Index

Reimagining Historically Black Colleges and Universities

ISBN: 978-1-80043-665-7, eISBN: 978-1-80043-664-0

Publication date: 26 May 2021

This content is currently only available as a PDF

Citation

(2021), "Index", Crosby, G.B., White, K.A., Chanay, M.A. and Hilton, A.A. (Ed.) Reimagining Historically Black Colleges and Universities (Great Debates in Higher Education), Emerald Publishing Limited, Bingley, pp. 197-201. https://doi.org/10.1108/978-1-80043-664-020211018

Publisher

:

Emerald Publishing Limited

Copyright © 2021 by Emerald Publishing Limited


INDEX

Abstract liberalism
, 22

Academic pipeline programs
, 56–60

Accountability groups
, 142

Affordability
, 129–133

African American community
, 1, 8

African spirituality
, 139–140

AfriWomanism
, 139–140

Agricultural College Act of 1890
, 94–95

Alabama A&M University
, 2

Alabama State University
, 7

Alumni Associations
, 72–73

Alumni relations
, 72–73

American College Personnel Association (ACPA)
, 48–49

American Missionary Society
, 7

American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE)
, 93

America’s democracy
, 136–137

Annual Fund
, 74

Annual Giving
, 74

Anti-structuralism
, 19

Behavioral dimension
, 46

Benedict College
, 8

Bipolar masculinity
, 113

Black excellence
, 46

Black feminism
, 115–116, 139–140

#BlackInTheIvory
, 21

Black Lives Matter movement
, 30–31, 92

Black Power Movement
, 48

Black womanhood
, 112–113

Borderlands concept
, 151–152

Brown v. Board of Education
, 137–138

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)
, 174

Cheyney University
, 7

Civil Rights Act of 1964
, 11, 90–91

Civil Rights Movement
, 30, 44, 46, 111

Civil War
, 98

Classroom community
, 140–143

Coercive power
, 164

Collaborative for Excellence in Educational Quality Assurance (CEEQA)
, 65

Color-blind racism
, 18

abstract liberalism
, 22

cultural racism
, 22–23

minimization
, 23

naturalization
, 22

Combahee River Collective
, 113–116

Common School Movement
, 138

Community benefit
, 94–95

Compositional diversity
, 45

Congress of Racial Equality (CORE)
, 46

Consequences of desegregation
, 81–82

Constituent giving
, 73–75

COVID-19
, 2, 33, 37, 75, 90, 133, 173

Creating Higher Expectations for Educational Readiness (CHEER)
, 58

Critical discourse analysis (CDA)
, 24

Critical race theory (CRT)
, 21–22

Critics
, 72

Crowdfunding
, 74–75

Culturally relevant leadership learning (CRLL) model
, 43–44

behavioral dimension
, 46

compositional diversity
, 45

inclusion/exclusion
, 44–45

organizational/structural aspects
, 46–47

psychological climate
, 45–46

Cultural racism
, 22–23

Democracy Matters
, 139

Discriminatory practices
, 10

Diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI)
, 61

Divine Nine
, 44–45

Donor relations
, 75–76

Eurocentric curriculum
, 6

Expert power
, 165–166

Financial health
, 35–36

Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University (FAMU)
, 58

Fostering Undergraduate Talent by Unlocking Resources for Education (FUTURE) Act
, 36

Free will
, 19

Fundraising
, 75, 84–85

Gallup-Purdue University
, 24

Government appropriations
, 82–83

Great Recession
, 35, 122–123

Harvard University
, 90

financial aid program
, 90

philanthropy
, 37

Higher Education Act
, 138

Historically Black colleges and universities (HBCUs)
, 1–2, 6, 11–12, 30, 53–54, 72, 79–81, 90–91, 98–99, 151, 157

