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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1999

Paul B. Wiener and Special Services Librarian

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Electronic Resources Review, vol. 3 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1364-5137

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Article
Publication date: 23 August 2021

The purpose of this study is to examine processes in the relationship between WFP and work-family conflict in addition to work related attitudes of women returning to work

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine processes in the relationship between WFP and work-family conflict in addition to work related attitudes of women returning to work after maternity leave who hold management positions.

Design/methodology/approach

Data is gathered from the responses of 238 female managers working for companies throughout Italy who have recently returned to work after maternity leave, to a self-report questionnaire.

Findings

The results show that the availability of WFP is directly or indirectly related to work attitudes among female managers. Work-family conflict is shown to partially mediate the relationship between the availability of WFPs and work engagement and the availability of WFPs moderates the relationship between work engagement and work-family conflict.

Practical implications

Therefore provision of communication and psychological support and flexible time-management policies would provide the organizational structure to produce a healthy work-life balance.

Originality/value

This paper has an original approach by examining the psychological mechanisms underlying the availability WFP on attitudes of women managers returning to work after maternity leave.

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Human Resource Management International Digest , vol. 29 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-0734

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Article
Publication date: 13 September 2021

The purpose was to explore the role of work engagement in mediating between the resources of reverse mentoring and job crafting and the potential outcomes of improved…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose was to explore the role of work engagement in mediating between the resources of reverse mentoring and job crafting and the potential outcomes of improved performance and work withdrawal behavior

Design/methodology/approach

The authors investigated the subjects in the Indian IT sector. They administered a survey online to volunteers from 14 software firms. They received 369 completed questionnaires. The majority of respondents were aged between 25 and 34 and 73.7pc were men.

Findings

Results showed that both reverse monitoring and job crafting increase levels of work engagement, leading to improved performance and less work withdrawal behavior. The study also looked at work engagement as a mediating factor: It partially mediated the relationship between job crafting and both outcomes, fully mediated the relationship between reverse mentoring and withdrawal behavior, and partially mediated the relationship between reverse monitoring and work performance.

Originality/value

The results have practical implications. Organizations need to take note that reverse monitoring and job crafting could motivate employees to reciprocate in kind with higher levels of work engagement. By fostering opportunities for reverse monitoring, organizations could stimulate learning and connections across management levels and age groups. Meanwhile, job crafting would help employees to focus on their strengths, or areas of interest, making their work more enjoyable and productive.

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Human Resource Management International Digest , vol. 29 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-0734

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Article
Publication date: 17 November 2021

Stefanie Paluch, Sven Tuzovic, Heiko F. Holz, Alexander Kies and Moritz Jörling

As service robots increasingly interact with customers at the service encounter, they will inevitably become an integral part of employee's work environment. This research…

Abstract

Purpose

As service robots increasingly interact with customers at the service encounter, they will inevitably become an integral part of employee's work environment. This research investigates frontline employee's perceptions of collaborative service robots (CSR) and introduces a new framework, willingness to collaborate (WTC), to better understand employee–robot interactions in the workplace.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing on appraisal theory, this study employed an exploratory research approach to investigate frontline employees' cognitive appraisal of service robots and their WTC with their nonhuman counterparts in service contexts. Data collection consisted of 36 qualitative problem-centered interviews. Following an iterative thematic analysis, the authors introduce a research framework of frontline employees' WTC with service robots.

Findings

First, this study demonstrates that the interaction between frontline employees and service robots is a multistage appraisal process based on adoption-related perceptions. Second, it identifies important attributes across three categories (employee, robot and job attributes) that provide a foundation to understand the appraisal of CSRs. Third, it presents four employee personas (supporter, embracer, resister and saboteur) that provide a differentiated perspective of how service employee–robot collaboration may differ.

Practical implications

The article identifies important factors that enable and restrict frontline service employees' (FSEs’) WTC with robots.

Originality/value

This is the first paper that investigates the appraisal of CSRs from the perspective of frontline employees. The research contributes to the limited research on human–robot collaboration and expands existing technology acceptance models that fall short to explain post-adoptive coping behavior of service employees in response to service robots in the workplace.

