Search results

1 – 10 of over 53000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 13 October 2021

Kristine L. Beck, James Chong and Bruce D. Niendorf

This study aims to examine whether a good corporate reputation leads to superior investment returns. Theory and empirics provide support for the idea that a good corporate…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine whether a good corporate reputation leads to superior investment returns. Theory and empirics provide support for the idea that a good corporate reputation improves firm value, but much of the previous research fails to consider the risk of the companies they study and relies only on accounting measures of performance such as return on assets. A complete picture of the relationship between corporate reputation and shareholder value should include risk-adjusted returns and correlation with benchmark returns.

Design/methodology/approach

The Harris Poll Reputation Quotient (RQ), based on the reputations of the 100 most visible companies, suggests that companies with a “solid reputation” are more likely to be attractive investments. The authors construct portfolios using deciles and the RQ categories, rebalancing annually as RQ rankings are updated. Returns are adjusted for risk using Jensen's alpha, the information ratio, the Sharpe ratio, Modigliani and Modigliani's M2 measure, and Muralidhar's M3 measure.

Findings

The results indicate that choosing a portfolio based on the highest RQ-ranked firms does outperform the market on a risk-adjusted basis, and that the relationship between rankings and time-weighted returns is roughly monotonic. The authors also observe that corporate reputation is persistent, and that the best and worst most-visible firms are more likely to be privately held.

Originality/value

This research adds to the literature by including both market-based return measures and risk in the examination of the relationship between corporate reputation and financial performance.

Details

American Journal of Business, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1935-5181

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 11 October 2021

Nurmadi Harsa Sumarta, Mugi Rahardjo, Kingkin Kurnia Trio Satriya, Edy Supriyono and Prihatnolo Gandhi Amidjaya

This paper aims to find empirical evidence of bank ownership structures on bank reputation through the mediating role of sustainability reporting (SR) in Indonesian banking sector.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to find empirical evidence of bank ownership structures on bank reputation through the mediating role of sustainability reporting (SR) in Indonesian banking sector.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper uses purposive sampling to obtain 279 observations from 43 listed banks in Indonesia Stock Exchange during 2012–2018. This study uses structure equation modelling analysis in the AMOS software and intervening test from the Sobel test to investigate the direct and indirect effect in this research model.

Findings

The empirical results evidence: foreign, government and public ownership exhibit significant positive effect on SR but not with family ownership; SR positively affects bank reputation; SR appears as a mediator in which foreign, government and public ownership have a positive effect on the bank reputation through the indirect effect of SR while family ownership exhibits insignificant result.

Practical implications

The practical contribution of this study is that SR is proven to increase bank reputation through the legitimation from the public, so the management must properly pay attention by publishing this report.

Originality/value

This study provides several novelties to the literature: SR is used as a mediator in the relationships between bank ownership and reputation in which there is very limited studies investigating these aspects, especially in Indonesia. In addition, most SR studies in Indonesia still focus on SR determinants rather than its impact; customer deposits are used as a measurement basis of the bank reputation as it reflects better the trust and perception of the market so that it is relevant with the reputation level.

Details

Social Responsibility Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-1117

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 10 September 2021

Theresa Bernhard and Dirk Holtbrügge

International assignments rely on interactions between host country nationals (HCNs) and an international assignee (IA). These interactions are significantly determined by…

Abstract

Purpose

International assignments rely on interactions between host country nationals (HCNs) and an international assignee (IA). These interactions are significantly determined by the reputation that the IA holds among HCNs. However, reputation has only scarcely been addressed in extant mobility research, and there is a lack of understanding about how the reputation of an IA shifts among HCNs during the course of an assignment. The purpose of this paper is to understand the development of an individual's reputation as well as the interactions between an IA and HCNs in the context of international assignments.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a conceptual paper that builds upon the central idea in extant research of individual reputation as a social construction and draws on sensemaking theory to develop its conceptual model.

Findings

As extant research argues for both a temporal and dynamic dimension of reputation, the authors introduce time and reputational richness as central model elements. Furthermore, the conceptual model proposes reputational events as the principal triggers for reputational shifts. Reputational events reveal quantitatively and qualitatively new informational cues about the IA to HCNs, who then use these cues to incrementally construct the IA's reputation in sensemaking processes. In addition, contextual factors of reputational shifts, namely accelerators and amplifiers, are discussed. The authors argue that these contextual factors may affect both the timing and the strength of reputational shifts.