academic pipeline programs
, 56–60

access
, 129

affordability
, 129–133

alumni
, 54

annual student loan debt
, 132

average acceptance
, 128

average student proportions
, 130

average total and net price
, 131

Benedict College expansion
, 8

black womanhood
, 112–113

collegiate
, 58–59

Combahee River Collective
, 113–116

consequences of desegregation
, 81–82

cultural and resource exchanges
, 93–94

culturally relevant leadership learning (CRLL) model
, 43–47

curriculums
, 6

democracy
, 137–139

enrollment
, 122–123

equity ratios
, 126

faculty
, 60

federal and state funding
, 36

financial health
, 35–36

full time equivalent (FTE)
, 81–82, 127

fundraising
, 84–85

government appropriations
, 82–83

government partnerships
, 94–95

graduate
, 59–60

identity politics
, 111–112

institutional resources
, 123–125

leadership
, 3, 8, 32–33, 43

LGBTQ + community
, 113

literacy
, 7–8

literature review
, 99

market demand
, 126–128

methodology
, 102–105

missionary paternalism
, 10

organizational adaptation
, 100

organizational change
, 100

organizational culture
, 100

organizational leadership
, 101

organizational strategy
, 101–102

organizational structure
, 101

personal power
, 169–171

philanthropy
, 37

precollegiate
, 57–58

quare theory framework (QTF)
, 154–155

racist ideologies
, 24–25

reading and writing activities
, 143–144

reallocate resources
, 83

revenue
, 91–93

self-segregate
, 22

social justice
, 43

social power
, 163–168

state legislatures
, 10

storytelling
, 34–35

structural adjustments
, 6

student movements
, 30–32

systemic racism
, 16

theoretical frameworks
, 155–156

theories of inequality
, 16–17

THRIVE Index tool
, 61, 65

traditional heterogendered institutions (THI)
, 153–154

training models
, 55–56

transformational tapestry model (TTM)
, 152–153

Transformation Inclusion
, 156–157

tuition and on-campus costs
, 80

type and control
, 122

United Negro College Fund
, 24

yield rates
, 128

Historically white institutions (HWIs)
, 30–31, 44, 47–48

Homophobia
, 113

Howard University
, 5–7, 111

minority-serving institutions (MSIs)
, 46–47

Toward a Black University (TABU)
, 6

Individualism
, 19

Informational power
, 163

Institutional Advancement
, 73–74

Institutional resources
, 123–125

Internal revenue service (IRS)
, 73

International Leadership Association (ILA)
, 48–49

Intersectionality
, 139–140

Justice, equity, diversity, and inclusion (JEDI)
, 53–54

Knowledge is Power Program (KIPP)
, 57–58

Laissez-faire racism
, 18–19, 23

Land Grant College Act
, 98

Leadership
, 32–33, 43, 103

Legitimate power
, 165

LeMoyne-Owen College
, 7

Lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT)
, 151

LGBTQ + community
, 113

Lincoln University
, 7, 46–47

Market demand
, 126–128

Massachusetts Constitution
, 138

Minimization
, 23

Minority Biomedical Research Support-Research Initiative for Scientific Enhancement (MBRS-RISE). Program
, 58