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Journal of Service Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-5818

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Article
Publication date: 15 November 2021

Lilith Arevshatian Whiley and Gina Grandy

The authors explore how service workers negotiate emotional laboring with “dirty” emotions while trying to meet the demands of neoliberal healthcare. In doing so, the…

Abstract

Purpose

The authors explore how service workers negotiate emotional laboring with “dirty” emotions while trying to meet the demands of neoliberal healthcare. In doing so, the authors theorize emotional labor in the context of healthcare as a type of embodied and emotional “dirty” work.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors apply interpretative phenomenological analysis (IPA) to their data collected from National Health Service (NHS) workers in the United Kingdom (UK).

Findings

The authors’ data show that healthcare service workers absorb, contain and quarantine emotional “dirt”, thereby protecting their organization at a cost to their own well-being. Workers also perform embodied practices to try to absolve themselves of their “dirty” labor.

Originality/value

The authors extend research on emotional “dirty” work and theorize that emotional labor can also be conceptualized as “dirty” work. Further, the authors show that emotionally laboring with “dirty” emotions is an embodied phenomenon, which involves workers absorbing and containing patients' emotional “dirt” to protect the institution (at the expense of their well-being).

Details

Qualitative Research in Organizations and Management: An International Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5648

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Article
Publication date: 29 November 2021

Madhumita Banerjee, Paurav Shukla and Nicholas J. Ashill

While the literature on migration highlights the reshaping of host and immigrant population in countries, there is a paucity of research in marketing investigating the…

Abstract

Purpose

While the literature on migration highlights the reshaping of host and immigrant population in countries, there is a paucity of research in marketing investigating the evolving dynamics for acculturation. The purpose of this study is to further the understanding of the emerging phenomenon of acculturation and identity negotiation.

Design/methodology/approach

Three experiments examined situational ethnicity, self-construal and identity negotiation in home and host culture work and social settings. Study 1 and Study 2 were conducted in the United Kingdom (UK), where the host country is the majority population. Study 3 was conducted in the United Arab Emirates (UAE), where the host country is the minority population. Study 4 utilized qualitative interviews in both countries.

Findings

Results from all four studies show that ethnic consumers deploy “indifference” as an identity negotiation mechanism when the host society is the majority population (UK) and when the host society has the minority population (UAE).

Originality/value

The authors offer new insights into identity negotiation by ethnic consumers when the host society is the majority population as well as the minority population. “Indifference”, i.e. preferring to neither fit in nor stand out as an identity negotiation mechanism, is deployed in work and social settings of home and host societies. The authors also advance the existing literature on acculturation by examining whether independent and interdependent self-construal influence identity negotiation.

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International Marketing Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

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Article
Publication date: 9 November 2021

Chandra Sekhar and Manoj Patwardhan

This study's main objective is to investigate the influence of flexible working arrangements (FWAs) on employee job performance. In addition, this research studies the…

Abstract

Purpose

This study's main objective is to investigate the influence of flexible working arrangements (FWAs) on employee job performance. In addition, this research studies the mediating role of supervisor's support on the relationship between FWAs and job performance.

Design/methodology/approach

To test the hypothesised model, cross-sectional data were collected from 214 employees working in 46 service firms in India. The data were analysed by structural equation modelling.

Findings

The supervisor's support mediated the relationship between FWAs and job performance. The study’s results show that role of supervisors shapes the collective social exchange relationship between the organisation and employees. These findings highlight the importance of shared experiences, values and norms, which reciprocate with change-supportive behaviours and abilities. Moreover, supervisors’ support transmits signals through which employees feel more valued and eventually affect their job performance.

Research limitations/implications

The research is confined to India's service industries settings only.

Practical implications

Service firm management recommended implementing FWAs with appropriate organisation level planning, which directly benefits employees' well-being, improves work–life balance, reduces the rate of employee turnover and leads to increased employee productivity.

Originality/value

The study's result is that supervisor's support has a significant influence on employee uptake of FWAs, and understanding how the service firm's context shapes supervisors’ support is critical to improving FWAs implementation.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

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Article
Publication date: 15 November 2021

Imriyas Kamardeen

Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) are responsible for one-third of global deaths. Work stress is a major risk factor for CVDs in the workforce. Construction professionals…

Abstract

Purpose

Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) are responsible for one-third of global deaths. Work stress is a major risk factor for CVDs in the workforce. Construction professionals endure excessive work stress, yet their vulnerability to CVDs remains underexplored. The study investigated the prevalence of CVDs among construction professionals and its relationships to job stressors, stress coping methods and socio-demographics.