Originality/value

The study introduces a novel conceptual model and contributes to the understanding of individual reputation development as well as the interactions between an IA and HCNs in international assignments.

Details

Journal of Global Mobility: The Home of Expatriate Management Research, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-8799

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 10 October 2016

Fraser Bell

As place branding is reaching an impasse in terms of its development with numerous shortcomings being uncovered, this commentary suggests that the practice can be…

Downloads
1011

Abstract

Purpose

As place branding is reaching an impasse in terms of its development with numerous shortcomings being uncovered, this commentary suggests that the practice can be repositioned as part of the more comprehensive notion of place reputation. By building on the idea of corporate reputation and embryonic evidence of its application to geographical entities, this paper aims to argue for a more substantial translation of this concept to cities and regions.

Design/methodology/approach

This idea was investigated through empirical work in English second-tier cities, specifically concerning semi-structured interviews with local and regional stakeholders on the topic of place reputation conducted in 2014.

Findings

The empirical work found that place branding and place reputation can remain complimentary to one another, are entwined and are problematic to disentangle. This discovered that place branding is not as effective when used in isolation, and the concept benefits from the support of a more comprehensive reputation management strategy. In addition, this study found that the idea of reputational capital is a key theory for the development of reputation, allowing this broad notion to be tackled in terms of audiences, domains and sectors.

Originality/value

Moreover, this commentary constitutes a novel piece of research, and this is achieved by exploring gaps in both interdisciplinary place branding and corporate literatures of reputation being applied to place. This is addressed from a relational economic geography perspective, with the support of reputational capital which has links to Pierre Bourdieu’s (1986) Forms of Capital, this seeks to raise issues and add value to current place branding debates.

Details

Journal of Place Management and Development, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8335

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 September 1999

Michael T. Ewing, Albert Caruana and Ernest Rinson Loy

The importance of corporate reputation is widely acknowledged in both contemporary and academic business writings. While reputation is a difficult concept to measure…

Downloads
1828

Abstract

The importance of corporate reputation is widely acknowledged in both contemporary and academic business writings. While reputation is a difficult concept to measure, managers frequently assume a positive relationship between business performance and corporate reputation. The literature avers that from a client’s perspective, a healthy reputation may act as a risk suppresser. In this empirical study, the nature of corporate reputation and risk aversion in professional engineering consultancies is examined. Findings support a three‐dimensional reputation construct, but there is no evidence to suggest that a good corporate reputation reduces clients’ perceived risk. Implications are drawn, limitations noted and directions offered for ongoing research.

Details

Corporate Communications: An International Journal, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1356-3289

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 1993

Paul Herbig and John Milewicz

Considers the importance of a firms′ reputation to the success orfailure of its brands; the effect on the firm′s brand when a firm′sreputation decays; how important it is…

Downloads
3972

Abstract

Considers the importance of a firms′ reputation to the success or failure of its brands; the effect on the firm′s brand when a firm′s reputation decays; how important it is for a firm to maintain or advance I reputation; how a brand′s reputation can be transferred to other products. Addresses and discusses these issues in detail and emphasises the importance of reputation to the ultimate success of a product and company and warns against ignoring its fragility.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 13 August 2021

Naveen Jain, Danilo Le Sante, Chockalingam Viswesvaran and Rakesh Belwal

The psychological contract breach (PCB) literature has documented the negative effects of PCB on employee job attitudes and the variables that moderate (accentuate or…

Abstract

Purpose

The psychological contract breach (PCB) literature has documented the negative effects of PCB on employee job attitudes and the variables that moderate (accentuate or mitigate) this relationship. Given that multiple variables together influence a subordinate’s PCB – job attitudes relationship, this paper aims to investigate a three-way interaction between corporate reputation, supervisor’s and subordinate’s PCBs on the job attitudes of the latter.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors collected a dyadic sample of 227 employees and their 79 supervisors from some of the well-known companies in Oman. The authors used SPSS (version 25) to examine the three-way interaction of focal employee PCB, supervisor PCB and corporate reputation on employee job attitudes.

