Search results

1 – 10 of over 6000
Article
Publication date: 16 July 2018

Zilong Liu, Xuequn Wang and Jun Liu

Digital natives have become significant users of social network sites (SNSs); therefore, their disclosed personal information can be misused by SNS providers and/or other…

Abstract

Purpose

Digital natives have become significant users of social network sites (SNSs); therefore, their disclosed personal information can be misused by SNS providers and/or other users. The purpose of this paper is to understand how digital natives make their self-disclosure decisions on SNSs, as well as whether the concept of culture can still be relevant to digital natives.

Design/methodology/approach

The hypotheses were tested with survey data collected from the USA and China.

Findings

The results show that trust in SNSs and trust in SNS users are positively related to social rewards. Social rewards are positively related to intention to self-disclose, while privacy risk is positively related to privacy concerns. Further, culture significantly moderates the relationship between trust and social rewards.

Research limitations/implications

The study clarifies the effects of different types of trust on privacy in the context of SNSs. Further, the study shows the effects of culture when digital natives make self-disclosure decisions.

Practical implications

SNS providers also need to focus on different types of trust when operating in different cultural contexts. Further, SNS providers expanding their markets should emphasize social rewards to increase the likelihood of self-disclosure.

Originality/value

The results show that while culture can still be helpful to explain digital natives’ trust beliefs, digital natives have started to converge regarding their perceptions about privacy concerns and self-disclosure.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 32 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 26 February 2021

Tandy M. Ombogo and Ben W. Namande

The purpose of this study is to assess the influence of generations on information behavior and needs to access and use of library resources and how well academic…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to assess the influence of generations on information behavior and needs to access and use of library resources and how well academic libraries in Kenya are simultaneously serving both generations. From literature reviewed, a study on the Kenyan scenario on generational behavior and needs was not identified and this study sought to fill that gap.

Design/methodology/approach

Data collected were done through mixed-methods research using observation, structured interviews and questionnaires. The sample included 143 students and faculty within different generations, and three library staffs at The United States International University-Africa’s Library. Quantitative data were analyzed through SPSS and Excel, while qualitative data were analyzed according to the theme of this study. Likert-scale responses were used to measure information behavior of users’ needs and preferences.

Findings

Findings showed that the library is serving two distinct generations with different needs: out of a mean score of 5.00 of sample surveyed; digital immigrants need information resources mainly for research at an aggregate 3.93 while digital natives need information resources mainly for examinations at an aggregate 4.01. Both generations need to use technology to access and use information resources at 94% of digital immigrants and an aggregate 81.5% of digital natives surveyed. The library is training both user groups accordingly. This answered the research problem this study sought to assess.

Research limitations/implications

The generation of users was known only after administering the questionnaires. Consequently, the researcher targeted them using the status of respondents, faculty or student, to maximize sampling for each generation. Undergraduate and master’s students were used to target digital natives, while the faculty was used to target digital immigrants. PhD students were used to target both digital immigrants and digital natives. This study was done only in one location, USIU-Africa’s Library.

Originality/value

This study assessed how different generations within academic libraries in Kenya could be guided to effectively and efficiently adapt to global changes. This study assessed generational influence on needs and preferences in access and use of information resources, and assessed how academic libraries are concurrently and successfully serving variant user needs in Kenya,

Details

Global Knowledge, Memory and Communication, vol. 70 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9342

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 23 March 2012

Martin Zimerman

The purpose of this paper is to show that digital natives are different from older age groups.

3951

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to show that digital natives are different from older age groups.

Design/methodology/approach

The first survey asks questions about general computer searching behaviors. The second survey asks the students to find two items to see if they can find them.

Findings

Digital natives are different in their search behavior, preferring to use web‐based search engines such as Google, Yahoo and Bing.

Research limitations/implications

There are 120 respondents to the first survey and 27 in the second.

Practical implications

More focus needs to be placed on the digital natives' search habits to find out how best to serve this population.

Social implications

Unless digital natives are taught how to search academic databases, they will be done a great disservice.

Originality/value

The two surveys are unique in data content.

Details

New Library World, vol. 113 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 July 2009

Neil Selwyn

The purpose of this paper is to develop and promote a realistic understanding of young people and digital technology with a view to supporting information professionals in…

19728

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop and promote a realistic understanding of young people and digital technology with a view to supporting information professionals in playing useful and meaningful roles in supporting current generations of young people. In particular the paper aims to offer a critical perspective on popular and political understandings of young people and digital technologies – characterised by notions of “digital natives”, the “net generation” and other commonsense portrayals of expert young technology users. The paper seeks to consider the accuracy of such descriptions in reflecting young people's actual uses of digital technology and digital information.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper provides a comprehensive review of the recent published literatures on young people and digital technology in information sciences, education studies and media/communication studies.

