Case studies

Teaching cases offers students the opportunity to explore real world challenges in the classroom environment, allowing them to test their assumptions and decision-making skills before taking their knowledge into the workplace.

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Case study

Arpita Agnihotri and Saurabh Bhattacharya

Case can be taught at the undergraduate or postgraduate level, including executive Master of Business Administration programs.

Abstract

Study Level/Applicability

Case can be taught at the undergraduate or postgraduate level, including executive Master of Business Administration programs.

Subject Area

This case is intended for courses in strategic management, entrepreneurship and innovation at the undergraduate or postgraduate level.

Case Overview

The case is about challenges faced by Linda Portnoff, the Co-founder and Chief Executive Officer of Riteband, a Sweden-based fintech startup. In March 2020, Portnoff was conducting beta testing of Riteband’s app, which experts considered the world’s first stock exchange for music trading. After completing a PhD, Portnoff who was working as a Research Analyst, left her job to pursue entrepreneurship. Through Riteband, Portnoff helped to resolve pain points of artists who were forced to give the copyright of their music tracks or albums to distributors, in lieu of funds or promotional campaigns that distributors arranged for them. Portnoff invested in developing a patent-pending machine learning-based algorithm that based on several parameters could predict the likelihood of a music track or an album to become a success. Based on this prediction and royalty that artists were interested in sharing with fans, shares were issued to investors, who were also fans of the artists. As Portnoff identified an innovative business opportunity to trade music on a stock exchange based on Riteband’s machine learning algorithm, competition in Riteband’s strategic group was also becoming intense. Consequently, Portnoff was facing challenges of establishing competitive advantage of Riteband. Furthermore, as women in general faced challenges in raising funds for their startups, and even though Portnoff obtained some funding for Riteband, but overall, funding was a challenge for her as well. Moreover, as machine learning was a technical aspect for artists and potential investors, Portnoff also faced challenges to monetize on its machine learning algorithm.

Expected learning outcomes

By the end of the case study discussion, students should be able to: understand the principles of cross-industry innovation and explain the creation of new business opportunities based on cross-industry innovation; differentiate between direct and indirect competitors through strategic group analysis and further critically analyze the competitive advantage of business over other direct competitors; determine ways of reducing gender biases in venture capital funding; describe how machine learning works and further formulate ways to monetize a business through machine learning; and demonstrate the application of the value proposition canvas and business model canvas.

Subject codes

CCS 3: Entrepreneurship; CCS 11: Strategy.

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Case study

Michael Guglielmo, Shawn Edwards, Frank DiBernardino and Matthew Coughlin

This case was designed not only for MBA and executive education but also undergraduate courses in human resources (HR), leadership development, HR metrics and change…

Abstract

Study level/applicability

This case was designed not only for MBA and executive education but also undergraduate courses in human resources (HR), leadership development, HR metrics and change management. It is ideal for introducing the concepts of diversity, equity and inclusion (DE&I), the balanced scorecard and talent retention.

Subject area

The case deals with initiating and integrating DE&I programs into a company. It highlights how and when to start, change management issues during roll-out and convincing senior leadership why a program such as the one the protagonist started adds value to an organization.

Case Overview

In early 2018, Kate McKinnon, AVP of HR for CareerStaff Unlimited (CSU), a temporary staffing company and division of Genesis HealthCare, reflected on the late 2016 decision to develop women for leadership roles at the company. With a rather unconventional implementation of the Women’s Leadership Group (WLG), Kate successfully developed fifteen female individual contributors, many of whom were promoted to leadership roles by early 2018. Kate was concerned about maintaining the momentum necessary to continue (and expand) the program of identifying, developing, promoting, and retaining women and other diverse employees across the company. She also wanted to measure a clear correlation between the WLG and CSU’s financial and customer outcomes. It was time to plan phase two of the program, including further improvement of the DE&I efforts at CSU.

Expected learning outcomes

The learning outcome of this paper are as follows: focused programs, led by courageous and committed leaders, improve gender equity. DE&I is a business imperative, as much as a legal/risk challenge. To be understood, approved and communicated, HR Initiatives must add value and be aligned with the company strategy along with financial and customer outcomes. People development and growth contribute to top talent retention.