Findings

The results indicated that depending on the perception of corporate reputation, the extent of the supervisor’s PCB perception has a differential influence on the employee PCB – job attitudes relationship.

Originality/value

By investigating the joint (sometimes conflicting) influences of multiple moderators which enhances the ecological validity, this paper makes an original and important contribution to the PCB literature.

Details

Review of International Business and Strategy, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-6014

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 January 2002

Fouad K. AlNajjar and Ahmed Riahi‐Belkaoui

The article hypothesizes that the level of reputation affects both the informativeness of earnings and the magnitude of discretionary accounting accrual adjustments. The…

Abstract

The article hypothesizes that the level of reputation affects both the informativeness of earnings and the magnitude of discretionary accounting accrual adjustments. The hypothesis exploits the following: the positive relationship between reputation and firms' risk‐return profiles, and managers' incentives in using discretionary accounting accrual adjustments. Results show that reputation is positively associated with earnings' explanatory power for returns, and related to the magnitude of accounting accrual adjustments.

Details

Review of Accounting and Finance, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1475-7702

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 11 May 2010

Thomas M. Krueger, Mark A. Wrolstad and Shane Van Dalsem

The purpose of this paper is to examine the contemporaneous relationship between changes in corporate reputations and stock prices.

Downloads
1721

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the contemporaneous relationship between changes in corporate reputations and stock prices.

Design/methodology/approach

The Harris Interactive Reputation QuotientTM is used as a measure of corporate reputation. Stock return and risk measures are evaluated for each Reputation QuotientTM survey period for the years 1999‐2007.

Findings

The results provide evidence that, in the aggregate, firm reputations are procyclical. Additionally, firms with improved reputations enjoy lower volatility in their stock prices than firms with diminished reputations.

Research limitations/implications

Due to the Harris Poll Online methodology, it is not clear that the price changes occur concurrently with the change in reputation.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the finance literature by examining the effect of a change in corporate reputation on stock price.

Details

Managerial Finance, vol. 36 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4358

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 27 April 2010

Pieter Klaas Jagersma

The article aims to elaborate on the importance of “managing reputation equity” in the banking industry.

Downloads
2549

Abstract

Purpose

The article aims to elaborate on the importance of “managing reputation equity” in the banking industry.

Design/methodology/approach

This article has been derived in part from the reputation improvement plans of investment banks and in part from the author's own experience as a non‐executive director.

Findings

The most critical and strategic asset a bank possesses is its reputation. A “reputation improvement plan” is a critical document for the board of directors. In practice, reputation improvement plans vary enormously in terms of structure, format and content. This article summarizes what content should ideally be included. Furthermore, it is important to remember that reputation improvement planning is just one component of the process – the other components are implementing the plan, monitoring progress and auditing the reputation's situation. And, although the focus is often on the document, it is the process of drafting, discussing, agreeing and using it that is important. The document facilitates discussion and decision making and can then be used as a guide to action.

Practical implications

The process of producing a “reputation improvement plan” forces management to think through the issues related to a particular reputation and how to address them. The document itself summarizes the reputation's competitive position and guides the implementation of strategic initiatives. In banks (such as Goldman Sachs) that the board of directors with significant input from stakeholders (for instance, important customers), revised in a series of iterations with management before being agreed, and linked to other functional plans (e.g. operations, sales plans etc.) ensuring that all the bank's activities are focused on achieving common goals. A successful reputation improvement plan and program will only occur when at least the following combined forces are effective: a vision of something better (a clear target embedded in a plan) and a few practical first steps to achieve (to launch the process). Reputation is not a gift, but really hard work.

Originality/value

Reputational capital is a vital strategic resource. Reputations reflect a bank's relative success in fulfilling the expectations of multiple stakeholders. They are crucial because they “work” for banks. Therefore, establishing a great reputation is a key element of organizational strategy. Banks will become increasingly focused on managing their reputations over the next decade. The article is about unlocking the value of reputation through reputation improvement planning.

Details

Business Strategy Series, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-5637

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 53000