Minority-serving institutions (MSIs)
, 42, 46–47

Missionary paternalism
, 10

Mississippi Valley State University
, 34

Morehouse College
, 58, 91, 113

Morgan State College
, 11

Morgan State University
, 2

National Association of Student Personnel Administrators (NASPA)
, 48–49

National Center for Faculty Development and Diversity (NCFDD)
, 60

National Center for Science and Engineering Statistics (NCSES)
, 94

National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA)
, 91–92

National Football League (NFL)
, 91–92

National Pan Hellenic Council (NPHC)
, 44–45

National Science Foundation (NSF)
, 58–59

Naturalization
, 22

North Carolina A&T University
, 2

Organizational adaptation
, 100

Organizational change
, 100

Organizational culture
, 100

Organizational dimension
, 46–47

Organizational leadership
, 101

Organizational strategy
, 101–102

Organizational structure
, 101

Paradoxical ebullience
, 17

Personal power
, 162, 166, 168

be consistent
, 169–170

be fair
, 169

be firm
, 169

training
, 170–171

Philanthropy
, 37, 72

Portfolio Project
, 57–58

Post-Blackness
, 19–20

Post-racialism
, 19

Postsecondary education
, 79

Predominantly white institutions (PWIs)
, 15–16, 72, 90, 115, 174

color blindness
, 18

minimization
, 23

post-racialism
, 19

Prophetic justice
, 139

Psychological climate
, 45–46

Quality Education for Minorities (QEM)
, 58–59

Quality enhancement plan (QEP)
, 161–162

Quare theory framework (QTF)
, 154–155

Racial realism
, 21

Reallocate resources
, 83

Referent power
, 166

Reimagining
, 174–175

Relationalism
, 19

Rhetorical criticism
, 16, 24–25

Science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM)
, 57, 94

Second Morrill Act
, 10, 1890

Social justice
, 43–44

Social power

coercive
, 164

expert
, 165–166

informational
, 163

legitimate
, 165

personal
, 166–168

referent
, 166

reward
, 163–164

South Carolina State University
, 30

Southern Regional Educational Board’s (SREB’s) Doctoral Scholars Program (DSP)
, 59

Spelman College
, 7, 91

Stewardship
, 75–76

Storytelling
, 34–35

Student movements
, 30–32

Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC)
, 46

Sustainability
, 65–66

Texas Southern University
, 83

Theories of inequality
, 16–17

THRIVE Index tool
, 54–55, 65

cataloging
, 61–64

centering
, 64–65

composing
, 65

connections
, 64

diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI)
, 61

quality control (QC)
, 61, 63

query
, 61

Thurgood Marshall Fund (TMF)
, 58–59

Title III funding
, 36, 65–66

Toward a Black University (TABU)
, 5–6, 11

Traditional heterogendered institutions (THI)
, 153–154

Tragicomic hope
, 139

Transformational tapestry model (TTM)
, 152–153

Transformation Inclusion
, 156–157

United Negro College Fund (UNCF)
, 24, 57–58, 129

United States Department of Agriculture (USDA)
, 94–95

Verizon Innovative Learning (VIL) Minority Male (MM) Program
, 57

Voorhees College
, 6

Voting Rights Act of 1965
, 11

Wilberforce University
, 7

Womanism
, 139–140

Yale University
, 90

Prelims
Chapter 1 An Anchored Look Forward
Chapter 2 The History of HBCUs: Lessons on Innovation from the Past
Chapter 3 Don't Believe the Hype: HBCUs and MSIs Are Still Necessary to Black Political and Socioeconomic Development and Advancement
Chapter 4 HBCUs in a New Decade: A Look at 2010 to 2020 and Beyond
Chapter 5 HBCUs: The Foundation and Future of Social Justice, Leadership, and Leadership Development
Chapter 6 Using THRIVE as a Framework for Creating HBCU Success Stories
Chapter 7 Philanthropy versus Fundraising – An Imperative for HBCUs
Chapter 8 Financial Issues for HBCUs in 2020 and Beyond
Chapter 9 Sharpening a Competitive Edge: How HBCUs Leverage Their Strengths with Strategic Partnerships
Chapter 10 Adaptive Survival Strategies: A Case Study Analysis of Four Historically Black Colleges and Universities
Chapter 11 Answering the Call: The Role of HBCUs in Engaging Black Women's Identity Politics
Chapter 12 Current Trends, Future Directions: Promoting the Long-Term Survival and Success of HBCUs
Chapter 13 Democracy Matters in the 21st Century HBCU Writing Classroom: AfriWomanism as a Political, Pedagogical Tool
Chapter 14 The Category Is…Transformational Inclusion: A Conceptual Framework for (Re)imagining the Inclusion of Black Queer and Trans* Students Attending HBCUs
Chapter 15 The Usage of Personal Power When Collaborating with Black Male Scholars at a Historically Black College and University
Chapter 16 The Reasons for Reimagining
Epilogue
About the Editors
About the Contributors
Index