Supplementary materials

Teaching notes are available for educators only. Please contact your library to gain login details or email support@emeraldinsight.com to request teaching notes.

Social implications

Given the issues the USA is encountering after the George Floyd death and protests, this is a good way to demonstrate how courageous leadership can start to facilitate change in organizations.

Subject code

CCS 6: Human Resources.

Details

The Case For Women, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Case Study
ISSN:

Keywords

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Abstract

Study level/applicability

Graduate or Undergraduate Entrepreneurship Majors

Subject area

Entrepreneurship/Venture Capital Investing

Case overview

The case highlights a women-founded venture capital firm that values investments in diverse entrepreneurs and an innovative retail business started by two minority entrepreneurs. Students will be asked whether the firm should invest in the venture and will also be asked to discuss models that may help transform the retail business into a VC-backed scalable technology business.

Expected learning outcomes

By the end of the discussion, students will be able to: 1. Evaluate the feasibility and scalability of a new business venture 2. Evaluate the alignment between a venture capital company and a new venture.

Supplementary materials

Teaching notes are available for educators only.

Social implications

This case highlights the lack of resources for women and minority entrepreneurs as well as the underrepresentation of minority women in the Venture Capital industry.

Subject code

CCS 3: Entrepreneurship

Details

The Case For Women, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2732-4443

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Case study

Sathyanarayanan Ramachandran

The case could be effectively used in courses on entrepreneurship, strategy and brand management in MBA programs and executive-level training programs.

Abstract

Study level/applicability

The case could be effectively used in courses on entrepreneurship, strategy and brand management in MBA programs and executive-level training programs.

Subject area

Entrepreneurship, strategy, marketing, women leadership and women in business.

Case overview

This case deals with the business decision-making situation of Ms Jyotsna Ramachandran, a first-generation woman entrepreneur from Southern India, who has created a Global collaborative business network in self-publishing of books from India. After gaining industry experience for five years in some of the leading retail brands of India, she decided to take a plunge in entrepreneurship. She tried several businesses ranging from retail staffing to custom-made chocolates. Though it was profitable, the volumes and margins were smaller, and Jyotsna aspired big. As, at that time she was on her family way, she decided to identify a profitable business with better value creation and premium for the consumers and at the same time free from minute-by-minute concentration to take care of her child. In other words, a less-hassle home-based business with better revenue streams and margins. The case gives a thorough background of her rise in the industry and talks about some of her new ideas and plans.

Expected learning outcomes

Students will be in a position to: 1. Understand gender issues and bias affecting women in work. 2. Illustrate the initial phases of entrepreneurship. 3. Understand and apply the evaluation tools like PESTLE, SWOT and then business model canvas. 4. Understand the value chain and the intensive and integrative growth strategies. 5. Illustrate blue oceans in an industry setup – irrespective of the industry growth rate. 6. Apply perspectives on brand management.

Supplementary materials

Detailed teaching notes attached. Teaching notes are available for educators only.

Social implications

The case addresses the important gender issues affecting women’s work–life balance. It will also inspire many women through the success of the woman protagonist and her project head well documented in this case study.

Subject code

CCS 3: Entrepreneurship

Details

The Case For Women, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Case Study
ISSN:

Keywords

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Case study

Benoit Leleux, Charlotte Whitmore, Natalia Ligai and Theofanis Manolikas

The case provides a great illustration of women leadership in crisis times. A failed merger forced a deep review of the firm strategy and a realization that the legacy…

Abstract

Study level/applicability

The case provides a great illustration of women leadership in crisis times. A failed merger forced a deep review of the firm strategy and a realization that the legacy leadership arrangement was not optimal anymore. The hustand-and-wife team ended up swapping executive positions, with Charlotte resolutely taking on the CEO position.

Subject area

The case is designed as an integrative case looking simultaneously at key subjects such as leadership, entrepreneurship and management of a fast growing service firm, strategy as applied to IT consulting and finally gender studies, with the possibility to discuss the impact of gender roles.

