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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2001

Dov Elizur and Meni Koslowsky

The main objective of the present study was to examine the relationship between work values, gender, and organizational commitment. Research on the relationship between…

11417

Abstract

The main objective of the present study was to examine the relationship between work values, gender, and organizational commitment. Research on the relationship between work values, in general, and commitment, in particular, has not identified clear trends. As recent work has shown that gender may be a moderator in predicting outcomes from work values, a model combining these variables was examined. The 24‐item Work Values Questionnaire, constructed by Elizur in previous research and an abbreviated version of the Porter et al., nine‐item organizational commitment questionnaire were used in the study. Data were collected from 204 students, all of whom work outside school. A moderated regression analysis showed that work values, especially cognitive ones, are positively related with commitment and the interaction of values with gender was also found to be a significant predictor of commitment. Some implications of the results were discussed.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 22 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 June 2008

Shi‐Rui Song and Andrew Gale

The purpose of the research is to investigate project managers' work values and their relationship with project managers' competence.

1645

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the research is to investigate project managers' work values and their relationship with project managers' competence.

Design/methodology/approach

In this research, the authors conducted semi‐structured interviews using repertory grid techniques on 18 Chinese project managers. Three different approaches are utilised to analyse data obtained from the interviews.

Findings

The authors categorised work values with different perspectives. Project managers' core work values are identified.

Research limitations/implications

The authors recommend that work values are an important dimension in relation to project manager's competence. The understanding of a project manager's work values has a potential application in human resources development and competence‐based management development.

Originality/value

This paper presents an innovative approach to the investigation of a project manager's competence.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 27 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

Abstract

Details

Generational Career Shifts
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-583-2

Article
Publication date: 14 December 2022

Brian Waterwall, Cody Logan Chullen, Dennis Barber and Tope Adeyemi-Bello

This paper aims to examine work values among job seekers and how these values differ across experience and gender.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine work values among job seekers and how these values differ across experience and gender.

Design/methodology/approach

This study asked participants to rate the importance of various intrinsic and extrinsic work values on a five-point Likert scale. Responses were compared for 865 participants.

Findings

This study found that individuals differed in their ratings of work values based on experience. Individuals with more experience assigned greater importance to intrinsic job characteristics, while those with less experience assigned greater importance to extrinsic job characteristics. Findings further reveal differences in gender ratings of work values, with females assigning greater importance ratings to both intrinsic and extrinsic job characteristics as compared to males.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations of this study include that it drew its data exclusively from a sample of US respondents. Research investigating populations from other geographic regions within the same study may uncover important cross-national similarities/differences. Moreover, although this study examined experience and gender, it excluded other potentially important factors such as ethnicity. Future research should explore international samples and broaden its focus to include additional factors.

Practical implications

Organizations should be aware of how experience and gender shape work values to impact job choice and retention. They may wish to target their recruitment efforts toward certain groups to ensure alignment between candidates' work values and those of available positions.

Originality/value

This study improves on prior research by examining the dual impact of experience and gender in shaping work values.

Details

Higher Education, Skills and Work-Based Learning, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-3896

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 August 2002

Ronald J. Burke

This study examined the relationship of managerial and professional women’s and men’s perceptions of organizational values supportive of work‐personal life balance and…

3005

Abstract

This study examined the relationship of managerial and professional women’s and men’s perceptions of organizational values supportive of work‐personal life balance and their job experiences, work and non‐work satisfactions and psychological wellbeing. Managerial women reporting organizational values more supportive of work‐personal life balance also reported greater job and career satisfaction, less work stress, less intention to quit, greater family satisfaction, fewer psychosomatic symptoms and more positive emotional wellbeing. Managerial men reporting organizational values more supportive of work‐personal life balance also reported working fewer hours and extra hours, less job stress, greater joy in work, lower intentions to quit, greater job, career and life satisfaction, fewer psychosomatic symptoms and more positive emotional and physical well‐being. Multiple regression analyses indicated more independent and significant correlates of organizational values supporting work‐personal life balance among men than among women. Possible explanations for why men might benefit more from such organizational values are offered.

Details

Women in Management Review, vol. 17 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0964-9425

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 30 June 2016

Eddy S. Ng and Emma Parry

Interest in generational research has garnered a lot of attention, as the workplace is seeing multiple generations (i.e., the Silent Generation, Baby Boomers, Gen Xers…

Abstract

Interest in generational research has garnered a lot of attention, as the workplace is seeing multiple generations (i.e., the Silent Generation, Baby Boomers, Gen Xers, and Millennials) working side-by-side for the first time. However, it is unclear how multiple generations of workers interact with each other and affect the workplace. Although there is extant literature on generational differences, some scholars have argued that the effect sizes are small and the differences are not meaningful. The focal aim of this chapter is to present the current state of literature on generational research. We present the relevant conceptualizations and theoretical frameworks that establish generational research. We then review evidence from existing research studies to establish the areas of differences that may exist among the different generations. In our review, we identify the issues arising from generational differences that are relevant to human resource management (HRM) practices, including new workforce entrants, aging workers, the changing nature of work and organizations, and leadership development. We conclude with several directions for future research on modernizing workplace policies and practices, ensuring sustainability in current employment models, facilitating future empirical research, and integrating the effects of globalization in generational research.

