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Article

Thomas Niedomysl and Mikael Jonasson

Place marketing approaches are increasingly employed by public authorities competing to attract capital. While a growing number of studies have provided valuable insights…

Abstract

Purpose

Place marketing approaches are increasingly employed by public authorities competing to attract capital. While a growing number of studies have provided valuable insights, scholars appear to be struggling to advance their theoretical understanding. This is arguably the result of failure to produce evidence‐based research, excessive focus on small‐scale case studies, difficulties bridging disciplinary boundaries, and reluctance to advance generalizations. To overcome these problems, the purpose of this paper is to present a framework that can be used to generate empirically testable hypotheses and thereby provide a structure for research.

Design/methodology/approach

A brief literature review first identifies obstacles that prevent place marketing research from making significant progress. Second, to overcome these obstacles, the paper identifies the need to consider spatial competition for capital, which has, remarkably, been overlooked. Third, drawing on these insights, a conceptual framework is presented. Fourth, from this framework, six propositions are deduced that may enable the development of a theory of place marketing.

Findings

This work first identifies the need for a more rigorous approach to the scientific study of place marketing. Second, a conceptual framework is suggested, based on spatial competition for capital. Third, the paper demonstrates that testable hypotheses can be deduced from the framework to provide a structure for research. Arguably, empirically testing such hypotheses would significantly advance our understanding of place marketing.

Originality/value

This paper identifies a feasible way to structure future research that should interest place marketing researchers seeking a more rigorous approach to theoretical advancement.

Details

Journal of Place Management and Development, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8335

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Article

Mihalis Kavaratzis and Gregory Ashworth

This paper serves two purposes. First, to identify the stages of the historical development of place marketing, because place marketing has developed over time through…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper serves two purposes. First, to identify the stages of the historical development of place marketing, because place marketing has developed over time through discrete phases, which differ in their sophistication as well as in their approaches and objectives. Secondly, to identify and articulate significant issues, which will determine the “way forward” for place marketing.

Design/methodology/approach

Place marketing has been shaped by developments within marketing science and cognate disciplines but also by the external historical contexts at various spatial scales that determined its assumptions, goals and priorities. A concordance of a number of approaches to the evolution of place marketing is attempted and from this, conclusions are drawn about the current assumptions upon which place marketing is based.

Findings

Seven issues are identified that appear to hinder marketing implementation from delivering its full contribution and are suggested here as significant for the future of place marketing. The most important ones refer to the need for a collective understanding and appreciation of place marketing, the achievement of wide cooperation and clear role allocation, the implementation of marketing as a long‐term process and the expansion of marketing understanding to fields other than tourism development.

Originality/value

The originality of this paper lies in the clear articulation of the historical episodes of place marketing development and, at the same time, the identification of the issues mentioned above, which will determine the effectiveness of place marketing practice. Therefore, the paper is of great value to both academic commentators and practitioners of place marketing.

Details

Journal of Place Management and Development, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8335

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Article

Nnamdi O. Madichie

This paper seeks to highlight hip‐hop's contribution to the entrepreneurship and place marketing literature. Hip‐hop is taken from the lens of an individual artist, Akon…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to highlight hip‐hop's contribution to the entrepreneurship and place marketing literature. Hip‐hop is taken from the lens of an individual artist, Akon, whose music and lyrics – a “hybrid of silky, West African‐styled vocals mixed with North America's East Coast and Southern beats” – provides fresh insights for place marketers.

Design/methodology/approach

A “discourse analysis” of the lyrics from two non‐chart songs Senegal and Mama Africa provided the conceptual base for a better understanding of the fusion of music and entrepreneurship with place marketing.

Findings

Through music, Akon has bridged socio‐cultural (ethnic cuisine, immigration and social exclusion, faith or spirituality) and economic attributes (notably remittances) – with implications for entrepreneurship and place marketing.

Research limitations/implications

The paper demonstrates that music and entrepreneurship can be extended to place marketing using discourse analysis. Future research may need to consider how to leverage the potential of celebrity endorsement or partnerships in place marketing strategies. It was by no accident that Akon was recruited by PepsiCo for the recently concluded 2010 FIFA World Cup in South Africa through a charity single – Oh Africa!

Originality/value

The paper is an attempt to fuse three distinct streams of literature (music, entrepreneurship and place marketing). The value lies in extrapolating a well‐known, but little discussed, subject in academia, i.e. the role of hip‐hop music in the place marketing discourse.

Details

Journal of Place Management and Development, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8335

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Article

Paul J. Tranter

This paper explains how the location of motorsports events is an integral part of the marketing of the sport of motor racing and of all its attendant commercial interests…

Abstract

This paper explains how the location of motorsports events is an integral part of the marketing of the sport of motor racing and of all its attendant commercial interests. Case studies of the major motorsports events staged in public street circuits in Australia are used to illustrate how the locations have particular symbolic significance that adds legitimacy to the sport of motor racing, and the messages and impacts associated with these events. The paper examines the wider significance of allowing special public spaces in cities to be used for motorsports events, and contends that the marketing of sporting events should not be considered independently of the major challenges facing the world.