Findings

The findings show that young people's engagements with digital technologies are varied and often unspectacular – in stark contrast to popular portrayals of the digital native. As such, the paper highlights a misplaced technological and biological determinism that underpins current portrayals of children, young people and digital technology.

Originality/value

The paper challenges the popular assumption that current generations of children and young people are innate, talented users of digital technologies. Having presented a more realistic basis for approaching generational differences in technology use, the paper explores the functions and roles that information professionals can be expected to play in supporting young people in the digital age.

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 61 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 26 August 2014

Andy Phippen and Simon Ashby

This research explores the implications for risk management of “People Risk.” In particular how online digital behaviors, particularly from young people entering the…

Abstract

Purpose

This research explores the implications for risk management of “People Risk.” In particular how online digital behaviors, particularly from young people entering the workplace for the first time, might impact on the work setting and how risk management might mitigate impact on the employee and organization.

Design/methodology/approach

A mixed methods approach was used to consider these implications and draws from a number of data sources in the United Kingdom including a database of self-review data around online safety policy and practice from over 2000 schools, a survey of over 1000 14–16 year olds and their attitudes toward sexting, and a survey of over 500 undergraduate students. In addition the work considers existing risk management approaches and the models therein and how they might be applied to people risk.

Findings

The dataset analyzed in this exploration show an education system in the United Kingdom that is not adequately preparing young people with an awareness of the implications of digital behavior in their lives and the survey data shows distorted social norms that might have serious consequences in the workplace.

Practical implications

This research should raise concerns for managers in the workplace who need to be aware of the changes in “normal” behavior and how these potentially harmful practices may be mitigated in the workplace.

Originality/value

The research provides a strong evidence base for a change in “acceptable” social behavior by children and young people alongside an education system not promoting effective awareness. These two datasets combined highlight potential new risks to the workplace.

Details

Social Media in Strategic Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-898-3

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 October 2011

Alex J. Autry and Zane Berge

This paper aims to review characteristics associated with digital natives and digital immigrants and explores selected research studies related to information and

4426

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to review characteristics associated with digital natives and digital immigrants and explores selected research studies related to information and communication technology. Some of the challenges facing the twenty‐first century in training and developing our future workforce are explored, along with the differences between generations that contribute to their personal learning and instructional styles.

Design/methodology/approach

A review of the literature is combined with the authors' experience and the reporting of a survey on generational differences regarding perceived usefulness of technology in training programs.

Findings

A new digital language is evolving and is increasingly prevalent with technical savvy individuals as a normal means of communication, creating a communication lull between generations affecting both the digital natives and digital immigrants. This communication barrier extends beyond the casual day‐to‐day endeavors but reaches into learning environments. The survey indicated that the younger the respondent, the more favorable that person is to wanting technology in the learning environment.

Practical implications

In order for effective learning to occur both instructors and students must be able to match both instructional strategies and learning styles consistently. In addition, those who are responsible for aligning educational and learning strategies should meet the training and development programs being deployed. There is a need to examine possible rationale correlating with native and immigrant lifestyles that support their cognitive process. These processes relate to how natives and immigrants receive information and how it stimulates the brain to connect the inputs with previously learned data – how an individual's brain becomes “wired” to manipulate stored data to be used during problem‐solving and critical thinking activities in both life events and training sessions.

Originality/value

The paper explores whether individuals of the younger generation have more of a learning advantage or disadvantage compared to learners from an older generation. Exposure to new technologies strengthens the user's acceptance and knowledge of the digital product and may begin to acquaint them with other and future similar technological gadgets.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 43 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 31 May 2018

Andrew J. Dahl, Anthony M. D’Alessandro, James W. Peltier and Eric L. Swan

Social causes increasingly rely on omni-channel touchpoints involving personal discussions and grassroots digital marketing efforts to engage individuals via social…

2219

Abstract

Purpose

Social causes increasingly rely on omni-channel touchpoints involving personal discussions and grassroots digital marketing efforts to engage individuals via social referrals. This paper aims to examine digital natives’ perceived effectiveness of omni-channel touchpoints for increasing social cause engagement including social media, digital media, traditional and interpersonal communications, along with an individual’s social/digital media behaviors.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper reports empirical results from an online survey of 924 digital natives. The paper uses multivariate and multiple regression analyses to examine the differential effects of a diverse range of media influencing the perceived effectiveness of social cause referrals from a family member versus a close friend.

Findings

The results identify the combination of omni-channel touchpoints most likely to be effective for enhancing organ donation support and registration efforts as part of social referral campaigns. The findings suggest differences exist based on whether the campaign targets family members or friends.

Research limitations/implications

The research focuses on digital natives and does not address differences that may vary by specific messages shared across generational groups or ethnicities. More research is also necessary, which examines the effects of digital consumption versus content creation behaviors.