Design/methodology/approach

An online survey was conducted among construction professionals in Australia wherein data related to job stressor experiences, stress management methods adopted, and incidents of CVDs were collected. Structural path analysis was conducted to discover associations.

Findings

Junior level professionals reported higher incidents of angina and heart muscle weakening than others. Statistically significant positive associations were discovered between the reported CVDs, and job stressors such as excessive workload, unpredictable work hours, lack of support, discrimination and work–life conflict and negative stress coping methods such as consuming alcohol and/or drugs, emotional eating and aggression. However, no evidence was found to support the claim that demographic factors such as age and gender were also risk factors for CVDs.

Originality/value

The workers' compensation system provides financial protection to injured employees. It extends similar protection for work-related illnesses; however, it is more difficult to prove work-related causes for illnesses. The study provides scientific evidence to support the recognition of CVDs among construction professionals as work-related diseases, mediated by work stress.

Details

Built Environment Project and Asset Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-124X

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Article
Publication date: 10 November 2021

Maya Kroumova, Rakesh Mittal and Joshua Bienstock

This study aims to examine the complex relationship between the personality meta-traits of stability and plasticity and time-based work–family conflict (WFC). Stability…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the complex relationship between the personality meta-traits of stability and plasticity and time-based work–family conflict (WFC). Stability and plasticity are hypothesized to influence WFC directly and indirectly, via boundary strength at work (BSW) and boundary strength at home (BSH) domains. WFC has two dimensions – conflict due to family interfering in work (FIW) and conflict due to work interfering in family (WIF).

Design/methodology/approach

Data was collected from 419 full-time employees in multiple US companies. Hypotheses were tested using structural equation modeling.

Findings

Stability was associated with lower levels of WFC and stronger boundaries around the work and home domains. BSW mediated the relationship between stability and FIW; BSH mediated the relationship between stability and WIF. plasticity was associated with weaker boundaries around the work and home domains. BSW and BSH had a negative relationship with FIW and WIF, respectively.

Research limitations/implications

The study is cross-sectional and limited to time-based work–family conflict. The results support the adoption of a more agentic view of personality in the boundary setting and WFC literatures.

Practical implications

Employers need to design flexible work programs that offer employees control over work–home boundary strength.

Originality/value

The study links stability and plasticity to WFC. It expands the nomological network of work–home boundaries.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

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Article
Publication date: 26 November 2021

Jillian Cavanagh, Hannah Meacham, Patricia Pariona-Cabrera and Timothy Bartram

The purpose of the article is to examine the experiences of workers with intellectual disability (WWID) and subtle discriminatory practices that hold these workers back…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the article is to examine the experiences of workers with intellectual disability (WWID) and subtle discriminatory practices that hold these workers back from thriving at the workplace.

Design/methodology/approach

The research design employs the Shore et al. (2011) framework of inclusion supported by optimal distinctiveness theory (ODT) (Brewer, 1991). These theoretical frames are used to examine the potential for WWID to become members of a work group and experience the opportunity to develop their unique selves, negotiate and thrive through their work for purposeful career outcomes. A qualitative case study approach was adopted through interviews and focus groups with a total of 91 participants: 41 WWID, 5 human resource (HR) managers, 5 duty/department managers (DMs), 24 colleagues and 16 supervisors.

Findings

The authors found that enhancing inclusion is underpinned by the positive impact of human resource management (HRM) practices and line management support for WWID feelings of belongingness and uniqueness that enable them to thrive through their work activities. The authors demonstrate that WWID need manager support and positive social interactions to increase their learning and vitality for work to embrace opportunities for growth. However, when WWID do not have these conditions, there are fewer opportunities for them to thrive at the workplace.

Practical implications

There is a need for formal HRM and management support and inclusive organisational interventions to mitigate discriminatory practices and better support WWID at work. There is an opportunity for HRM to design training and development around belongingness and uniqueness for this cohort of workers to maximise WWID opportunities to thrive through their work.

Originality/value

This study examines a cohort of WWID who are often forgotten and subtly discriminated against more so than other minority or vulnerable cohorts in the workplace, especially in terms of their development and reaching their full potential at work, which has an impact on their ability to thrive through their work. The paper makes an innovative contribution to the HRM literature through unpacking the processes through which Shore et al.'s (2011) conceptualisation of belongingness and uniqueness contributes to thriving for a marginalised and often overlooked cohort of workers.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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