Case overview

The case investigates Charlotte's efforts at building an original Search Engine Optimization firm in Seattle, progressively taking control from her husband to save the firm from bad strategic decisions.

Expected learning outcomes

The case is written to convey the emotional rollercoaster lived by Charlotte and key decisions she had to make as the leader of this fast growing data analytics firm. Learning outcomes focus on what is expected of a leader in such situation, in particular a female leader in a male-dominated technology environment.

Supplementary materials

Teaching Notes are available for educators only. Please contact your library to gain login details or email support@emeraldinsight.com to request teaching notes.

Social Implications

Consulting in general, and data analytics consulting in particular, are male-dominated worlds where a female leader faces many obstacles to realize their potential. Charlotte provides a masterful example of how to contribute to and lead a fast-growing firm and manage the family and the relationship to a partner who also happens to be the co-founder of the firm.

Subject code

CCS 3: Entrepreneurship

Details

The Case For Women, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Case Study
ISSN:

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Case study

Stefania Mariano

This case is appropriate for early-stage postgraduate courses in entrepreneurship or business modeling.

Abstract

Study level/applicability

This case is appropriate for early-stage postgraduate courses in entrepreneurship or business modeling.

Subject area

Entrepreneurship.

Case overview

Cosmobio case study presents the journey of Antonella Bognanni, founder and CEO of Cosmobio, along seven years of operations, from the initial assessment of the business opportunity to the launch, relaunch and closure of the business.

Expected learning outcomes

1. To establish whether or not a business idea is a business opportunity. 2. To articulate aspects related to management prowess and liability of newness. 3. To differentiate between a lean versus a more traditional approach to business planning. 4. To discuss the potential bias of preliminary research. 5. To apply definitions of first-mover advantage. 6. To discuss how to conduct an environmental analysis; identify industry and target markets; and perform a competitor analysis. 7. To compare low-cost strategies to differentiation strategies. 8. To discuss marketing mix and marketing strategy. 9. To illustrate challenges related to being a solopreneur and related leadership styles or gender issues implications. 10. To illustrate implications related to business failure, past mistakes and lessons learned.

Supplementary materials

Teaching notes are available for educators only.

Subject code

CCS 3 Entrepreneurship.

Details

The Case For Women, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Case Study
ISSN:

Keywords

Content available
Case study

Pai-Ling Yin and Benjamin Rostoker

MBA, advanced undergrad, entrepreneurship and technology commercialization classes.

Abstract

Study level/applicability

MBA, advanced undergrad, entrepreneurship and technology commercialization classes.

Subject area

Entrepreneurial diversity, equity and inclusion, medical device innovation, and models of business accelerators.

Case overview

The first half of the case explores Kathryne Cooper’s professional and personal journey and the ways her life experiences inform the goals she helps set for The West Coast Consortium for Technology & Innovation in Pediatrics (CTIP). As an African-American woman codirector of a medical device accelerator focused on the pediatric market, Cooper was acutely aware of the lack of diversity in the tech industry. The second half of the case explores the medical device market and the need for organizations such as CTIP. Cooper implemented a revised application process and system to encourage applications from underrepresented minority founders. CTIP was in a unique position to support concept stage products and nontraditional founders. The case concludes with a description of seven companies that have applied to join CTIP’s portfolio. Students are instructed to consider, as Cooper, which companies to support and what type of support to offer.

Expected learning outcomes

Explore the ways personal backgrounds inform leadership positions. Analyze how ventures are evaluated from a grant-funded accelerator (in contrast to an investment-fund accelerator). Examine the wide range of support that nontraditional founders require in the underserved pediatric market.

Supplementary materials

Teaching notes are available for educators only. Please contact your library to gain login details or email support@emeraldinsight.com to request teaching notes.

Social implications

A model to support diversity of gender and race in entrepreneurship.

