian impact. Scholars should pay more attention to the variable of age, while managers should act quickly to enhance the basic AR affordances of mobile try-on apps.

Originality/value

This is the first study of a VTO in the footwear category and with a model that tests age as a moderating variable between antecedents and consumer responses.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 35 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 October 2018

Bronwyn Eager, Sharon L. Grant and Alex Maritz

The purpose of this paper is to explore whether descriptions of functional coping strategies among entrepreneurs vary along temporal dimensions, from reactive or present oriented…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore whether descriptions of functional coping strategies among entrepreneurs vary along temporal dimensions, from reactive or present oriented, to anticipatory or future oriented. Future-oriented coping is largely unexplored in stress and coping studies in the entrepreneurship literature, despite evidence that a future time perspective is advantageous for entrepreneurs.

Design/methodology/approach

This study adopts an exploratory, qualitative approach: interviews were conducted with 22 entrepreneurs and coping strategies were classified, via thematic analysis, according to function, then time orientation.

Findings

Results confirmed that entrepreneurs’ coping strategies can be classified according to conventional functional taxonomies of coping that emphasize form (affective, behavioral, cognitive) and direction (change, adapt, disengage), but additionally suggested that time orientation may be an important dimension for classifying coping strategies in the entrepreneurship context.

Practical implications

The findings inform the assessment of coping strategies in future research on stress, coping and strain among entrepreneurs. In particular, researchers should assess temporal dimensions of coping alongside the functional dimensions which have been emphasized in past research. Assessment of meaningful dimensions of coping is necessary to identify adaptive and maladaptive coping strategies in future research. Knowledge of adaptive coping strategies among entrepreneurs can inform coping skills interventions for stress resilience.

Originality/value

This study makes a unique contribution to the emergent body of literature on stress and coping among entrepreneurs by utilizing both functional and temporal coping taxonomies to identify relevant dimensions of coping for study in this context.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 26 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 17 February 2022

Jessica Strübel and Monica Sklar

In 1930s Britain, tennis champion Fred Perry was a household name. However, the name Fred Perry is more commonly associated with striped-collar polo shirts featuring a laurel…

Abstract

In 1930s Britain, tennis champion Fred Perry was a household name. However, the name Fred Perry is more commonly associated with striped-collar polo shirts featuring a laurel wreath logo. In the late 1960s, Fred Perry polo shirts were standard mod and Skinhead dress. When worn by working-class youth the shirt became subversive commentary on English elitism because it had originally been designed for the tennis courts. Many punks also aligned with the brand in dual demonstration of association with working-class ethics as well as an alternative to t-shirts. In the 1980s and onward, this sartorial style was appropriated by right-wing white nationalists, which stripped it of its subcultural spirit. Patriot groups, such as neo-Nazis and the alt-right have continued to co-opt the subcultural style, simultaneously turning the Fred Perry polo into a symbol of racism and bigotry. The multi-use of the Fred Perry brand creates a challenge in how to interpret visual cues when one garment has competing perceptions that at times can be completely opposing. This study examines the history of the Fred Perry brand through the lens of symbolic interactionism, specifically how the shirt evolved from a rather innocuous, yet subversive, form of merchandize repurposed from the tennis world to youth subcultures where the polo communicated group identity. As the brand has moved through fashion cycles, the association of the Fred Perry polo with deviant groups has reduced the brand to representations of hate and separation, which has impacted sales and brand image with its intended consumers.

Details

Subcultures
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80262-663-6

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 June 2008

Alex Bennet and David Bennet

The purpose of this paper is to explore the role of emotion in learning, specifically, e‐learning and its relationship to the phenomenon called energetic learning.

2829

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the role of emotion in learning, specifically, e‐learning and its relationship to the phenomenon called energetic learning.

Design/methodology/approach

After first presenting operation definitions, the paper looks through the lens of new findings in neuroscience to build an understanding of the role of emotions in learning, then focuses specifically on how e‐learning systems contribute to energetic learning, providing examples of e‐learning platforms and software programs currently available that have specific attributes contributing to energetic learning.