Practical implications

The paper includes implications for social marketers looking at increasing viral reach and engagement via social referral campaigns. Marketers should integrate the omni-channel touchpoints deemed to be most effective for each target based on specific campaign goals.

Originality/value

This paper addresses a gap in marketers’ understanding of how digital natives perceive social referral campaigns targeting their social circle via various omni-channel touchpoints.

Details

Journal of Research in Interactive Marketing, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7122

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 September 2022

Kristen L. Sussman, Laura F. Bright and Gary B. Wilcox

The digital environment afforded by social networks has created an opportunity to understand more clearly the impact of social media native advertising on advertising…

Abstract

Purpose

The digital environment afforded by social networks has created an opportunity to understand more clearly the impact of social media native advertising on advertising processing outcomes. Thus, the current study integrates native advertising with engagement literature to compare engagement outcomes between feed and banner placements before analyzing engagement outcomes of sponsored social media posts by advertising objective. This work aims to contribute to advertising effectiveness literature arguing for the importance of engagement as a measure of effectiveness.

Design/methodology/approach

Facebook advertising data were collected from a convenience sample of 10 Facebook advertisers that accounted for roughly $414,000 in advertising spend. Panel data, which are also called longitudinal or cross-sectional time-series data, used 26 months of data from the 10 advertisers to measure relationships between native advertising exposure and digital consumer engagement with advertising by advertising objectives of brand awareness, link clicks, conversions, post-engagement and video views.

Findings

Exposure to native advertising was a strong predictor of advertising processing and consumption using the three variables of interest: clicks, comments and shares. Ads reaching consumers while natively consuming content in their feed resulted in statistically significant improvements in impressions and clicks when compared to banner ads. Exposure to native ads was significantly related to all engagement outcomes of interest, except for advertisers who chose post-engagement as their advertising objective.

Practical implications

The results suggest that for advertisers seeking clicks, post-engagement objectives should likely be avoided. For this group, impressions were not related to link clicks but were related to comments and shares. Native advertising placements in the feed, however, are generally more effective than banner ads on Facebook for advertisers seeking engagement.

Research limitations/implications

This research is one of few studies to use longitudinal advertising data to explore engagement effects using real-world data collected from a diverse set of Facebook advertisers over a 26-month period. This study shows that interactive marketers using a social media feed to reach consumers can expect positive outcomes in advertising consumption, affective and cognitive processing and advocacy, but those outcomes may vary by advertising objective.

Originality/value

Given the uniqueness of the data set, the findings contribute to native advertising literature and to the literature on digital consumer engagement with advertising in social media. The study also provides empirical support for the efficacy of native advertising.

Details

Journal of Research in Interactive Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7122

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 September 2001

Marc Prensky

Part one of this paper highlights how students today think and process information fundamentally differently from their predecessors, as a result of being surrounded by…

88118

Abstract

Part one of this paper highlights how students today think and process information fundamentally differently from their predecessors, as a result of being surrounded by new technology. The author compares these “digital natives” with the older generation who are learning and adopting new technology naming them “digital immigrants”.

Details

On the Horizon, vol. 9 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 July 2022

Wenshin Chen

This study seeks to explore digital natives' mobile usage behaviors and, in turn, develop an analytic framework that helps articulate the underlying components of mobile…

Abstract

Purpose

This study seeks to explore digital natives' mobile usage behaviors and, in turn, develop an analytic framework that helps articulate the underlying components of mobile addiction syndrome (MAS), its severity levels and mobile usage purposes.

Design/methodology/approach

The investigation adopts a survey method and a case study. The results of the former are based on 411 random classroom observations and 205 questionnaire responses, and the insights of the latter are derived from 24 interviews and daily observations.

Findings

The findings validate five distinctive signs that constitute MAS and their significant correlations with each of the Big Five personality traits. Classroom observations confirm the prevalence of addiction tendency among digital natives in the research context. Seven levels of MAS and six different mobile usage purposes further manifest themselves from case analysis. There appears to be a sharp contrast between the addicted and non-addicted groups in their mobile purposes and behavioral patterns. Additionally, family relationships seem influential in shaping non-addictive mobile usage behaviors.

Research limitations/implications

Psychological perspectives on MAS may be important but insufficient. Empirical investigation on a global scale, especially with distinctive cross-cultural comparisons, will be highly encouraged. How MAS evolves over time should also serve as future research interests.

Practical implications

Teaching pedagogy of college education might need certain adjustments to intrigue digital natives' learning interests. Future managers might also need to adopt better performance measurements for digital natives who barely separate work from personal matters in their mobile devices.

Social implications

Parents and healthcare institutions may need to develop response mechanism to tackle this global issue at home and in society. The long-term effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on MAS might also deserve global attention.

Originality/value

The analytic framework developed provides an original mechanism that can be valuable in identifying MAS severity and associated behavioral patterns.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 6000