Details

The Case For Women, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Case Study
ISSN:

Keywords

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Case study

Satyanandini Arjunan, Prathima Bhat and Ganesh R. Kumar

This case can be used in the core course on entrepreneurship for Bachelor of Business Administration (BBA) and Master of Business Administration/Post Graduate Diploma in…

Abstract

Study level/applicability

This case can be used in the core course on entrepreneurship for Bachelor of Business Administration (BBA) and Master of Business Administration/Post Graduate Diploma in Management (MBA/PGDM) students. It will help them to understand the motivations and challenges of women entrepreneurs, strategies to manage challenges, interactive style of leadership and their contribution to the economic growth of the country.

Subject area

Entrepreneurship.

Case overview

Roopa Rani, co-founded a digital design company, DesignTheme Innoventics (DTI), with her husband Yoganand, in November 2007, on the first floor of their residence. Yoganand’s creativity and Roopa’s determination made them bootstrap, scale slow and steady. As a novice to the industry, the initial days posed many challenges. Roopa hired artists to be appointed as designers, which gave them a unique selling preposition. They progressed slowly from a team of 2 to 20, with a revenue of INR 0.3M per annum to INR 12M per annum. As the company grew, Roopa wanted Yoganand’s support in handling the responsibilities, and hence, converted DTI into a limited liability partnership in 2013 and the couple were directors. As the client base improved, the need for shifting to a bigger space became more evident. A calculative risk-taker, Roopa, was forced to move DTI to a bigger office space end 2017, with a rent of INR60,000 per month. Meanwhile, they became a team of 20, with revenue of INR12m. The shift from no rent to a rented space made DTI slip to break-even. However, after two years, they moved into a smaller space and it coincided with the COVID-19 outbreak. Although the backlog orders were processed during the first quarter of 2020–2021, the business for the next quarter was affected. Social distancing norms created a shift in the way of doing business, which was a boon for a designing company like DTI. Now, the task before this self-made woman entrepreneur was to formulate strategies to scale up the business.

Expected learning outcomes

After analysing the case, the students will be able to: i. Value the contribution of women entrepreneurs towards the economy. ii. Examine the motivational factors and challenges of women entrepreneurs. iii. Understand the importance of networking. iv. Appraise the socio-cultural factors in a patriarchal society and their impact on the work-life balance of a woman entrepreneur. v. Appreciate the interactive leadership style of women entrepreneurs. vi. Formulate strategies to scale up the business.

Supplementary materials

• Agarwal, S., & Lenka, U. (2015). Study on work-life balance of women entrepreneurs – review and research agenda. Industrial and Commercial Training, 47(7), 356–362. doi:10.1108/ict-01–2015-0006 • Amit, R., & Muller, E. (1995). “Push” And “Pull” Entrepreneurship. Journal of Small Business & Entrepreneurship, 12(4), 64–80. doi:10.1080/08276331.1995.10600505 • Buttner, E. H. (2001). Examining Female Entrepreneurs' Management Style: An Application of a Relational Frame. Journal of Business Ethics, 29(3), 253–269. doi:10.1023/a:1026460615436 • Carter, S.C. (1997). E. Holly Buttner and Dorothy P. Moore (1997), ‘Women’s Organisational Exodus to Entrepreneurship: Self-reported Motivations and Correlates with Success', Journal of Small Business Management, January, pp34-47. • Cohoon, J. McGrath and Wadhwa, Vivek and Mitchell, Lesa, Are Successful Women Entrepreneurs Different from Men? (May 11, 2010). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract = 1604653 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.1604653 •Fletcher, J. (1998), Relational Practice: A Feminist Reconstruction of Work, Journal of Management Inquiry, 7(2), 163-186. • Kirkwood, J. (2009). Motivational factors in a push‐pull theory of entrepreneurship. Gender in Management: An International Journal, 24(5), 346–364. doi:10.1108/17542410910968805. • Malyadri, G., Dr. (2012). Role of women Entrepreneurs in the Economic Development of India. Paripex – Indian Journal of Research, 3(3), 104–105. doi: 10.15373/22501991/mar2014/36. Pal, N. (2016). Women Entrepreneurship in India: Important for Economic Growth. International Journal of Pure and Applied Researches, 4(1), 55–64. Pugazhendhi, D. P. (2019). Problems, Challenges and Development of Women Entrepreneurs. Emperor Journal of Economics and Social Science Research, 1(4), 48–53. doi:10.35338/ejessr.2019.1407. Shastri, S., Shastri, S., & Pareek, A. (2019). Motivations and challenges of women entrepreneurs. International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, 39(5/6), 338–355. doi:10.1108/ijssp-09–2018-0146. Tende, S.B. (2016). The Impact of Women Entrepreneurs towards National Development: Selected Study on Taraba State. Information and Knowledge Management, 6, 30–43. Xheneti, M., Karki, S. T., & Madden, A. (2018). Negotiating business and family demands within a patriarchal society – the case of women entrepreneurs in the Nepalese context. Entrepreneurship & Regional Development, 31(3–4), 259–278. doi:10.1080/08985626.2018.1551792