Findings

With technology comes a natural excitement in terms of connectivity and its support of self‐driven, experiential learning which is part of the evolutionary heritage. As the understanding of the neuroscience and biology of human learning advances, the personal needs of individual learners are being begun to understand better. Bringing these needs together with e‐learning system capabilities will offer a significant jump in the learning rate and efficiency as we move into a future filled with change, uncertainty, complexity and anxiety.

Originality/value

The paper introduces the concept of energetic learning with specific focus on the contribution of e‐learning to energetic learning.

Details

VINE, vol. 38 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0305-5728

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 March 2008

Ernest Nickels

The purpose of this article is to examine whether officer uniform color influences impressions the public forms about the character of police officers.

3703

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to examine whether officer uniform color influences impressions the public forms about the character of police officers.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey using digitally manipulated photographic prompts was used to examine how various levels of officer race, posture, and uniform color as well as a number of other experiential, attitudinal and demographic variables influenced subjects' impressions of officers' character on factor scores constructed from a set of semantic differential scales.

Findings

Officer uniform color influences impression formation, but not in the expected manner. Black uniforms elicited more positive impressions of officers than did lighter uniforms.

Research limitations/implications

Convenience sample was drawn from university undergraduates.

Practical implications

Darker uniforms for police may enhance favorable character impressions formed by some sectors of the public.

Originality/value

The research instrument improves measurement validity over prior methods while maintaining a precise experimental control. Findings contradict the conclusions of prior research on public perceptions of darker vs lighter police uniforms.

Details

Policing: An International Journal of Police Strategies & Management, vol. 31 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-951X

Keywords

Case study
Publication date: 20 January 2017

Mark Jeffery, Robert J. Sweeney and Robert J. Davis

This case is based on a real-life consulting engagement with a major Fortune 100 telecommunications company. The name of the firm has been disguised for confidentiality reasons…

Abstract

This case is based on a real-life consulting engagement with a major Fortune 100 telecommunications company. The name of the firm has been disguised for confidentiality reasons. Completing the case teaches students how to develop a cost-containment ROI analysis and develop a business case for a large enterprise technology project. The class discussion focuses on strategies to understand and manage the risks of the project and organizational issues. In addition, the case teaches students good questions to ask when reviewing a complex project business case, and how to present a project for funding approval. This case is the second in a series of three cases designed to teach students ROI analysis for technology projects; the first is “B&K Distributors: Calculating Return on Investment for a Web-Based Customer Portal” and the third is the case “ROI for a Customer Relationship Management Initiative at GST.”

The case objective is for students to learn how to compute a return on investment (ROI) analysis for a large cost-containment technology project. Students learn the best practice of computing the range of possible outcomes (the best, worst, and expected case), and how to present the results to senior management. In addition, students learn how to incorporate important management issues of personnel reduction and technology project risk into an ROI analysis.

Details

Kellogg School of Management Cases, vol. no.
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2474-6568
Published by: Kellogg School of Management

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 August 2015

Carmen Galve-Górriz and Alejandro Hernández-Trasobares

– This paper aims to clarify the relationship between institutional framework, concentration of ownership in family firms and results.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to clarify the relationship between institutional framework, concentration of ownership in family firms and results.

Design/methodology/approach

Data comprises two samples of family firms from eight Latin American countries and Spain in the year 2010. The first sample contains the largest 20 corporations from each country. The second comprises the 20 largest listed family corporations in each country. To test the hypothesis, the study uses ordinary least squares.

Findings

First, firms located in countries with a higher than average quality of the institutional and regulatory frameworks are less concentrated in ownership than firms located in countries with lower than average quality and development of institutional and regulatory framework. Second, the influence of the concentration of the ownership in the performance is more important in countries with higher developed institutional and regulatory frameworks. Finally, first-generation large family firms obtain higher results than large family firms in second generation or beyond.

Research limitations/implications

The study is limited to one year and there are few family firms in Latin American countries. The study only considers some features of ownership, and there is no information about board of directors ' composition.

Practical implications

Institutional framework determines concentration of ownership in family firms and the influence of concentration of ownership in performance.

Originality/value

The study provides new evidence in areas of corporate governance and family firms, analysing a sample of Latin American and Spanish firms, representatives of the civil legal system and a weaker institutional framework. The study uses the corruption perception index like a control variable.

Details

Corporate Governance, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-0701

Keywords

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