Details

International Journal of Sports Marketing and Sponsorship, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1464-6668

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Article

Dominic Medway and Gary Warnaby

This paper aims to consider the role of demarketing in the specific context of the marketing of places, and to introduce a typology of place demarketing and related place

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to consider the role of demarketing in the specific context of the marketing of places, and to introduce a typology of place demarketing and related place marketing activity.

Design/methodology/approach

Following a review of the extant literature on place marketing and branding, place image and demarketing, the paper outlines a number of different types of place demarketing and more unusual place marketing strategies, with examples of each.

Findings

The marketing of places has grown in scale and importance, both as a practice and as an area of academic research, as places have had to become more entrepreneurial in an ever‐increasing competitive environment. Places are increasingly conceptualised as brands to be marketed, and a key emphasis of such activity is the creation of an attractive place image and/or the dilution of negative place images. This is reinforced in the academic literature. Counter to this “conventional wisdom”, this article conceptualises various types of place demarketing activity and related place marketing activities; namely “passive place demarketing”, “informational place demarketing”, “crisis place demarketing”, and also “perverse place marketing” and “dark place marketing”.

Originality/value

This paper provides a unique counter to the “conventional wisdom” of place marketing by introducing the concept of place demarketing and perverse and dark place marketing which more explicitly accentuate the negative, rather than accentuating the positive which is the norm in this marketing context. A typology of such activities is introduced and the implications for place brands are considered.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 42 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article

Matthew Alexander and Kathy Hamilton

The purpose of this paper is to explore how community involvement can support the authors who are guided by the following research questions: how do community residents…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore how community involvement can support the authors who are guided by the following research questions: how do community residents contribute to heritage marketing strategies that represent their local area? How does community involvement in heritage marketing encourage place identification? How can organisations facilitate community participation in heritage marketing?

Design/methodology/approach

The authors draw on an ethnographic study of the adopted railway stations in Scotland. They use in-depth interviews and participant observation alongside visual and archival data.

Findings

The authors present and discuss three themes: community involvement in heritage activities, community heritage marketing and place identification, facilitating community participation through Adopt a Station.

Research limitations/implications

Initiatives that empower residents should be prioritised to capitalise on their latent knowledge, skills and expertise. The authors suggest that bringing heritage outside the museum space into key places used by local residents will support the increased accessibility of heritage.

Originality/value

While there are often strong arguments in favour of local community involvement in place marketing, it is much less common to find successful reports of this working in practice. Research either questions the capabilities of local residents to make meaningful contributions or hints at a tokenistic form of involvement. The authors contribute by offering insights into successful heritage-based community activity. Unlike previous research which focuses on the economic impact of place marketing, this paper focuses on place identification for local residents. The authors also observe how offering a sense of ownership and freedom allows community management of the heritage message to flourish.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 50 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article

Gordon Wills, Sherril H. Kennedy, John Cheese and Angela Rushton

To achieve a full understanding of the role ofmarketing from plan to profit requires a knowledgeof the basic building blocks. This textbookintroduces the key concepts in…

Abstract

To achieve a full understanding of the role of marketing from plan to profit requires a knowledge of the basic building blocks. This textbook introduces the key concepts in the art or science of marketing to practising managers. Understanding your customers and consumers, the 4 Ps (Product, Place, Price and Promotion) provides the basic tools for effective marketing. Deploying your resources and informing your managerial decision making is dealt with in Unit VII introducing marketing intelligence, competition, budgeting and organisational issues. The logical conclusion of this effort is achieving sales and the particular techniques involved are explored in the final section.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 28 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article

Georgios I. Zekos

Aim of the present monograph is the economic analysis of the role of MNEs regarding globalisation and digital economy and in parallel there is a reference and examination…

Abstract

Aim of the present monograph is the economic analysis of the role of MNEs regarding globalisation and digital economy and in parallel there is a reference and examination of some legal aspects concerning MNEs, cyberspace and e‐commerce as the means of expression of the digital economy. The whole effort of the author is focused on the examination of various aspects of MNEs and their impact upon globalisation and vice versa and how and if we are moving towards a global digital economy.

Details

Managerial Law, vol. 45 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

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Abstract

Details

Marketing Management in Turkey
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-558-0

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Book part

Chung-Shing Chan and Lawal M. Marafa

This chapter explores the concept of branding in a contemporary competitive arena of places. The multi-dimensional interpretations of places offer a variety of…

Abstract

This chapter explores the concept of branding in a contemporary competitive arena of places. The multi-dimensional interpretations of places offer a variety of possibilities to better understand the true essence of destination branding. One of the common interpretations of places is through the study of their images, as destination branding requires a thorough understanding of destination image. The important foundation and relation of destination image are specified and explained. The notion of destination branding has evolved from the fields of marketing and urban studies and has become a cross-disciplinary research area. Thus, the researchers explain that destination branding as well as ‘place branding’ are dynamic concepts that are being continuously being explored in academia for the benefit of practitioners in travel and tourism. This chapter suggests that the use of brand equity is also one of the frontier areas of study in ‘place branding’ as it emphasises the need to thematise destinations (e.g. for their historical heritage, cultural value, natural attractions, etc.) and places for residence (e.g. as green cities, creative cities, smart cities, etc.).

Details

The Branding of Tourist Destinations: Theoretical and Empirical Insights
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-373-9

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