Subject code

CCS 3: Entrepreneurship.

Details

The Case For Women, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Case Study
ISSN:

Keywords

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Abstract

Study level/applicability

MS / MBA / Executive Education

Subject area

Leadership

Case overview

In 2019, French multinational electric utility company, ENGIE SA (ENGIE) was on the verge of zero carbon transition. Under the leadership of Isabelle Kocher (Kocher) who became the CEO in 2016, ENGIE embarked on an arduous journey toward re-profiling ENGIE toward renewable, low-carbon energies, such as solar, green gases and digital. Kocher inherited a loss-making company and took in on a path of transformation toward a company with business lines for future. This meant ENGIE would slowly move out of energy generation through non-renewable sources, toward renewables along with storage and digital technologies. This case chronicles Kocher’s turnaround plans and investments, and explains how she went about making ENGIE a forerunner in energy revolution. While the turnaround was on track, ENGIE was unable to give returns as expected. With mounting pressure Kocher announced a strategic plan in 2019, which reemphasized ENGIE’s focus on renewables and technology. But several major shareholders including the Government of France were not impressed with the plan. It is time Kocher proves that transformation of ENGIE into a clean power company also means returns for the shareholders.

Expected learning outcomes

The outcomes are as follows: First, to illustrate how leaders bring in change and innovation in large well-established companies. It shows the role of leaders in leading the innovation process and in molding the companies according to the opportunities and threats presented by the macro environment. Second, to analyze the role of a leader in bringing changes in the organization. Third, to understand the strategies used by energy companies as they position their businesses in the context of a changing energy landscape.

Supplementary materials

Teaching Note

Social implications

Renewable Energy – Growing cocnern about the impact of climate change on the world at large, has brought to the fore the importance of renewable energy.

Subject code

CCS 4: Environmental management

Details

The Case For Women, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Case Study
ISSN:

Keywords

Content available

Abstract

Study level/applicability

This case study can be used in graduate- and executive-level.

Subject Area

This case study can be used in entrepreneurship, leadership, crisis management, business succession, organizational behaviour and business expansion.

Case overview

In 2020, the EtonHouse International Education Group (EtonHouse) celebrated its 25th anniversary. Under the leadership of Ng Gim Choo, founder and managing director, EtonHouse has become a renowned education provider noted for its well-designed inquiry-based curriculum. Since its initial expansion in Singapore, the institution has spread across the world. Throughout its history, EtonHouse has faced many crises. However, employing paradoxical leadership, Ng Gim Choo has managed to accommodate conflicting demands and guide EtonHouse away from adversity. In early 2020, the coronavirus pandemic (COVID-19) posed an unprecedented challenge to EtonHouse. In addition to developing business strategies in response to COVID-19, Ng Gim Choo has been considering whether the time is ripe to hand over the reins to Ng Yi Xian, her son and EtonHouse successor.

Expected learning outcomes

By presenting the dilemma of business succession in crises, the case study facilitates in-depth discussion of several issues related to family business succession, succession planning and crisis management. Students will be able to explore the following issues: 1. The concept and implications of paradoxical leadership and its application in business decisions. 2. How to lead during crises. 3. The tension between succession plans and crisis management. 4. The characteristics and implications of woman entrepreneurship.

Details

The Case For Women, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Case Study
ISSN:

Keywords

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