Book part
Publication date: 23 November 2022

Ai Tam Le

“Academic values” is one of the most popular terms used in the higher education literature. But how do we study academic values? Besides autonomy, freedom, and…

Abstract

“Academic values” is one of the most popular terms used in the higher education literature. But how do we study academic values? Besides autonomy, freedom, and collegiality, the “values” in “academic values” often remains implicit, leaving a conceptual gap in the literature. Moreover, autonomy, freedom, and collegiality may reflect the shared normative expectations as part of the value system of a profession, rather than the value orientation at the individual level. To examine the latter, this chapter proposes a conceptual framework adapted from the studies of work values in applied psychology. As a heuristic device, the academic work value framework consists of six ideal-typical value orientations belonging to three dimensions: work autonomy, social orientation, and value of knowledge. The framework's relevance and usefulness are evaluated by revisiting relevant literature on academic orientations. The result shows a spectrum of value positions in academic work, from the “old school” values to the “entrepreneurial” ones to the hybrid orientations. Overall, this framework provides a potential approach to operationalize the concept of academic values for empirical research. At the same time, as a heuristic device, it is open for reflection, critique, and further development.

Details

Theory and Method in Higher Education Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80455-385-5

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 15 July 2009

Po-Ju Chen and Dana V. Tesone

This study identified differences of work values between two types of hospitality workforce members: hospitality industry practitioners and hospitality…

Abstract

This study identified differences of work values between two types of hospitality workforce members: hospitality industry practitioners and hospitality student/practitioners. A total of 398 nonstudent practitioners were randomly selected from various hospitality organizations to participate in this study. There were 828 student practitioners included in the data collected from a hospitality management college. Fifteen values were identified along with their hierarchical order. Three-dimensional work value structure shared by hospitality-major student/practitioners and industry practitioners were revealed. They are: General Work Values, Management Work Values, and Hospitality Work Values. The differences of the three dimensions among the four categories of student practitioners and industry practitioners were identified. Furthermore, work values were found to differ by gender. Implications are drawn for industry managers as well as educators.

Details

Advances in Hospitality and Leisure
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-675-1

Article
Publication date: 25 October 2022

Sohee Park and Sunyoung Park

The purpose of this study is to compare the perceptions of work values among different generational groups (Boomers, Generation 386, Generation X and Millennials) in the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to compare the perceptions of work values among different generational groups (Boomers, Generation 386, Generation X and Millennials) in the Korean Government sector.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a sample of 1,084 employees working in the Korean Government sector, this study compared generational differences in work values with seven dimensions: detail, aggressiveness, team orientation, outcome orientation, people orientation, innovation and organization orientation.

Findings

This study found that Millennials had the most significant differences in aggression, team-orientation, innovation and organization-focus, compared to Generation 386. Millennials were less aggressive and more team-oriented and innovative than Generation 386. Millennials also put less value on the organization compared to Generation X and Generation 386, indicating that Millennials are less willing than other generations to sacrifice their individual needs for the needs of the organization. Generation X had higher values in supportiveness, fairness and respect for individuals than Generation 386.

Originality/value

This study adds to the current literature by empirically examining how employees’ work values are influenced by the generational differences of the workers.

Details

European Journal of Training and Development, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-9012

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 22 February 2022

Rhokeun Park

This study explores the role of intrinsic work values as a motivator in the workplace. By integrating the job demands–resources model and supplies–values fit theory, it…

Abstract

Purpose

This study explores the role of intrinsic work values as a motivator in the workplace. By integrating the job demands–resources model and supplies–values fit theory, it also investigates whether autonomy and worker co-operatives can strengthen the intrinsic motivation of employees who have strong intrinsic work values.

Design/methodology/approach

Longitudinal surveys collected at 25 worker co-operatives and 27 corporations were analyzed with a model in which a moderated mediation model and a mediated moderation model are integrated.

Findings

The results revealed that individuals with strong intrinsic work values had stronger intrinsic motivation and engaged less frequently in job search behavior. The moderation analyses demonstrated that employees with strong intrinsic work values were more strongly motivated in worker co-operatives than in corporations and that this result was obtained because more autonomy was granted in worker co-operatives than in corporations.

Research limitations/implications

To date, little research has examined the moderating roles of autonomy and worker co-ops in the associations of intrinsic work values with employee motivation and behavior. The present study contributes to the literature on work values and worker co-operatives by providing evidence that autonomy and worker co-operatives can accelerate intrinsic motivation of employees with intrinsic work values.

Practical implications

Managers should grant employees enough autonomy and opportunities to participate in decision-making to stimulate their motivation, especially for employees with strong intrinsic work values.

Originality/value

By integrating the job demands–resources model with the supplies–values fit theory, this study proposes interaction effects of a personal resource with job and organizational resources on intrinsic motivation.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

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